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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    maidstone kent England
    Posts
    45

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    dont wear to many socks as ya feet will sweat and that will give ya cold feet, and dont wear too many layers in ya sleeping bag as its best to put more layers on when you get up in the morning.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Barnes, London, sw13
    Posts
    81

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    I've solved one problem. bought a pair of skee tex field boots. OMG! they are brill!!!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Cardiff.
    Posts
    91

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    Hi gill Heres 2 more take a hot water bottle and between your bedchair and bag place one of them camping mats. Both are light and take up little room.
    Good luck.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Landau - Rhineland Palatinate
    Posts
    189

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    I used thermal mats under the sleeping bag, they do a great job, too. I now have a sleeping bag from the armenian Army, in which they sleep on the snow (i don´t)


    Place your tackle bag, etc. under the bedchair, they will keep the radiating cold away, too.

    Then, what i have found, works well for me is: I use a big plastic bag in which i slip into with the boots on (or slippers), so i can get to the rods without having to bother about putting on the shoes first. Let it be wide and lose though, otherwise you will be likely to tangle up in it, when you are heading for the rods in the middle of the night.

    And i use the plastic bag, because that can get dirty and a bit damp, the sleeping bag shouldn´t

    Hmmmh, that´s all i can think about now, the other things have been posted already.

    Try your gear in the garden (shelter, bedchair and all), though, it may be too late, when you are at the lake. By doing this you can still get inside in the middle of the night, when you get cold.

  5. #15

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    I have struggled threw this Winter with Cold feet.

    I have some of the Boots mentioned in this thread, actually I complained and one of the Companies replaced my Boots but still struggling.

    Only option now left is to look towards some real mountain hiking socks next winter, reckon hopefully the worst of this winter is over.

    However I would like to ask you guys about the things you put between the bedchiar and your bag, would this be neccassary with all bedchairs, I have a Nash Indulgence however I never went out with it as yet.?

    This whole winter I slept on my Chair LOL, inside the brolly.

    Then great tip regarding the bags for when running to the rods, will remember that one once I start sleeping on the bedchair.

    Found that a Cup of Tea makes me feel a whole lot warmer on the bank, never leave home without it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Landau - Rhineland Palatinate
    Posts
    189

    Default

    Are you sure your boots are a half size larger than your regular boots ?
    They have to be, because of the space needed for the thicker socks.

    It´s not that i am very easily cooled out, but it is essential that you use some of that advice, or at least take precautions (you can leave that stuff in the car for when you need it)

    The bedchair will probably get damp at some point (just your breath at night will see to that) and even the best sleeping bag will get a little damp, too. Just believe us, you will find out what we mean soon enough.

    I have an Armenian Army Sleeping bag made for sleeping in the sonw (waterproof, made for temperatures of -20°C and less) but i wouldn´t take chances and always bring my thermal mat with me. Fold it up into the bedchair before you go, so there is no extra space you are taking u for that)

    EDIT:

    See, that the socks are not too tight, either, otherwise they will prevent the blood flowing through your veins :!:
    Last edited by Tilman Bieselt; 03-02-2010 at 21:30.

  7. #17

    Default

    Tilman Bieselt thank you for the good advice here.

    The Thermal mats you are referring too, do you maybe have a link where I can take a look at it.

    Regarding the Boots they are half a size bigger, have to give attention to this aspect of my night fishing as there is no way that I can take another winter like this with such cold feet, literally some mornings 1/2 ' clock my feet were frozen, and I had to keep moving them to make sure I do not maybe loose toe's or something like that.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Landau - Rhineland Palatinate
    Posts
    189

    Default

    Just call me Tilman, that´s my first name.

    Isomattte zweilagig 1.0, farblich sortiert, PE,: Amazon.de: Sport & Freizeit

    One of these will suffice.

    The self-inflatable stuff is ok, but they don´t last very long and are much more expensive.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Elyria, Ohio U.S.A.
    Posts
    101

    Default

    Hi Gill, Tip: Your body heat is what warms your sleeping bag, do a few excercise's before you get in bag you will be warmer.

    Cat

  10. #20

    Default

    I've tried all sorts for cold feet - various brands of skiing/hiking socks, neoprene socks, heated insoles. I have a pair of thermal wellies which are great for keeping your feet warm but rubbish for walking in.

    I finally found the answer. A thin pair of silk thermal socks under the thick socks. They look like they would make no difference at all but they really do make a massive difference. I've not had cold feet once this winter.

    I can't remember the brand name but I got them from HM suplies. They were described as silk thermal socks and cost about a tenner. I can highly recommend them.

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