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Christchurch AC Lose Hants Avon ‘Jewel in the Crown’

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Playing a big fish in the shadow of Ibsley Bridge - one of the many iconic venues on the Somerley Estate Playing a big fish in the shadow of Ibsley Bridge - one of the many iconic venues on the Somerley Estate

Following months of speculation it has now been confirmed that Christchurch AC is to lose its fishing rights on the Somerley Estate.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Source: Salisbury Journal / Karen Bate

 

The Salisbury Journal reports that:

Rumours had been circulating for some time among anglers, that the fishing lease belonging to Christchurch Angling Club could be terminated at the end of the year and on Tuesday last week the rumours were confirmed by Somerley Estate.


An estate spokesman said:

 “Unfortunately the lease renewal did not reach a satisfactory conclusion and we are taking it back in hand and will possibly run it in house with a couple of syndicates.”


The club, which was formed 75 years ago, has more than 1,500 members who fish on stretches of the Dorset Stour and Hampshire Avon. However it is believed members will be left bitterly disappointed to have to stop fishing on the popular lakes, the main river and the streams and carriers at Somerley.


One fisherman, who did not wish to be named, said:

“I have heard that the estate has given 12 months’ notice to terminate the lease to fish on the lake and the river that runs through the grounds.

I believe the decision is purely financial and could be because the estate could make more money if they leased the lake and their river to a syndicate.

The other option is that they ask the angling club for more money to fish each year.”


Secretary of Christchurch Angling Club Stephen Jenner said:

“We are keen to keep fishing at Somerley Estate and have fishing rights here until the end of the year, which are guaranteed, but we are in negotiations with the estate for next year.”


On the Christchurch Angling Club website it stated:

‘To allow our members to read the full details on the lease negotiations with the Somerley Estate, the committee intend to publish all documents and emails that were sent and received from the estate during our discussions, together with excerpts from the relevant committee meetings held during this time.

The subject will also be the main topic at the annual meeting in June, when we will endeavour to answer any questions that may arise as fully as possible.’

 







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Comments (29 posted):

