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  1. #1
    BLAM Guest

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    I've read about it and seen enough (usually senior anglers as it happens) using this technique but it's something I haven't tried myself. Has anyone got any tips or thoughts? For instance will my 1.5lb test curve Barbel rod suffice or do I need something a bit more "tippy"? Any tackle and tactics views would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay Guest

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    A long powerful rod, say 13 to 14 feet is a good idea.

  3. #3
    BLAM Guest

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    I was looking at a couple of Barbel float rods the other day (Wychwood and Fox I think) both were 13 feet and both reasonably priced. The upper Medway I tend to fish is somewhat narrow though it can be very deep in parts -almost deeper than it is wide on the bends so the extra control offered by a longer rod would probably pay dividends.

    So far as I could tell the guys I have seen are fishing someway over depth. Is there some sort of rule for this? For instance 1 inch overdepth per foot of water or somesuch?

  4. #4
    Chris Pearson Guest

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    Blam,
    Save yourself the extra money,use an 11ft and fish the next peg down.

  5. #5
    Nigel Connor(ACA ,SAA) Guest

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    No hard and fast rule.Its different from laying on in that the idea is that a swim is searched methodically by lifting the rod tip and allowing the bait to move downstream before stopping it again.You dont want to be too much overdepth to impeed the movement of the tackle when you lift the rod tip..I would have a foot would be sufficient.

    Its best suited for close in swims or point swims where the flow goes away from you.A long rod is an asset as you often fishing straight from the rod end to allow the necessary control over the tackle.

  6. #6
    BLAM Guest

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    Chris, that's not a bad idea mate. I've done well dropping in below people fishing in this manner before but it seemed half way toward poaching.

    Nigel, the swims I have in mind are very deep -probably approaching 10-12 feet- which seems odd in a river you can jump across in other parts. However I just don't feel I'm covering the ground as it were by straightforward legering or even trundling or rolling bigger baits (meat etc) through.

    Because these swims by their definition tend to be somewhat slower pace-wise I think this technique might suit my needs admirably.

    I presume the bulk of the shot is hard on the bottom but this then seems to be almost float legering if I'm not mistaken? Perhaps someone knows where the original name stret pegging came from?

  7. #7
    Fred Bonney Guest

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    In the depths your talking about,a long rod is a must,at least 14 foot.
    I would say that weight should be enough to hold bottom and be at least 8 to 12 inches from the hook and fish over depth by at least 2 foot, more in faster swims.
    The line should be let out to form a subsurface bow after the weight hits bottom,the float should then lay flat on the surface and be in a direct inside line with your rod,then you tighten up. If the float is dragged under,let out a little more line,the idea is that the float lies flat.
    Hope all that makes some sense Brad,it is a bit late for me.
    I have no idea where the original name comes from.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    On the road to rack & ruin !!!
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    2,875

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    i`ve seen john wilson doing it for carp on a river but that was out of the main flow in slower water near some lillies i think.
    i suppose it would work for barbel as well and i`m sure he was using the threaded tip section of his avon quiver rod,which are 11 ft i believe.

  9. #9
    Fred Bonney Guest

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    I think it only works out of the main flow.The control is better,either under your rod tip, or down the inside.

  10. #10

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    Its an excellent method to fish for barbel especially if you are fishing a smaller bait like Tares on the hook and feeding loose hemp upstream.

    I find the best way is to cast downstream 45 degrees across the flow, weed allowing, and work the bait across the swim right to the inside line. As a norm I would tend to use 9 - 18inches tail from the bulk shot.
    Normally you want enough shot to sink the float on the bulk plus one extra under the float. The best float is an old 12" heavy peacock quill (if you can find a peacock)
    The holding back will allow the float to angle from the rod tip.

    Its a great method for fishing alongside streamer where the movement of the water keeps the bait wafting around.

    Fantastic, almost forgotten weay to catch barbel and good roach/dace.


    Graham


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