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Michael Gove Urged to Save Environmental Education

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Education Secretary, Michael Gove is being urged to keep environmental education in the National Curriculum Education Secretary, Michael Gove is being urged to keep environmental education in the National Curriculum

The Angling Trust has expressed its concern about proposals by the Education Secretary Michael Gove to remove requirements to teach pupils about the need for conservation of the environment.

 

 

 

 

 


The representative body for anglers is encouraging its members to respond to the Government's current consultation and to call for the National Curriculum to continue to require that pupils are taught at Key Stage 1 to care for the environment; and at Key Stage 2 about ways in which living things and the environment need protection.


An understanding of the natural environment from an early age is important to reduce antisocial and environmentally damaging behaviour in young people such as leaving litter, which often blights the water environment. It is also vital to provide students with an early knowledge base on which they could build careers as environmental scientists in the future. Early engagement with the natural world also encourages young people to explore the great outdoors and makes them less apprehensive about getting into fishing.


Environmental education also complements the wide range of programmes on offer from the voluntary sector to use angling as a tool to help young people to learn about the wider consequences of pollution and encourage environmental stewardship.

 
Mark Lloyd, Chief Executive of the Angling Trust said:


"At a time when the human race faces unprecedented environmental challenges, it would be perverse to drop requirements to give the next generation the foundations they need to build solutions to problems such as low flows in rivers, pollution, habitat damage and collapsing marine fish stocks. The Prime Minister promised that this would be the greenest government ever, but proposals such as this fly in the face of that claim. An understanding of the natural environment is also vital if we are to encourage young people to get into healthy, inspiring and adventurous outdoor activities such as fishing."


The consultation PDF is available to read HERE and the ATr is suggesting concerned anglers respond by sending an e-mail to:  NationalCurriculum.CONSULTATION@education.gsi.gov.uk


The ATr suggest the following response:


Dear Sir/Madam,

I am responding to Question 3 of the consultation on the National Curriculum in England Framework document:  Do you have any comments on the content set out in the draft programmes of study?


I am very concerned that the proposed curriculum has removed any reference to teaching pupils about the need for conservation of the environment. In particular I believe the National Curriculum should continue to require that pupils are taught at Key Stage 1 to care for the environment; and at Key Stage 2 about ways in which living things and the environment need protection.

Yours faithfully,

[Insert your name and postcode]







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Comments (40 posted):