tiinker on 02/02/2014 17:59:14
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A sign of the times fishing leases are no longer cheap and they are shorter than ever these days. It is a big headache for clubs these days. Even run of the mill waters are getting more expensive . Top line waters fetch top line prices and some one is always prepared to pay it .
mick b on 02/02/2014 20:18:29
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..............
the blanker on 02/02/2014 20:46:40
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A previous post on this subject provides the view of the Somerly Estate. From memory, it stated that CAC hadn't kept to their side of the lease by caring for the banks and dealing with the litter problem so the Estate were forced to do it themselves. Certainly, if I was the Estate manager I wouldn't let the fishing to any club, whatever the history behind it. A closed, and tightly controlled syndicate is the only way to protect a fishery and be assured that it is fully respected by the angling members. I believe the water is to go syndicate, and from what I know you are correct about the club not keeping to their side, it had as far as I know nothing to do with money, how many have renewed their ticket while being unaware of this I wonder.
tiinker on 02/02/2014 20:54:00
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A previous post on this subject provides the view of the Somerly Estate. From memory, it stated that CAC hadn't kept to their side of the lease by caring for the banks and dealing with the litter problem so the Estate were forced to do it themselves. Certainly, if I was the Estate manager I wouldn't let the fishing to any club, whatever the history behind it. A closed, and tightly controlled syndicate is the only way to protect a fishery and be assured that it is fully respected by the angling members. Very true our club water is very well looked after and our landlord has just renewed our lease for another 15 years and it get inspected at random several times a year the landlords staff have their own keys and come and go as they please. So everything has to be just so. Rules are strict and this new lease will take us to 100 years the club has held this water it has always been fenced and private.
the blanker on 02/02/2014 21:01:38
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A "special meeting" has been called for 7th March to discuss the Somerly lease.
mick b on 23/11/2014 11:07:25
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............
Paul Boote on 23/11/2014 11:52:10
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No comment from me here about this particular matter (though I did have an open invitation to fish Somerley for both coarse fish and very occasionally for "Hand the body over to me, Paul" salmon from keeper Colonel Crow when I was a kid and well into my teens). But then that's how it was then - top fisheries with a handful of rods and countless other lesser waters available for pence or for free to those whose accents weren't right, whose pockets weren't deep enough. The number of the latter you'd see out fishing at weekends was amazing. The future, though? Hmm. The future will be bleak for Angling as done by the vital many (who'll buy all the juicy kit, the floats, the leads, the maggots and pellets, the currently suddenly fashionable soft baits...?) if everything goes big ticket and syndicate -: a very few very well-fished chiefs and absolutely no hollering lads on their coloured ponies to support and defend them and make it all possible. Not good, except for the few who can buy themselves a little piece of "paradise" then pull up the drawbridge.
floatfish on 23/11/2014 12:23:35
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Some very good waters have gone syndicate over the years,some for financial reason and many others due to bad management by clubs and hooligan elements causing grief. Farmers being threatened on their own land.! It's a sign of the times . Some clubs run waters very well and well policed, these will at least keep some decent affordable fishing for the majority to enjoy.
Judas Priest on 23/11/2014 18:07:11
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[QUOTE=Paul Boote if everything goes big ticket and syndicate -:. Nothing at all wrong with syndicated waters, if clubs and individuals choose to either break the rules or not adhere to their side of the contract then losing them is their fault no one else's. Not all syndicates are based purely on a monetary value but more on knowing who is fishing and when and more importantly knowing you can trust the members.
Paul Boote on 23/11/2014 19:52:44
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Definitely not about money, some of them. One very reasonably priced trout club / syndicate that I was invited to join after two years of on-bank fishing invitation vetting by its Chairman, a member of the banking family with whom the Royals and most of Britain's and Europe's aristocracy once banked (think Stourhead....) included most of the top brass of the military and the judiciary plus trout-scaring 6' 5", Telegraph / Evening Standard / eminent war historian Max Hastings. Quite a crew. Very exclusive, yet few members, even back then, were not unaware that our lovely few miles of trout streams could exist in some both geographical and time bubble if all the waters and country around us were being neglected and allowed to go to the wall, and Anglers and Angling of every type going with them - many of those great and good old boys had waters of their own (on a family farm or an Estate) and let them to local coarse clubs at peppercorn rents and handed out the prizes and cups (which they themselves had often donated) at their AGMs and Christmas dinners. Noblesse oblige (the obligation of the nobility to those less lofty than themselves) is what the above used to be called. I see a lot less of it now (thank goodness - the feudal era is well and truly over), but little philanthropic and constructive from the new breed of syndicated and exclusive club fishers to replace it, to put something back - more worried about the weights of their fish, the beauty of their lightly trodden patch and the company that they keep. A monoculture, in short, surely destined to go the way the Irish potato went in 1845. Just a few thoughts from me, not holy writ.
