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River Monsters – Back on TV Next Week

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Jeremy with an Argentinian Freshwater Stingray (Episode 3) Jeremy with an Argentinian Freshwater Stingray (Episode 3)

Angler-adventurer Jeremy Wade tackles the biggest and most dangerous creatures of his 40-year extreme fishing career in the third series of ITV's 'River Monsters' starting on 03 January 2012.

 

 

 

Returning a sawfish, AustraliaThe seven-part series follows Jeremy on a dark and dangerous journey to explore the myths of the deep and reveal that truth is often stranger than fiction. Each episode brings him into close contact with rare predators with potential to kill, from sawfish in Australia to electric eels in Brazil.


The ‘Ball Cutter’ stars in the first episode of the series (The Mutilator, 3 January) in which Wade investigates a spate of bizarre deaths in Papua New Guinea involving a creature that severs and then devours certain body parts of unsuspecting fisherman, leaving them to bleed to death.


As with many in the series, this programme highlights physical changes to the fish, often due to climate and human activity. The Pacu, once vegetarian, was introduced to New Guinea to increase fish stock, but lack of suitable vegetation in the river saw them adapt to meat eating – where their powerful teeth and jaws, originally evolved to crack open nuts, make short work of soft fleshy extremities.


An extreme fisherman for many decades, Wade often knows what fish he’s hooked by the feel of the pull on his line. However he’d never heard of a freshwater stingray, before he started investigating the death of a young girl in Argentina in Silent Assassin (17 Jan).


None of the locals are prepared to fish for the stingray, which they call the ‘River Dog’ One man who Wade meets still bears terrible scars from the wounds which took six years to heal. But after a fierce, four hour battle Wade finally landed the 20-stone monster, which measured 53 inches in diameter and sported two four-inch poisonous barbs on its tail, designed to rip flesh apart before injecting a flesh-rotting venom.


The Suriname Wolf FishIn the remote jungles of Suriname, South America, the biologist encounters a man-eating fish more dangerous than the piranha. After hunting the ‘Wolf Fish’ for more than three weeks he finally hooks one, only to have to fight it out with a caiman for his catch.


Filming this episode also saw the team’s soundman struck by lightning whilst Wade was fishing on a tiny island in the middle of the Corantyne River, two hours' flight time away from any human habitation. Jungle Killer is the last thrilling instalment in the series, airing on 14 February.


Speaking about the new series Jeremy Wade said:


“I’m a pretty experienced fisherman, but this series saw me stretched to my absolute limits... fighting for four hours with a giant, fresh-water sting-ray before finally pulling it ashore was one of the hardest physical challenges of my life. And if you asked me to name the world’s most dangerous fish, piranhas would be pretty high on the list – until now. The Wolf Fish literally has them for breakfast.”


The welfare of the fish is paramount throughout the filming of River Monsters. Hooks specially designed to cause minimum damage to the fish are used and whenever possible, fish are returned to the water as quickly as possible to fight another day.


Jeremy Wade has become a household name in the United States, where he sometimes longs for the seclusion of the planet’s most remote fishing spots, following the runaway success of River Monsters, the most popular show on global TV channel Animal Planet.


River Monsters is on ITV1 at 7.30pm every Tuesday from 3 January to 14 February 2012.


The programmes will then be repeated, as full, one-hour long versions on ITV4 at 9pm every Wednesday from 4 January. The series will also be screened on Discovery UK later in the year.


Series 4 of River Monsters is currently in production.

 







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Comments (31 posted):