chav professor on 12/04/2013 16:15:55
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I was going to write something...... then something stopped me..... Can't be bothered. That man is a complete ar$e.... Latin, classics and bu**ing in the cloakrooms. He wants to make public school education open to all. Oh, apart from the smaller class sizes, distinct class differences etc etc... STOP CHAV..... STOPPPP!
jacksharp on 12/04/2013 20:11:17
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Chinless, bed-wetting, mummy's boy. Right, I'll get off the fence now! :wh
Titus on 12/04/2013 20:59:17
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Who exactly voted for this lot?
Fred Bonney on 12/04/2013 21:56:38
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Those that didn't vote!!
chav professor on 13/04/2013 07:22:03
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Those that didn't vote!! Fred, I accept the sacrifices people have made in order to live in a democracy. Other than the big 2 1/2 parties.... all that is left is right wing extremists... There is no one i consider deserving enough of my vote. Its not apathy that directs the choice not to vote - its a conscience and ethical standpoint.
Fred Bonney on 13/04/2013 07:29:59
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All very well Chav but we got lumbered with this lot because of you and your's consciences and ethics!!;)
chav professor on 13/04/2013 07:56:08
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All very well Chav but we got lumbered with this lot because of you and your's consciences and ethics!!;) The last lot weren't any better... I quite like the tory rebranding of what really are greedy, rich ba$tards.... Wealth creators and and the top end 'strivers'... Gosh, if immoral tax evasion and immoral bonuses rewarding the economic genius's were tackled - all this 'obvious' talent would head to some other failing global economy - yea right... with open arms... Its funny how the 'top enders' have always been cushioned from the effects of economic hardship. Its Feckless work shy teachers, single mothers, immigration and shirkers that got this country in this state - not to mention all those 'spare' bedrooms. I could read this in the papers in a daily basis. Its not that I don't like the newspapers... they are great for wrapping bait in and keeping lug and rag worm fresh for a fishing session - keep 'em coming :). I would just add... there is a new 'upstairs, downstairs Downton abby drama' being played out....it's subtly different... but its there all the same. By the time I am 70 and due to retire from my teaching post... I will do so with a warm glow that I did my bit to claw this country out of this mess.
Fred Bonney on 13/04/2013 08:25:10
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Yeh, yeh but not everybody reads the Daily Mail. But, if those who could vote used their votes when they should have, this lot and the lot before may not have got in, and perhaps those that did would have needed to listen to those who voted them in. As it stands, the government of the day will always have the non voters as an excuse, as they are the elected choice.
chav professor on 13/04/2013 08:31:52
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May elections... Labour - new Tory Conservative - Tory Lib Dems - Tory/whatever you want them to be. UKIP - Torys gone mad BNP - Brown shirts I'm beginning to think David Icke is right Reptilian Agenda - David Icke Website Were being run by shape shifting reptilians The reptilians need feeding off with ever increasing amounts of wealth.... just leaves less and less for everyone else.
cg74 on 13/04/2013 09:59:57
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Okay chaps, can we keep the Party Politics out of this and maybe concentrate on the Environmental side of the issue instead? Peter, I agree but was it not obvious to whomever placed this news article, that leaving up for debate, it can/will only follow one course....
Peter Jacobs on 13/04/2013 10:02:38
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Okay chaps, can we keep the Party Politics out of this and maybe concentrate on the Environmental side of the issue instead? ---------- Post added at 11:02 ---------- Previous post was at 10:46 ---------- Peter, I agree but was it not obvious to whomever placed this news article, that leaving up for debate, it can/will only follow one course.. Yes, it was pretty obvious but the real issue is the environmental one and not party politics. We have allowed some leeway because of the obvious association, but let's try to concentrate on the important issue and how it may, or may not, affect our sport
Paul Boote on 13/04/2013 11:32:05
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And I remember the lovely Miss Judith Grinsome taking my western edge of London primary school classes on weekly Nature Walks, "dahn the Moor" (Middx. Colne Valley), collecting leaves, flowers (mostly weeds), seeds and catkins, bugs, sticklebacks and tadpoles, then taking the seething mass back to the big Nature Table in each of the little classrooms. I understand that Mr Gove is wanting to take us back to the 1950s and early 1960s, education-wise ... hmm ... seems to have lost the Greek Tragic plot somewhere... And so have I - I really shouldn't be here. Ta-ta.
chav professor on 13/04/2013 14:28:28
