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Old 16-07-2004, 09:51
Rog
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Hi all, could anyone let me know what type of equipment I would need for trotting for grayling. The water is the River Frome in Dorset, which is medium paced and comparatively small.
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Old 16-07-2004, 11:12
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a float rod,centrepin reel(if you can afford one),plus some stick floats and chub floats,2lb hooklengths and sweetcorn or maggot as bait,thats what works for me on my local river,apart from the centrepin(which I can`t afford.I make do with a fixed spool loaded with 3lb bs line.
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Old 16-07-2004, 13:38
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i use a simple rig with a chubber float setup and either my closed faced reel or centre pin with either 2to 3lb line and red maggots or corn and sometimes bread flake and either loose fed bait samples or
mashed bread i use the same setup for chubb
as they tend to share the same swims on the
derbyshire derwent where i fish
my chubb & grayling set-up
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Old 16-07-2004, 13:47
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im sorry i forgot to mention i've recantly
added a overview descrition of trotting on my web site which may be worth a view
my site

pluss there's some great info here
&lt;a href"http://www.fishingmagic.com/news/article.asp?SP=&v=3&UAN=2448">great articles</a>
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Old 16-07-2004, 13:53
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the link i messed up to the great articles
is
See Here

i help all this is of some help
(i think i need a nap in a dark room)
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Old 16-07-2004, 14:39
John Hepworth
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A word of warning though Rog. Many riparian/ fishing right owners, at least in the North East and the Borders, do not allow the use of maggot or sweetcorn.
(they say they don't have anything against the coarse angler but,... would they let their daughter marry one?)
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Old 17-07-2004, 18:53
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A good tip would be to add a small swivel (say No.20) 6" above the hooklength.

Grayling are often found in fast streamy water and they scrap hard for their size.

If you don't use the swivel, you'll suffer from line twist.

The line will twist up most of all while retrieving a hook baited with double maggot, especially after along trot.

As far as tackle goes, I use a 15ft match rod, an Abu closed face reel, 4.6lb mainline (treated with a line floatant), the same float and shotting as Chavender suggested, and a size 14 Kamasan B611 Barbless Hook. I would also strongly recommend a pair of waders and a bait smock (or apron).
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Old 17-07-2004, 21:01
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I fish the Frome for grayling as often as possible so this advice might just be useful.
I'm not sure about all stretches of the river, but the water controlled by the local clubs are open to coarse fishers from 1 Nov to the last day of Feb.
The best method, and definately the most enjoyable is trotting. I use a centrepin loaded through with 3lb line, usually to a size 16 hook.Your choice of float will depend on the swim and flow. It can alternate between a light (for a fast flowing river like the Frome) 3 or 4BB to a 4 swan chubber. The Frome is quick to react to weather and rises quickly after rain. It also gets back to fishable conditions after a couple of days without rain. I would definately agree with the earlier tip about waders and a bait bib though I've never thought about the swivel. You decide.
The most prolific bait is maggot. I usually have 2 or 3 on the hook and a red/white combination seems to be best. I've also had success with red worms or corn and these baits often sort out the bigger fish. Long trotting on some swims produces at the beginning or end of the trot for some reason, but always be prepared! Also be prepared for dace, which strangely were absent last season, and the occasional salmon. I don't get out nearly as often I wish my wife and kids would let me, but I hooked into salmon 4 times during my short sessions last season, and with the tackle described above, they certainly give a run for their money! I managed to land 2 and was dead chuffed with that.
Don't forget that the Frome is a small river so be prepared to move swims when bites stop.
I hope this helps. I think my most enjoyable fishing trips have been grayling fishing on the Frome. It is a beautiful river to fish and success or failure it's always a pleasure to be out on its banks.
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Old 18-07-2004, 11:24
Ron Troversial Clay
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I can't really add much more to this thread. Fishing for grayling is true magic. I've have them from the Hants Avon, Wylye, Derbyshire Derwent, upper Swale, Ure, Wharfe and Don (That's right the Don upstream of Sheffield).

Don't for goodness sake put them in a keepnet. Release them immediately and if you want to keep the odd one as they do allow in my part of the world, they are very good eating.
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Old 18-07-2004, 17:07
Rog
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Thanks everyone for your advice, it will certainly help me when I start this Autumn. Good fishing.
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