beerweasel on 28/12/2011 15:31:14
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Hoorah! I can't wait. :D :w
barbelboi on 28/12/2011 16:24:30
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Yep, Jeremy's series have been consistently good since the first Jungle Hooks series, some 10/11 years ago. Jerry
Tee-Cee on 28/12/2011 17:00:10
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I agree...I like his style and the excellent background work he uses to support the actual catching of the fish. More than anything he comes across as a geniune guy who loves his fishing. Not being a 'Sky' man I have limited access to fishing programmes, and as I cannot stand the other individual who offers a fishing programme (of sorts), Jeremy Wade makes a nice change on cold, wet January nights....
beerweasel on 28/12/2011 17:35:26
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Tonight on "Three men go to New England" BBC2 9.30 the trio try their hand at sport fishing. It won't be much but maybe worth a look.
john step on 29/12/2011 14:07:01
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Hoorah! I can't wait. :D :w You were so right. Three men in a boat fishing was a non event. I was waiting for an anti angling quote such as the one made when Three men in a boat went down the Thames. A carp that has been caught is a "spoilt life". They then proceeded to boil crayfish which were never eaten! Not that I have anything against boiling the clawed nightmares,it's just the priciple.
Tee-Cee on 29/12/2011 17:45:31
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Not too much excitment for the angler then?
barbelboi on 29/12/2011 17:56:45
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Gave it a miss after reading about Griff Rhys Jones in another program (that I also missed) encouraging canoeists and boaters to "disturb as many fishermen as possible" on their travels. Oops, hope I haven’t opened a can of worms with a certain occasional 'poster':eek::wh Jerry
FishingMagic on 29/12/2011 18:38:42
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Well, the press are certainly giving the show some publicity - what a load of balls...
john m h on 29/12/2011 18:39:07
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For what its worth the 'river monsters' series is not my cup of tea, or angling for that matter. As for the nonsense that came from G R-J, I'm sure he will have at least one supporter :rolleyes:
beerweasel on 29/12/2011 19:16:34
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I remember seeing Pacu in the Bournemouth aquarium and thinking they look nasty, but they were meant to be Brazil nut eating veggies. This is what happens when you introduce alien species. As for Rhys-Jones I won't be watching the **** again.
audi on 30/12/2011 13:01:51
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I just don't "get" Jeremy Wade. I've tried to watch most of his stuff, but usually end up annoyed with him; especially the way he treats his guides on film. Surely they don't need to be told three times to "get the net, get the net , get the net". Nor do we need to be told "It's a fish! It's a fish! It's a fish!" every time the rod twitches. I might be doing the guy a dis-service but he ain't my cup o' tea. Thing I found strange was during one episode using a multiplier he persisted in retrieving with the ratchet still on until a hand appeared knocking it off! Funny though; I was never very keen on Matt Hayes either, especially during his "porn star" phase; but after watching Mainstream, and especially with Mick Brown in Rod Race, I really like the bloke now. Not enough detail regarding rigs though, but enough to get me concentrating on what he's doing. He got a lot of bad press from Flyfishers when a couple of articles appeared in one of the fly mags, but I thought he talked good sense and shook things up a bit.
richard bowler on 30/12/2011 13:20:45
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I've been reading the River Monster book over Christmas and must say I've really enjoyed it. Almost as good as my all time favourite read "Somewhere down crazy river" that he wrote with Paul Boote, . The programs are to my mind the most enjoyable fishing programs I've seen, I get bored watching fishing in this country. I was lucky enough to fish with Jeremy in the Amazon in 1998 and I must say he was a really nice bloke. We caught 36 species of fish mostly on lures, eating what we caught including a heron and sleeping in hammocks stretched across an open sided transport boat we called home for the trip. One of the most enjoyable trips I've ever done. All the best Richard - Home
chav professor on 02/01/2012 09:52:04
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I just don't "get" Jeremy Wade. I've tried to watch most of his stuff, but usually end up annoyed with him; especially the way he treats his guides on film. Surely they don't need to be told three times to "get the net, get the net , get the net". Nor do we need to be told "It's a fish! It's a fish! It's a fish!" every time the rod twitches. I might be doing the guy a dis-service but he ain't my cup o' tea. Thing I found strange was during one episode using a multiplier he persisted in retrieving with the ratchet still on until a hand appeared knocking it off! Funny though; I was never very keen on Matt Hayes either, especially during his "porn star" phase; but after watching Mainstream, and especially with Mick Brown in Rod Race, I really like the bloke now. Not enough detail regarding rigs though, but enough to get me concentrating on what he's doing. He got a lot of bad press from Flyfishers when a couple of articles appeared in one of the fly mags, but I thought he talked good sense and shook things up a bit. The reason Jeremy needs to verbalise, 'its a Fish, its a Fish'...... or uses the catch phrase 'fish-on' is to do with the way the production team and equipment work... the Camera used to film wildlife and other forms of film that require a lot of waiting around has a facility to be left running on the subject. the camera captures and stores units of film in five second chunks and then cleverly deletes the passage of time. If you picture your own fishing which at times can involve a lot of waiting around, when the Jeremy has a bite, the 'fish-on' is a verbal prompt to wake the camera man up and run VC. Thus retrieveing the vital 5 seconds that would otherwise have been lost.
