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  1. #1
    Paul Bishop Guest

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    Does anyone have any tips for casting in a tight swim. My local free water gets quite busy and sometimes thereís only a few places left. Most of the pegs have a several feet clear behind but with trees hanging overhead it makes casting awkward. Am I right in thinking that itís just a matter of caster sideways?

    Also some of the swims are even worse and are nothing more than a gap in the trees with no room to cast behind or to the side. BTW Iím float fishing using a waggler.

  2. #2
    BUDGIE BURGESS Guest

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    Cor youve hit lucky on this one Paul!Due to work commitments the only personnal fishing I have been doing recently is attending my local clubs evenning matches.These have been held on a wonderfull pond which is fully surrounded by trees.Some of the swims have been that tight that I have moaned the entire match!!Maybe these tips will help you- When the swim is narrow hold the rod upright and also control your line by holding the hook/hook link in your other hand when you cast.This stops you catching the trees either side when you swing the tackle behind you as you would normally do.Does that make sense? a bit hard to explain but easy to do! When you have over hanging trees in your swim use a sliding float set up regardless of the waters depth you will find this much less likely to get caught up.Also it will tangle less if you have to cast under arm.Above all take your time with every thing you do with your rod.Dont let tight swims put you off,I managed a second place the other week out of a swim narrower than my seat box and tray set up.Despite my moaning!!

  3. #3
    Paul Bishop Guest

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    Thanks Budgie, I'll try that out

  4. #4
    Jason Lennon Guest

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    Just be sure that if you do get your line caught in a tree - try your best to remove it, as otherwise birds or bats may become entangled in it. That gives the antis ammo against us!

  5. #5
    Mark Birchall Guest

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    Paul

    It may be an idea to purchase a take-apart whip/pole thus reducing the agro you will have casting in difficult swims.

  6. #6
    BUDGIE BURGESS Guest

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    Only if you are fishing shallow Mark. Very difficult to land a fish with more line than pole!

  7. #7
    Paul Bishop Guest

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    The small lake/ponds I currently fish are not very deep, they're between 4 & 7 foot deep. I quite fancy getting a pole at some point but as I've only been fishing a few months I thought I'd wait a while.

    What's the difference between a whip and a short margin pole?


  8. #8
    BUDGIE BURGESS Guest

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    Whips tend too be a lot lighter than Margin poles which are meant for Carp.Origonaly whips were always fished too hand ie with the same length of line as the pole.The line was inevitabley atached directly to the tip. These days many whips are elasticated as a precaution against hooking larger fish (most whips will take up to a size 6 elastic)The margin pole is always elasticated and fished with a variety of line lengths.They take real heavy elastics(16-20+)They resemble landing net handles and can land massive carp very quickly.Onlr any use if you are fishing a commercial venue realy.A general purpose whip is arond 5-7m long the shorter 2-3m are specifically used for Bleak bashing.Hope this helps.

  9. #9
    Chris Bishop Guest

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    I fish a few places like this - you can cast a fair way under-hand by literally just swinging the gear out.

    If it's shallow enough and SAFE - ie hard bottomed, no sudden drop-offs, see where you're putting your feet etc - get some waders and get out a yard or two and stand in the water.


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