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And I remember the lovely Miss Judith Grinsome taking my western edge of London primary school classes on weekly Nature Walks, "dahn the Moor" (Middx. Colne Valley), collecting leaves, flowers (mostly weeds), seeds and catkins, bugs, sticklebacks and tadpoles, then taking the seething mass back to the big Nature Table in each of the little classrooms. I understand that Mr Gove is wanting to take us back to the 1950s and early 1960s, education-wise ... hmm ... seems to have lost the Greek Tragic plot somewhere... And so have I - I really shouldn't be here. Ta-ta. What hope would a primary school have of meeting its KS2 targets?... Time wasted on nature walks is time wasted on coaching kids - they have to perform to meet government stats. I would hate to be a child going through school today. I too fondly remember the Nature table. We had a Teacher who shared with us her passion for nature. Her favourite thing was fungi - stink caps, ink caps, a huge puff ball.. Mr Boote, ever welcome..
flightliner on 13/04/2013 14:58:13
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I think that Gove is trying to make some attempt at regaining lost ground. For years now there has been a tendency in education to introduce a wider ,more embracing learning scenario that many (I suppose me included) now feel has been a failure -- we see young people entering uni who need to beef up there knowledge of the three "Rs" and elsewhere-- say in FE - students entering for courses where, say, reading drawings in engineering, building etx cant even read or add up (dont get me going about NVQs-- please--- Not Very Qualified). Back in the seventies/early eighties such a situation was almost unheard of but since the wishy washy extra subjects began to creep into the school ed system along with constant changes heralded by governments (16 white papers in the twelve years my daughter was in school) it really began to make itself obvious that it needed some sort of re-dress. Maybe Gove will make a cock up in his attempts at reforms but I hope ,for everybodies sake that he succeeds.
guest39 on 13/04/2013 15:15:43
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If Michael Gove really cared about education he'd resign.
flightliner on 13/04/2013 15:28:44
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If Michael Gove really cared about education he'd resign. But there,s the rub BR , they never do, bankers, health execs, MPs etx. If the instigator is or seems genuine in their attempts/intentions I can go along some way to accepting the odd small failure along the way (we all make them from time to time) sad as it is its possible to correct. Its when the failure is massive -- like the EU for example that its hard to forgive. Whatever ones impressions are of Gove I understand he had a very hard beginning in life and I wish him well with his undertakings.
guest39 on 13/04/2013 15:41:56
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Whatever ones impressions are of Gove I understand he had a very hard beginning in life and I wish him well with his undertakings. I accept this last bit but he's gone on to a 'career' (of sorts) I don't think that its right to refer to his roots once in office - if he's poor, in my view he is, he's poor. I'd also prefer him to return to being a journalist - that said, if he went he'd be replaced by someone who is equally effete.
flightliner on 13/04/2013 16:19:13
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I accept this last bit but he's gone on to a 'career' (of sorts) I don't think that its right to refer to his roots once in office - if he's poor, in my view he is, he's poor. BR, from what I,ve read of the guy its his hard beginnings that maybe enthused him with the desire to get the best out of the education system prevailing at the time which is why I referred to them. Maybe knowing how it worked for him (?) is possibly the reason he wants to divert students to what he believes will be more beneficial for them in the future. I agree with you wholeheartedly tho that for someone like me it is only a career "of sorts" Love em or hate em tho they are,nt going away.:D
chav professor on 13/04/2013 16:23:01
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I think that Gove is trying to make some attempt at regaining lost ground. For years now there has been a tendency in education to introduce a wider ,more embracing learning scenario that many (I suppose me included) now feel has been a failure -- we see young people entering uni who need to beef up there knowledge of the three "Rs" and elsewhere-- say in FE - students entering for courses where, say, reading drawings in engineering, building etx cant even read or add up (dont get me going about NVQs-- please--- Not Very Qualified). Back in the seventies/early eighties such a situation was almost unheard of but since the wishy washy extra subjects began to creep into the school ed system along with constant changes heralded by governments (16 white papers in the twelve years my daughter was in school) it really began to make itself obvious that it needed some sort of re-dress. Maybe Gove will make a cock up in his attempts at reforms but I hope ,for everybodies sake that he succeeds. Education is a political football. It has been tweaked and fannied about with. I have to agree - a lot of the IMPOSED new culture of teaching and learning is emperors new clothes.... Its not teachers that have been getting it wrong. i do my job and deliver in the way it needs to be delivered - in effect