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There’s Something About Mullet

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There is something about mullet that makes them attractive to anglers across ALL disciplines... There is something about mullet that makes them attractive to anglers across ALL disciplines...

Shaun Cumming reckons there's something about mullet...and he's right!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s something about mullet that makes them attractive to anglers across the disciplines. Although, technically, a saltwater fish they often feed in freshwater, in river estuaries and creeks, where they tend to browse upon algae and tiny organisms among weed beds.


Bread is the preferred bait for us anglers, with their delicate mouths requiring tiny hooks and delicate lines. They are a cunning, tremendously hard-fighting fish; and by both looks and scrap, they are similar in many ways to tropical bonefish.


This ‘crossover’ fish is superb fun to target in the warm summer months, when they shoal in vast numbers close to shore in the warmer, shallow waters. My favourite method of targeting them is with a fly rod – 8wt trout rod, floating line, a floating bead as an indicator float, and a team of flies tied very closely together that resemble maggots or bread - small, white and fluffy. Casting into a frenzied shoal produces instant results.


This is the key to mullet fishing.


Usually, you can’t just turn up and catch them, regardless of whether you see fish cruising by - you need to get them feeding – and this is where it can get messy…


In a bucket, mash together mackerel, cans of tuna, loads of bread, porridge – anything – with water until you have a nice big guts-n’-all bucket of rubby dubby. Feed it into a tight area and, usually, the mullet will turn on and converge on the area en masse.
Mullet patrolling in areas without feed are less likely to be fooled by your single baited hook. They are a clever species, dropping their guard only when heavily baited water whips them into a feeding frenzy.


I decided to put a camera underwater and watch the feeding shoals at one of my favourite mullet venues, Torness Nuclear Power Station in East Lothian, Scotland. The fish are resident throughout summer, and on that particular occasion they were hanging deep in the water.


The footage revealed dozens of fish feeding very close to the seabed. Our baits, high up in the water, were largely ignored and the video provided a lesson to me and I hope you will find it fascinating as well.


Coarse anglers, fly anglers, sea anglers; take out your lightest tackle and target these brilliant fish. They will be around our coasts until September and once you land one you will be hooked on the species for life, I guarantee – just remember to set a light drag!


 

As always I’d love to hear your views, either on the FM forum or in the video’s comment section - You may subscribe to keep up to date HERE

 

 







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Comments (6 posted):

markg on 07/08/2014 12:51:09
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Certainly a fascinating fish. I find a small fly spinner and a baited hook will attract their attention on occasions. I find they tend to feed when it suits them though and often find they do not always respond to ground bait. In the river if you see them swimming around on top, they are often un-catchable. Its when they disappear is the time to watch as they have often then gone down to the bottom to feed. One of the beat fighting fish around I reckon.
nicepix on 07/08/2014 13:14:11
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My favourite species :) Some days you can't go wrong and other days you can't do anything right. Frustratingly fascinating. The problem I have experienced the last two summers is that the heavy rainfall has made the normally clear water murky and spotting them with a view to stalking is nigh on impossible. And I don't go to Cyprus these days where mullet conditions if not their willingness is guaranteed.
Philip on 07/08/2014 21:42:07
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As I kid I used to read they where one of the most frustrating fish and thats certainly been my experience since I started to fish for them. You can go for hours without a sniff then catch 3 in 15mins. Like Markg says...they seem to feed when they want to and thats that ! They seem to be gaining in popularity in recent years....a really good "crossover" sea fish for freshwater anglers to cut their teeth on.
theartist on 10/08/2014 15:25:32
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I managed to catch my first ever mullet this summer at the first attempt although it did take around 3 circuits of the marina i was fishing to get a hittable take. Over the moon i was and it felt like being a kid going fishing for the first time so another mullet addict here. They are very cagey but found i found it was more to do with bankside disturbance than presentation as every time i got some on the feed a local would turn up and tell me how hard they are to catch, standing over me looking over the edge whilst i was crouched like an idiot. There's some irony there i think. Cracking fighters and well worth catching on coarse gear.
nicepix on 10/08/2014 21:23:37
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I managed to catch my first ever mullet this summer at the first attempt although it did take around 3 circuits of the marina i was fishing to get a hittable take. Over the moon i was and it felt like being a kid going fishing for the first time so another mullet addict here. They are very cagey but found i found it was more to do with bankside disturbance than presentation as every time i got some on the feed a local would turn up and tell me how hard they are to catch, standing over me looking over the edge whilst i was crouched like an idiot. There's some irony there i think. Cracking fighters and well worth catching on coarse gear. If you can find a weed raft in the harbour try dropping your bread flake alongside it the gently drawing your float onto the raft so it sits in the weed and stays with it, the bread hanging over the edge of the weed. Sometimes mullet will hide from people under the weed rafts and your bread flake just dangling over the edge might induce a take. Another good place is under boats, but beware of the mooring ropes.
theartist on 11/08/2014 14:16:30
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If you can find a weed raft in the harbour try dropping your bread flake alongside it the gently drawing your float onto the raft so it sits in the weed and stays with it, the bread hanging over the edge of the weed. Sometimes mullet will hide from people under the weed rafts and your bread flake just dangling over the edge might induce a take. Another good place is under boats, but beware of the mooring ropes. Nice one, thanks Nicepix, sounds about right as i saw a few milling around the flotsum so will bear that in mind next time i'm back down the coast


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