Rich Frampton on 02/01/2012 12:28:45
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The reason Jeremy needs to verbalise, 'its a Fish, its a Fish'...... or uses the catch phrase 'fish-on' is to do with the way the production team and equipment work... the Camera used to film wildlife and other forms of film that require a lot of waiting around has a facility to be left running on the subject. the camera captures and stores units of film in five second chunks and then cleverly deletes the passage of time. If you picture your own fishing which at times can involve a lot of waiting around, when the Jeremy has a bite, the 'fish-on' is a verbal prompt to wake the camera man up and run VC. Thus retrieveing the vital 5 seconds that would otherwise have been lost. That is really interesting Prof........ I have often wondered how you could film hours of inactivity and not end up with wasted film/memory.You have explained it!! Cheers. I was thinking of how to film a barbel take on a pin without literally having to run a camcorder for all the time. I can see now that I am not going to beable to do it without inducing a take with a dropper. Anyway...back on track....I am looking forward to the new series very much.
Steve Pope on 02/01/2012 12:40:23
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That's pretty much how Bob filmed the 'pin take on the dvd I had the good fortune to help out on. Clever stuff. Have much respect for anyone who goes on film because its nowhwere near as easy as some might think! Jeremy Wade has a good style and Matt Hayes is a great presenter imo.
john m h on 02/01/2012 20:09:46
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That is really interesting Prof........ I have often wondered how you could film hours of inactivity and not end up with wasted film/memory.You have explained it!! Cheers. There's an old guy who does barbel fishing video's on the Swale; he must spend a fortune on memory and batteries recording 'barbel fishing inactivity'
beerweasel on 10/01/2012 17:02:17
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Tonight: Jeremy hunts down an 8 ft creature in the rivers of NZ. I'd laugh if it turns out to be a f****** Otter. :w
Alan Tyler on 10/01/2012 21:03:11
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Just seen the long-finned eel programme -New Zealand. Well, I'm not going paddling there!
peter crabtree on 10/01/2012 21:46:49
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To get an angling show on a major TV channel these days it has to be entertaining . It was.....
simon dunbar on 10/01/2012 22:01:46
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Great show and great book. So many boring Carp videos and programmes , River Monsters is a breath of fresh air . Exotic venues , species of fish we haven't seen before and wild fishing , I really enjoy the show. Also a lot of non anglers enjoy the programme which helps keep fishing on mainstream T.V., which is good.
Lord Paul of Sheffield on 11/01/2012 16:11:53
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good to see any new fishing programme on TV
dangermouse on 11/01/2012 16:23:19
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good to see any new fishing programme on TV Yup, especially on regular TV. Unfortunately for me I`ve already seen this series. Having said that I`ll enjoy watching them again.
itsfishingnotcatching on 11/01/2012 16:24:55
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Interesting programme and I like his style, if I had one small criticism it would be the staged re-enactments of previous events, i.e. Pacu castrating fisherman and eels dragging off young girl that aside good programme and a good advert for fishing IMHO.
syhaze on 19/01/2012 11:58:04
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why are itv1 cutting these down to 23min episodes though? they showed the full length ep of the NZ eels on ITV4 the following night, but not so for this week's a real shame as the full length episodes really allow all the extra details that Jeremy crams in to the shows. 23min is just not enough imo
dangermouse on 11/04/2012 18:45:48
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Just watched the first two episodes of series 4. First episode was filmed in the USA, bullsharks, garr and catfish. I suspect Ron will like the second episode as Jeremy is searching for a pirahna like predator in the Okavango Delta. Good stuff as always.
peter crabtree on 11/04/2012 21:14:52
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[ I suspect Ron will like the second episode as Jeremy is searching for a pirahna like predator in the Okavango Delta. . I think he had 300 in one day on goo .....
Paul Boote on 11/04/2012 22:34:24
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Let us not confuse mere much-sold, Shock! Horror! Media Hype / Fantasy with Actual Reality: the critters concerned are merely already much-fished-for, bog-standard, run-of-the-mill tigerfish. I can say that, having caught a good many of them, more on fly than on bait, and not got t1ts out about them, they're fast and briefly swift and powerful but really nothing to get your professional PR spinners going. Depends on what you want you want from Angling and what you are prepared to believe, I suppose....
dangermouse on 11/04/2012 22:54:21
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Let us not confuse mere much-sold, Shock! Horror! Media Hype / Fantasy with Actual Reality: I wasn`t . . . I was just attempting to maintain the mystery for those that haven`t seen the show or read about it. :doh:
Paul Boote on 11/04/2012 23:03:43
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There we go, danger' - some do, others merely hype.
dangermouse on 11/04/2012 23:21:49
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There we go, danger' - some do, others merely hype. Alternatively Paul - Some show consideration, others merely spoil . . .
Paul Boote on 11/04/2012 23:27:16
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Some of the latter do that, danger', and never - ever - stop. Capisce?


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