tweaking my teaching to fit the new criteria as set down by what an excellent lesson looks like (what ever the f*** that is..lol). I left school with two GCSE's (impossible in todays education system) - I wasn't thick or stupid. I did address my education in later life - not through wishy washy rubbish - just hard work, graft and plenty of support from what I guess you could call an SEN co-ordinator in the FE system. As a 12 -15 year old student - would I have attended a support group to help me with maths? Hell no.... Could I have been taught how to use a PC as a tool to address fundamental problems with literacy? Didn't have a PC then. I further did an access course to get on the Degree course I wished to study - it was the best preparation I could ever have wished for - it gave me the tools for the job! even got a 2:1 I don't know, I hope someone sorts it out - If its michael Gove - perhaps it would be nice to have the roll of teaching recognized as a profession. Would be even nicer if teachers were not made to feel they contributed to the perceived failing of an education system by the political media. I love my job - but I'm tired, bored and demoralized by the politics and fear imposed by the ever impending OFSTED inspection. Yes the holidays are great... BUT I went part time... Couldn't keep up with the increasing expectations at the expense of a family life and time to do things - Like FISHING:D The natural world is a great 'hook' to inspire young minds - thats why i have a lab full of stuffed animals, skulls, fossils, birds wings - even brought in peeling crabs, grass snakes, crickets, locusts and a whole host of other stuff - that I'm always being reminded I'm not allowed to as it has to come from a recognized source or some rubbish. Anyway, how can you have a Michael Gove article - and leave the politics out:D
flightliner on 13/04/2013 17:13:28
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Sock on Chav,I left school at fifteen, started an apprenticeship and went to night school for twelve years-- hated it at first but then grew to enjoy it. All while holding a job down on building sites around the vicinity that made it hard to attend but always did . I went a little further than most craftworkers gaining an Hnc in construction and ultimately applying for a place in a Teacher training college. I obtained my first teaching post in FE at thirty rears of age-- loved it-- but the last ten years was belittled with never ending visits from inspectors telling me how to do my job-- one of em was about twenty four and had never even taught.:omg::omg::omg: NVQ = Not Very Qualified, the sooner Mr Gove kicks those into touch the better.:D
jacksharp on 13/04/2013 18:41:19
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Education is a political football. It has been tweaked and fannied about with. I have to agree - a lot of the IMPOSED new culture of teaching and learning is emperors new clothes.... Its not teachers that have been getting it wrong. i do my job and deliver in the way it needs to be delivered - in effect tweaking my teaching to fit the new criteria as set down by what an excellent lesson looks like (what ever the f*** that is..lol). I left school with two GCSE's (impossible in todays education system) - I wasn't thick or stupid. I did address my education in later life - not through wishy washy rubbish - just hard work, graft and plenty of support from what I guess you could call an SEN co-ordinator in the FE system. As a 12 -15 year old student - would I have attended a support group to help me with maths? Hell no.... Could I have been taught how to use a PC as a tool to address fundamental problems with literacy? Didn't have a PC then. I further did an access course to get on the Degree course I wished to study - it was the best preparation I could ever have wished for - it gave me the tools for the job! even got a 2:1 I don't know, I hope someone sorts it out - If its michael Gove - perhaps it would be nice to have the roll of teaching recognized as a profession. Would be even nicer if teachers were not made to feel they contributed to the perceived failing of an education system by the political media. I love my job - but I'm tired, bored and demoralized by the politics and fear imposed by the ever impending OFSTED inspection. Yes the holidays are great... BUT I went part time... Couldn't keep up with the increasing expectations at the expense of a family life and time to do things - Like FISHING:D The natural world is a great 'hook' to inspire young minds - thats why i have a lab full of stuffed animals, skulls, fossils, birds wings - even brought in peeling crabs, grass snakes, crickets, locusts and a whole host of other stuff - that I'm always being reminded I'm not allowed to as it has to come from a recognized source or some rubbish. Anyway, how can you have a Michael Gove article - and leave the politics out:D Education has had more than it's fair share of lame, ineffective Secretaries, Thatcher, Keith Joseph, Fred Mulley, Shirley Williams, Kenneth Baker, David Blunkett, Estelle Morris, Gove and the list goes on. Seems the best was the first incumbent (to be called Secretary of State for Education) a certain Mr R A Butler. Now it's a job for second-raters and EVERY one of them has to impose their will on the system and turn everything upside-down to make their mark. I have lost track of the "wonderful" initiatives - the Initial Teaching Alphabet in the 70's, Open Plan Teaching and the Integrated Day in the 80's then Back To Basics, now it's Child-Centred Learning, where every child in a class has to have an Individual Learning Plan, and the job just keeps getting harder. As for OFSTED, don't get me started on that gang of w*nkers. There's a Bullies Charter in schools nowadays and head teachers can pretty much do what they like in the name of improving standards and being answerable to the Governing Body. Jeez, am I glad I am retired!!!
