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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Default Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    I've bought some spools of Drennan Supplex fluorocarbon line - it's sold in 50 metre spools so obviously it's designed for use as a hook length.

    I tried the line out on a local commercial fishery holding plenty of carp. I surface fished with floating crust and a brand of floating pellet, can't remember the name.

    Although fluorocarbon line is supposed to be less visible underwater, it didn't seem to be less conspicuous to the carp. I could often see them approach to within a few inches of the bait, then swim away without taking the bait.

    I tried various combinations. The reel line was Drennan Supplex copolymer, 10lb breaking strain, diameter 0.26 mm, to this I added 10lb Drennan fluorocarbon (0.30 mm dia and very stiff), then 8lb Drennan fluorocarbon (0.25 mm). Later in the day I ended up just fishing with the reel line straight through to the hook, as the fluorocarbon hook lengths didn't seem to be any better than the copolymer reel line.

    I ended up with two small carp and lost a few in the dense reedbeds.

    What do members think of fluorocarbon hook lengths for surface fishing?

    I wonder if fluorocarbon is more effective when legering and float fishing.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    North Yorkshire.
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    10,980

    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    Fluoro for surface fishing isn't necessarily the best idea. Fluoro has a greater density than water, so has a natural tendency to sink. Fluoro will float on the surface tension, but it'll try to sink through it. It may be this that's making the line more visible. There's also an interesting theory about the way fluoro refracts light. I've seen it doing a fair impression of a "light pipe" in bright sunlight. That could be a problem if replicated when fishing.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    The ex editor of this site Graham Marsden used to recommend gently rubbing fluro with emery paper to remove the sheen for floater fishing as he was of the opinion it was the glare that put fish off.

    For my own part I am not really a big fan of fluro. I use it for things like drop shotting and some lure fishing where there are not too many Pike but I think its suggested invisible properties are overrated and I think it’s a bit of a gimmick.

    My opinion is maybe a little biased as I used it in its early days and it was terrible. Far too brittle and breakages used to occur for no apparent reason, even in the middle of what appeared to be a perfectly good bit of line. I hear some of the new brands are allot better but my confidence has been dented by the aforementioned experiences.

    I accept that perhaps in certain light conditions at certain depths it may be slightly less visible than mono but then at others its more visible. Basically I don’t see allot of advantages over mono but I do see disadvantages. That’s why I don’t use it as hooklink for bait fishing and as a leader behind the lead although as Sam Vimes suggests it does sink readily, again I think its not all its made out to be.

    One other point I would make…you mention about fish shying away from the bait as they approach it. I obviously don’t know for sure in your case but one thing I am 100% certain of, its not always the line that they see..its also the hook. I can think of several occasions when hiding the hook in the bait has turned fish shying away at the last second into confident takes without making any change to the hooklink.
    Last edited by Philip; 24-06-2017 at 06:40.

  4. #4
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    Leeds
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    643

    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    Thanks to both of you for your advice.

    I first tried fluorocarbon line about 15 years ago. It was Berkley Vanish, marketed as a reel line (100 yd spools) and it was dreadful. The first and only time I used it I lost two good carp within a couple of hours of starting. I checked the breaking strain when I got home, it was supposed to be 8lb but it broke at 6.5lbs.

    I imagine modern fluorocarbons are better. I know a very experienced angler who uses fluoro hook lengths most of the time

    I think you're right about carp spotting the hook. I saw some of the carp get so near that the nose was touching the bait, so I imagine they were able to see and avoid the hook.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Kent
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    5,005

    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    My experience is limited but have done quite a lot of surface fishing, just about the only carp fishing I enjoy.

    I fished the same swim within a few days, on one day the carp gulp down anything presented to them, using exactly the same rig days later they don't want to know. I've fished some waters where carp just don't take from the surface full stop. I feel this is more of a factor than what sort of line you choose.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    We used to joke that Berkley Vanish was so named because you hook a fish - and it vanishes but that was before we realised that our knots had to change. You can't use a grinner knot on flurocarbon; a tucked bloodknot is fine though. Also flurocarbon sinks like a brick so why would anyone want to use it for surface fishing? The final damning evidence comes from Dr Paul Garner. In his Underwater Angling book he records the tests made comparing various reel lines - and fc did not really score highly. That said, I use it quite regularly but never for surface fishing.
    Make sure that you only use a coated hook when surface fishing - the metallic taste of an uncoated hook is pretty obvious to a stillwater fish and this is probably far more important than a black curling object which trout regularly mistake for a nymph.
    So many cormorants.... so few recipes.

  7. #7
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    Leeds
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    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    I've been using a grinner knot when fishing with the Drennan fluorocarbon hook link line and haven't had any problems with the line breaking at below the expected breaking strain. However I'll try the tucked half blood knot you recommend.

    When dry fly fishing I degrease the last 3ft of the leader so it sinks and supposedly makes it less visible to trout. I'd imagined that using fluorocarbon would be useful when carp fishing on the surface for the same reason.

    I've been rereading Paul Garner's Underwater Angling and for surface fishing he recommends a low diameter hooklength - I assume he means copolymer rather than fluorocarbon.

    I'll get some black coated hooks as you mentioned.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    Also Palomar will work with basically every material. If I am ever in doubt I go to that.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    I seem to remember a very good article by Dave Chilton in the FM archives about the right knot for the various materials we use. I'll see if I can find it.

    Here y'go

    https://www.fishingmagic.com/ultimate-knots/
    Last edited by geoffmaynard; 27-06-2017 at 20:34.
    So many cormorants.... so few recipes.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Default Re: Fluorocarbon line when surface fishing

    Quote Originally Posted by geoffmaynard View Post
    You can't use a grinner knot on flurocarbon
    Its what I have always used on it and never had any problems with it breaking at the knot (or anywhere else) its possible that because I have never used it in lighter BS that after the knot is tied the line was still strong enough for what I was doing but it may have been the attention I gave to tying the knot, most knots weaken line somewhat.

    ---------- Post added at 08:33 ---------- Previous post was at 08:30 ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by keora View Post
    Although fluorocarbon line is supposed to be less visible underwater, it didn't seem to be less conspicuous to the carp. I could often see them approach to within a few inches of the bait, then swim away without taking the bait
    That could have nothing at all to do with your hook length but more to do with how your hook bait was sitting in relation to any freebies you had introduced, fish can be very shy of anything that looks different to them from freebies that have no hook in them. You don't say what the hook/ bait end of your rig was.
    •The crow may be caged, but its thoughts are in the cornfield

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