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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Wigan
    Posts
    3,433

    Default Re: inline cage feeder

    Quote Originally Posted by tony1234 View Post
    I will try to tuck a part of the hooklength in the feeder . I wonder if I need to fish with braid in that case? NO - no need to overcomplicate things - KISS Principle applies!

    I also have another question . Since it is getting colder i would like to change my hookbait (corn) to dead maggots and put some small sized living maggots in the inline cage feeder. How many dead maggots should i put on a size 10 hook and doesn't that prevent the self hooking mechanism because not fishing with a hair ?.
    The hair-rig isn't necessarily a self-hooking mechanism.
    You can still use the hair with dead maggies - just supaglue one to it - then supaglue another 3-5 to that one!
    Might be worth trying a small cube of meat on the hair - as a change bait - or a drilled 8mm pellet!
    Tight Lines!

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,201

    Default Re: inline cage feeder

    Quote Originally Posted by robtherake View Post
    That's how I do it, anyroad.
    That's a proper Yorkshire sayin that is!

    A hook that size will puncture your maggots. Avoid bream at all costs, but I would use a looped-hair if putting a big bunch of maggots on.
    You can get 20 maggots on (pinched in the arse) with a thin curved sewing needle by looping back a long open hair, tucked into some rig tubing on the shank.
    Last edited by laguna; 06-10-2016 at 00:58.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    South Yorkshire.
    Posts
    2,331
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: inline cage feeder

    Quote Originally Posted by lutra View Post
    Is that even with an inline (bolt rig) feeder like Tony is asking about?
    With my longer hook links, my longer links are fastened to the main line with three loops to form a boom to help prevent tangles.
    Using a short link a boom would be close to impossible (in my opinion) so tucking the short link in the feeder is a way to prevent the issues that were mentioned in the opening post.
    Putting the baited hook in the feeder could also cause the hook to snag the feeder, leaving the hook exposed should keep the hook from snagging.

    Edit.
    Soz lutra I misread your post.
    I only use a longer hook link with a open end feeder, inline would be no longer than 6 inch. The only inline feeders I use are flat bed, the hook as we know is mostly on the baited feeder. I understand the feeder used by the OP was an open end.
    Last edited by rayner; 06-10-2016 at 10:18.

  4. Default Re: inline cage feeder

    I don't use inline flat feeders because the canal I fish on is about 5 meters deep and sometimes there is a strong current .
    I tried some things: what I find puzzling is that while fishing with a flat inline feeder in shallow water, every bite results in a fish, however using that same hooklength on an inline cage feeder things are different a lot more fish get away. Would it be a good thing to increase the weight from the swimfeeder from 40 to 50 or 60 grams ? I also have another question would it be a good idea to use two fake red maggots on the hair ?

    Greetings from Belgium
    Last edited by tony1234; 06-10-2016 at 18:34.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,252

    Default Re: inline cage feeder

    [QUOTE=rayner;1394299]With my longer hook links, my longer links are fastened to the main line with three loops to form a boom to help prevent tangles.
    Using a short link a boom would be close to impossible (in my opinion) so tucking the short link in the feeder is a way to prevent the issues that were mentioned in the opening post.
    Putting the baited hook in the feeder could also cause the hook to snag the feeder, leaving the hook exposed should keep the hook from snagging.

    /QUOTE]

    You'd think so, but in practice it all but eliminates tangles. My thinking is that the initial impact with the water blasts the end contents clear, taking the baited hook with it. It was something I tried in desperation when chucking into the wind with a paternostered open-ender caused a tangle every other cast and since it fixed the issue it's how I've done it ever since. At least this way you can be pretty sure that your bait is presented effectively. Very, very rarely, the hook finds its way out of the other end of the feeder, but since that's only happened a few times over the years I'm happy to stick with it.
    "I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us...very hard to explain why you're mad, even if you're not mad..."

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,201

    Default Re: inline cage feeder

    I've never suffered from tangles with feeders, and I don't stick my hook in the method mix, but for those that are paranoid, here's an original tip:

    Using PVA string...
    As an option, you can fish straight-through using an in-line feeder - maintaining any distance between the hook and feeder. There's no need for a hook-link, bead or swivel.

    Simply tie a stop knot using some PVA string to the line at the required distance between the hook and feeder. Nick the hook through the PVA shortening the length from say a 4" length to form a 2" loop, thus temporarily making it shorter and less prone to tangles for casting purposes. cast and tighten up once the string has dissolved.

    The string won't impede the action of the bolt.

    If you do use a hook-link (preferred), just tie the PVA string through the eye of the swivel instead, then form a loop to shorten it by half, nicking the hook onto the string.

    You heard it here first!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dronfield Derbyshire
    Posts
    1,740

    Default Re: inline cage feeder

    Do you have to use a cage feeder or can you use a method feeder the guru feeders have a removable line clip fitted to them




  8. Default Re: inline cage feeder

    I need to use a closed inline feeder : deep water and current. I do use flat inle feeders for shallow water. I also like to use an inline cage feeder because i can put a lot of pinkies (mini maggots) in the feeder along with the groundbait.

    This saturday I fished with the system using three living maggots on a hook size 14. hooklength 4 inch , thikness 22 , and a boldrig system (with attention to fish safety) . What i don't understand is that when i get a drop back bite , I don't manage to hook the fish . should i increase the weight of the lead ? Perhaps shorter hooklength ?

    I do agree that the flat inline feeder is very good , but i must find a way to catch fish in deep canals to !

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,201

    Default Re: inline cage feeder

    Quote Originally Posted by tony1234 View Post
    I need to use a closed inline feeder : deep water and current. I do use flat inle feeders for shallow water. I also like to use an inline cage feeder because i can put a lot of pinkies (mini maggots) in the feeder along with the groundbait.

    This saturday I fished with the system using three living maggots on a hook size 14. hooklength 4 inch , thikness 22 , and a boldrig system (with attention to fish safety) . What i don't understand is that when i get a drop back bite , I don't manage to hook the fish . should i increase the weight of the lead ? Perhaps shorter hooklength ?

    I do agree that the flat inline feeder is very good , but i must find a way to catch fish in deep canals to !
    Drop back bites are tricky with an in-line feeder. Have a search for "Pristex SLED's" in-line feeders, the inserts used offer some slight resistance when a fish picks up the bait using slack lines and will counter any drop backs. Only small weights available at the moment but I can confirm the inserts (bought separately) can be used to convert any existing feeders and they work very well.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Suffolk
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: inline cage feeder

    There may be some significant difference in what a canal looks like. Ours are typically narrow and shallow. A canal in Belgium may well carry more water than our biggest rivers hence the desire for a cage feeder that gets bait down a long way.
    Mole hill soil and leam are good I think. Sometimes PV1 as an additive.
    It's a short life, enjoy every fin

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