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Action Plan for Fish Predation

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Action Plan for Fish Predation

The Angling Trust has published a new action plan for managing fish predation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Source: Angling Trust


Following a wide range of work in the angling community about the impact of predation on fish stocks, including the recent publication of ‘The Big Picture’ by the Predation Action Group, the Government’s reviews of cormorants, goosanders and non-native species such as signal crayfish, the Angling Trust has published a new action plan for managing predation.


The plan details the management arrangements for cormorants and goosanders that the Trust has successfully negotiated with the Government, and the experimental work it is doing with CEFAS to reduce signal crayfish, which are an invasive non-native species. It also addresses a number of issues related to predation by otters and mink.


Mark Lloyd, Chief Executive of the Angling Trust said:

“We recognise that there is a serious problem with unsustainable predation of fish by cormorants, goosanders and otters, as well as invasive non-native species such as mink and signal crayfish, on many still water fisheries and rivers. Predation is natural, but on rivers which are suffering from pollution, low flows, habitat damage and invasive non-native species, it can have a devastating impact on fish stocks.


We must also recognise that wildlife management is a delicate political issue and the Angling Trust has a very serious duty to protect the reputation of angling in the public eye. Any demands the Trust makes of government must be realistic, achievable and not significantly damaging to the reputation of angling.”


A copy of the action plan can be downloaded from the 'Attachment' section in the right hand column of this webpage.







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Comments (4 posted):

the blanker on 10/03/2014 20:35:30
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Seems more like a wish list to me although I agree that the ecology of rivers needs improving from the ground up not start at the top with predators but that horse has already bolted.
The bad one on 11/03/2014 01:02:22
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Agree Blanker but an unrealistic wish list in parts. :omg: We're told Atr is the only show in town! Yet again a show I've no desire to go and see based on the otter section in it. ATr you have capitulated to PAG and it's outlandish emotive rubbish that passes for a "report"! Defra, NE and EA will eat you alive based on that and rightly so in my view!
Peter Jacobs on 11/03/2014 07:44:56
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Agree Blanker but an unrealistic wish list in parts. We're told Atr is the only show in town! Yet again a show I've no desire to go and see based on the otter section in it. ATr you have capitulated to PAG and it's outlandish emotive rubbish that passes for a "report"! Defra, NE and EA will eat you alive based on that and rightly so in my view! I totally agree Phil; the report is at best a weak wish list rather than a proper Action Plan. The section on cormorant predation is very poor considering the amount of volunteer work that has gone into that particular subject. I was hoping for much more to be honest. We (anglers) need to sort out this problem as the prime priority within the Angling Trust.
keora on 11/03/2014 08:18:35
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I've read the report a few times, it's got some good ideas. I think that the Angling Trust has helped angling by getting a slight relaxation in the laws relating to the control of cormorants. The appointment of three cormorant management advisers should eventually lead to clubs making successful applications to control cormorants. As for control of otters, I'm less optimistic. They are a protected species, indigenous to the UK and they've recovered after a collapse in otter numbers in the forties and fifties. Those who propose culling are unrealistic -public opinion would never allow culling to take place. Anglers can protect smaller stillwaters by erecting fencing, but it may be too expensive to do this on bigger stillwaters. But we can't fence off rivers, which is why fishing in some rivers may decline further. We expect too much from the Angling Trust. It has done as much as it can to highlight the problem of predation. It's up to angling clubs to renew their attempts to get licences to control cormorants.


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