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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    OK, so just why is it that in the UK a period of hot weather causes Carp (and other species) so many problems, yet on the continent where it is generally a lot hotter for a lot longer the fish don't appear to be affected on anything like the same scale...........

    Is it down to stocking densities, the geology of the waters concerned, the strain of carp stocked, or are they just simply used to it??


  2. #2

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    Excellent thread JC, but winding it back a step for a moment, why is it happening in the first place? I blanked on Thursday night when I all looked spot on in every aspect. If it weren't for my newly found confidence in my rigs than I would have been scratching and pulling all of my hair out.

    I was speaking Rik about this and was discussing the oxygen levels of daytime fishing against night time. In the day the oxygen levels are far from great in this heat and thru the night even worse based on water plants taking up additional gulps. It would be interesting to hear from a plant expert who can deliver an easy explanation to this?

  3. #3

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    On my river a few tree's have gone on a mad one and fallen over due to excessive water up take! According to a green fingered friend they up take so much water, that they become top heavy and fall. And to top it off, one is in my swim!

  4. #4
    Rodney Wrestt Guest

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    I'd imagine it's like us, we are used to our climate and when we go abroad or get a heatwave you see the girls in their lovely crop tops and shor ski..... sorry getting carried away there ) heat takes it's toll on all animals when they're not used to it, but the photosynthesis process Stu described doen't help either as disolved oxygen is already low with the warm weather and especially if there's no wind to at least get some waves pushing the air through.

  5. #5
    Wolfman Woody Guest

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    I'm not going to offer any explanations save that plants give off oxygen through the day and at night take oxygen in. On balance they give far more off otherwise we'd all be up s*** creek.

    Yesterday, I fished a floater on top and one fish passed within 2" of it and didn't even give it a sniff. It's not as if he detected the hook or line, nothing spooked him. Yet the pond fish are feeding like crazy.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    so does this mean continental carp are somehow genetically able to cope better with low D.O levels, because surely the same scenario occurs in waters there? Are continental strains stocked (legally or otherwise....) into UK waters less prone to the effect of hot weather?

    Just last night I read an article in which the author stated continental Carp grow larger because their favoured feeding conditions (IE high water temps) prevail for longer there that here, so based on that you'd expect carp all over the UK to be stuffing themselves silly, instead of just cruising round aimlessly? I know one article is no basis for any strong conclusions, but it does present an interesting point...........

  7. #7
    Frothey Guest

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    hasn't there been a lot of fatalities this year in some of the commercials over there - worse than normal?

    the thing with the water temp,jc, just means they feed longer, not necessarily harder.

  8. #8

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    Could a lily white English labourer dig roads in the Caribbean?

  9. #9
    Les Clark Guest

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    I think to a point that we have this problem every summer but this year with very little rain and no wind it is magnifyed.
    Plus add the amount of weed this year taking more oxgen than normal and the amount of insect life that can sustain ,is it no wonder that the carp are playing hard to get : hamburger or steak ?
    Natural or man made ?

  10. #10
    jason fisher Guest

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    its probably more due to acclimatisation, look at australians, temperature drops to 20C they all get their caots out, we're still sunbathing, put your average english bloke in the middle of the out back he'd collapse after half a days cricket from heat stroke, the ausies still play cricket.

    continental carp are acclimatised to the higher temperatures so will continue to feed, british carp just get the sun lounger out or try to find some where nice and cool to hide because like the pom in the out back they too feel too hot and lethargic.

    that's my theory on it anyway.

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