The bad one on 13/04/2013 20:32:30
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Okay chaps, can we keep the Party Politics out of this and maybe concentrate on the Environmental side of the issue instead? ---------- Post added at 11:02 ---------- Previous post was at 10:46 ---------- Yes, it was pretty obvious but the real issue is the environmental one and not party politics. We have allowed some leeway because of the obvious association, but let's try to concentrate on the important issue and how it may, or may not, affect our sport It was always ever going to be so Peter! Bullingdon Club boy says, "We will be the Greenest Government EVER!" Gove now wants to drop Environmental subjects from the curriculum? So how will this current crop of school students get the education, skills and jobs in the “green” industries Bullingdon Club boy promised his government would be if the subject is not taught to them? They won’t and well be back in the cycle of employers whinging and moaning the country doesn’t have skills base taught at basic leave for their industries to prosper in this country. And the idiot responsible for this will be Gove! Now if I’m being cynical I’d suggest that educating kids in Envo subjects frightens them, because not only do those taught such subjects read what’s on the tin, they understand what’s in the tin and what went in it to make it tin. And from their point of view that kind of knowledge is dangerous for ordinary people to have because they question what they are being told by them as true based on the knowledge they have gained from the education in that field. Gove's philosophy, a failed journo, not an educator, is predicated on learning by route and he’s said that. That type of education fails, has been shown to fail and been discredited because there is no room for critical analysis and creative thinking. "It is the word of God, so it must be true and correct." Well I’ve news for Gove, it ain’t! And the wealth of evidence suggest that creationism only exists in his mind.
Paul Boote on 13/04/2013 20:41:12
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Reply to jacksharp: Yes. A political nightmare. You are best out of it, Jack'. I caught up with a bit of semi-ancient history about my senior school (a perfectly private madhouse, then and now) the other day, looking at what had happened to its once-wonderful Museum (a place I had haunted as a mid-teenager) - Charterhouse treasures go to auction as academics rail | UK news | The Guardian - after a Dead Old Boy - Sir Ronald Millar | Herald Scotland - a pen for hire who who had once written summat about "not turning" for someone left a legacy in his Will to the School Library, then gave up, vowing to keep an ever-sharp and very clear mind and always always to keep learning and not have anyone do my thinking for me.
jacksharp on 13/04/2013 20:48:02
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I don't think I was kicking the sacred cow of party politics since the list of incompetents I named were from Labour and the Tories. As someone at the sharp end of education I reserve the right to name and blame the people who did their best to blight my career from 1972 to 2009. As for the one who stole the infants' milk... :wh
Paul Boote on 13/04/2013 22:15:25
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I don't think I was kicking the sacred cow of party politics since the list of incompetents I named were from Labour and the Tories. As someone at the sharp end of education I reserve the right to name and blame the people who did their best to blight my career from 1972 to 2009. As for the one who stole the infants' milk... :wh Forget sacred cows, politicks, old-style f8rty-parties 'n' all, for a sec', jack'. The guys who really pull the strings - the people with Old Style Educashion ("We don't need it, but it helps...") and Connections and Invitations (but who, in my own case, "So kind, thank you ... but no thanks ... I'd rather be myself and just go fishing") - just carry on as usual. Think about it (some types, similar to myself yet totally unlike me, don't need to, they just go for perpetual and now increasingly desperate, burn the lot, enemy within, war).
chav professor on 14/04/2013 07:03:50
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Dunno what half that meant - but it sounded good....:confused: A great retort on teaching and differentiation from that great orator - Mickey Flanagan. [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKLaFusuQck]Micky Flanagan on Teaching and Differentiation - YouTube[/ame]
jacksharp on 14/04/2013 08:11:39
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Ah, differentiation! Make the goal much bigger, move the finish line much nearer, but wait till you get into the reality of the big, wide adult world then see where differentiation is!
flightliner on 14/04/2013 16:13:10
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Ah, differentiation! Make the goal much bigger, move the finish line much nearer, but wait till you get into the reality of the big, wide adult world then see where differentiation is! Job vacencies in Times Ed jack?;)