nicepix on 23/11/2014 21:02:56
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So we are back to you again :rolleyes:
Ray Daywalker Clarke on 23/11/2014 21:04:50
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Round here a few clubs have got together to run waters, rather than let them be lost to angling. The Consortium of clubs is very well run, you just join anyone of the clubs, and apart from that clubs own waters, you get to fish the Consortiums waters that all the clubs run. This might sound strange to some, but the cost of a club ticket hasn't gone up by more than £5 over the last few years. many were saying the waters will be over fished, and you would never get a swim. Just the opposite, the anglers I see on these waters are the same faces that fished them before. Yes there are new faces around the waters, but you get that with all clubs. This may be the way for clubs to go if times get hard.
Paul Boote on 23/11/2014 21:08:03
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So we are back to you again :rolleyes: And you on me. Get over your online Tourette's, Nicepix - you're clogging up a forum that is going some way towards being one on which fishing of all types can be discussed without fear of attack by some Surly ExPat Troll.
nicepix on 23/11/2014 21:17:29
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Round here a few clubs have got together to run waters, rather than let them be lost to angling. The Consortium of clubs is very well run, you just join anyone of the clubs, and apart from that clubs own waters, you get to fish the Consortiums waters that all the clubs run. This might sound strange to some, but the cost of a club ticket hasn't gone up by more than £5 over the last few years. many were saying the waters will be over fished, and you would never get a swim. Just the opposite, the anglers I see on these waters are the same faces that fished them before. Yes there are new faces around the waters, but you get that with all clubs. This may be the way for clubs to go if times get hard. I think that is the way forward. There are some waters that could be lost to angling without any sad loss, but the ones that matter should be secured even if it means a joint ownership.
greenie62 on 23/11/2014 22:11:10
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Round here a few clubs have got together to run waters, rather than let them be lost to angling. The Consortium of clubs is very well run, you just join anyone of the clubs, and apart from that clubs own waters, you get to fish the Consortiums waters that all the clubs run...... This may be the way for clubs to go if times get hard. This sounds like the way to go in many areas - particularly to protect smaller/local clubs and waters from predation by larger clubs to boost their 'catalogue' of waters - and make them more marketable - "...Und morgen die ganze Welt" (... and tomorrow the whole world)! When the large club relinquishes the water a few years later the local clubs have been dissolved and the RO finds he can't get the exorbitant rent he was happily 'ripping-off' the predatory club for and lets the waters to a syndicate of a few with the money - often stuffing it full of 'firties' :eek: - result: loss of fisheries to the many! It's been happening for years - the consortia outlined by RDC may well be a way to stop it before there's only a handful of 'super-clubs' in the country with large joining fees giving them the financial muscle to outbid smaller 'local' clubs and the subsequent loss of 'local' waters!:omg:
sam vimes on 23/11/2014 23:07:15
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Clubs banding together might work in some instances, but it's not a panacea. There are waters out there that only remain available while the controlling club remains unaltered in any way, or have certain membership rules (e.g. members must live within a certain distance of the notional centre of the club). I know a few landowners that would gleefully withdraw angling consent, sell/lease to the highest bidder, or demand full current market value, should the encumbent club cease to exist in exactly the form that it's currently in. Not all landowners are all about the money. Some might be but are hamstrung by long term legal covenants made by previous landowners or ancestors. There are more than the odd riverside housebuyer round the country that are more than a little bemused to find that the local club has the fishing rights to the bottom of their garden. There are more than the odd xth generation landowner that rues the day that their great grandad gifted rights, or granted rights at peppercorn rates, in perpetuity. Syndicates aren't universally bad, nor are they always expensive. In some instances landowners accept less income for an expected reduction in footfall. They also appreciate that a syndicate can usually exert more control over who gets to be a member. The fact that they can get a list of names of who is expected to be on their land is also a plus point for them. There are plenty of places that would have no angling access whatsoever were it not for a syndicate.
rubio on 24/11/2014 00:20:31
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There is free fishing all around the country if you are prepared to fail to catch half a dozen specimen fish every time you go.