Paul Boote on 15/04/2013 07:16:27
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The heck to the Environment, let them play Fives (I did, never did me any harm...) Eton Fives becomes a state school hit - Telegraph
Peter Jacobs on 15/04/2013 11:52:26
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The heck to the Environment, let them play Fives (I did, never did me any harm...) Eton Fives becomes a state school hit - Telegraph Me neither, except we played Rugby Fives The problem being is when you left school and tred to continue playing you found that there were few, if any, public courts around.
Paul Boote on 15/04/2013 12:38:02
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Same with big-court, hard-ball, lethally fast and near personally deadly at times Racquets - [ame="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rackets_%28sport%29"]Rackets (sport) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame] I became a pretty handy squash player as a result...
Titus on 15/04/2013 17:44:03
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Reply to jacksharp: Yes. A political nightmare. You are best out of it, Jack'. I caught up with a bit of semi-ancient history about my senior school (a perfectly private madhouse, then and now) the other day, looking at what had happened to its once-wonderful Museum (a place I had haunted as a mid-teenager) - Charterhouse treasures go to auction as academics rail | UK news | The Guardian - after a Dead Old Boy - Sir Ronald Millar | Herald Scotland - a pen for hire who who had once written summat about "not turning" for someone left a legacy in his Will to the School Library, then gave up, vowing to keep an ever-sharp and very clear mind and always always to keep learning and not have anyone do my thinking for me. Did that fancy school of yours not teach you about full stops Paul? Or were you off playing with your balls that day? ---------- Post added at 17:44 ---------- Previous post was at 17:39 ---------- Stands back and waits for a Rumpelstiltskin type rage.
chav professor on 15/04/2013 17:57:16
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Did that fancy school of yours not teach you about full stops Paul? Or were you off playing with your balls that day? ---------- Post added at 17:44 ---------- Previous post was at 17:39 ---------- Stands back and waits for a Rumpelstiltskin type rage. Probably get a bare bottom birching in Sirs private office for such an offence;)
Paul Boote on 15/04/2013 18:35:34
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Did that fancy school of yours not teach you about full stops Paul? Or were you off playing with your balls that day? ---------- Post added at 17:44 ---------- Previous post was at 17:39 ---------- Stands back and waits for a Rumpelstiltskin type rage. No, the ever wind-up, niggled Titus. When you know how to write, you can do what the eff you like with punctuation. Cue: Rentamob; cue "Oh! What arrogance!" Tetons.
flightliner on 15/04/2013 19:19:16
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a pen for hire who who had once written summat about "not turning" for someone Paul, not cocking a snook at you but I had to smile at that!. Was it the same guy that wrote the riddles for Ted Rodgers in his tv show "Dusty Bin?. nb, the qoute is by PB not Titus.
chav professor on 15/04/2013 19:35:45
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[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfGMYdalClU]MAN - YouTube[/ame] Times are hard, perhaps diminished environmental awareness may give the impetus required for economic growth in these austere times...
Titus on 15/04/2013 21:04:39
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Too easy..........
Paul Boote on 15/04/2013 21:40:54
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And just too predictable and tedious and destructive to Angling and to Angling websites on your own part, Titus. No wonder that the real quality people and Anglers think "Why bother with trash?" and just 'flounce' (popular word when it comes to me), huh? Till the next time, Fishing Magic.
chav professor on 16/04/2013 17:19:20
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Same with big-court, hard-ball, lethally fast and near personally deadly at times Racquets - Rackets (sport) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia I became a pretty handy squash player as a result... That other great Etonian - Bruce lee - Playing Nunchuc ping pong! [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZelkRV5fJg]Bruce Lee Ping Pong - YouTube[/ame]
Paul Boote on 16/04/2013 17:54:42
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Now that's fast. Racquets is actually a much physically slower game than Squash, by the way, but the speed of the small hard ball coming off the wall or an opponent's racquet is unbelievable. If you are hit by the ball (imagine someone putting a 1.5-inch conker into a big wrist-rocket catapult then firing it at you at close range), it HURTS. Get hit on the head and you can be spark-out poleaxed. Preferred far faster, huge sweat, Squash myself - more skill to play well and far better exercise. Racquets is pretty good though, and quite "grand" - the "clack" of the ball coming off the wall then coming at head-height at you...


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