Alan Tyler on 24/11/2014 08:29:47
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"Very exclusive, yet few members, even back then, were not unaware that our lovely few miles of trout streams could exist in some both geographical and time bubble if all the waters and country around us were being neglected and allowed to go to the wall," Would you check the logic of this, please, Mr. B.? I think/hope it's missing a negative... I hope it means there was general awareness that your group couldn't persist in a bubble if all around were going to wrack and ruin? Sorry to be a revolting pedant, but it goes with the name, and your meaning here is central to your argument. There are bits of free fishing, Rubio, and as a North Londoner I'm aware that I live in a well-blessed area in that regard, but there are also areas without any, and how's a kid to get started if everywhere in bike range is syndicate or big-ticket club?
Paul Boote on 24/11/2014 09:22:58
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I am a bit of a word pedant, too, Alan, but, as I am not being paid to write, proofread and edit my normally spot-on stuff, I am sure you can forgive a rare slip-up from me on a mere Angling forum.
Titus on 24/11/2014 09:30:28
Alan Tyler on 24/11/2014 09:34:18
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Certainly; just checking you mean what I hope you mean. I should probably have PM'd you; apologies if that's the correct form, but I've always tried to avoid the hidden web of behind-the-screen mail.
Paul Boote on 24/11/2014 09:39:05
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I am used to it. At the height of the Balsam / Boote Bashing internet frenzy several years ago, I had some nutter join the old Fly Fishing Forums merely to say that I was using too many commas. A fellow nutter joined in. It was very amusing.
greenie62 on 24/11/2014 09:59:33
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Home Ade, I can't help but feel that simply quoting a URL labelled 'Home' with no further comments is rather at odds with the point of the organisation referenced! ;):rolleyes: It wasn't even clear who your call for the use of plain English was levelled at in the previous 20 posts on the thread - some of whom might take exception to such a loosely-defined criticism - if that is what it was. Apologies if you don't understand the above - after all - English is only my second language (or 3rd if you count Scouse)! Tight Lines!
Mr Cholmondeley-Corker (PaSC) on 24/11/2014 10:09:51
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Well I understood the 'home' reference perfectly and who it was referred to. A good writer knows their audience and writes to be understood. Otherwise what is the point in writing? Unless the point is to write for an audience of one.
Alan Tyler on 24/11/2014 10:16:18
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Edit: (The nutters on the fly forum were) clearly as daft as brushes (and I'd love to know whence that term sprang); you employ precisely the correct number of commas, but nowhere near enough hyphens. ;) One chap was mildly pulled up over his liberal use of exclamation marks; his reply was to the effect that his keyboard was endowed with a liberal supply of them, so why not? Cause of Cheshire-cat grin in Tyler Tower... But to the res; eventually someone is (almost) bound to chuck the "Tragedy of the Commons" into the mix; I had heard of this, and its refutation, on the radio, and was happy to find both rather neatly unfolded here: BBC Radio 4 - Pop-Up Ideas, Series 1, Common Tragedy for those whose ears are better than their reading glasses (Welcome to my world). Skip the first minute, it's just tags and intro. Google reveals that the lady mentioned, who allows us once more to view the glass as half full, is Lynn Ostrom, on whose cheery soul,I wish blessings.
Paul Boote on 24/11/2014 10:51:29
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Those who can write, write. Those who can't write, rant away in the Telegraph's comment columns or email the Today programme on Radio 4 safe in the knowledge that some old curmudgeon will agree with them. People with strong opinions on what is "right", but who couldn't get it right even if they had Thomas Hardy as their writing coach. If you don't like the message, go for the way it was delivered, down to the last squiggle and dot, seems to be their way of "thinking". Pure pointscoring Politics which 90-odd per-cent / per cent / percent of the population are heartily tired of and so despise now.
Peter Jacobs on 24/11/2014 11:14:00
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clearly as daft as brushes (and I'd love to know whence that term sprang) In believe that the original saying was "as soft as a brush" with many brushes in the 18th/19th centuries being made from fox tails. Northern folk use the term soft to mean daft so the saying changed over time to what we know today as as daft as a brush At least that was how it was explained to me many years ago by a fishing friend from Bolton . . . . . .
Paul Boote on 24/11/2014 11:20:42
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"We're not soft! We was well 'ard!" So say the many native (and Northern foreign) fox tails in a large cardboard full of large ziplok bags a few feet from my left elbow. "Didn't stop me putting a .22 bullet into many of your heads, did it, though?" "Yeah. Maybe. But you couldn't catch salmon and sea-trout without us!"
Alan Tyler on 24/11/2014 13:22:53
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Thanks, Peter, it's amazing what one can learn here!


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Hampshire Avon, Christchurch Angling Club

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