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  #1  
Old 20-03-2017, 09:08
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Default Perch Bobs

One for Brother Binka perhaps ?

Can somebody explain the logic behind using a float that [to me] looks like a small pike bung for a fish that's notoriously resistance averse ? I get them for fishing a small livebait and maybe a river but not for anything else.

A fabulous looking float but surely not very sensitive.
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Old 20-03-2017, 09:29
thames mudlarker thames mudlarker is offline
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

Quote:
Originally Posted by S-Kippy View Post
One for Brother Binka perhaps ?

Can somebody explain the logic behind using a float that [to me] looks like a small pike bung for a fish that's notoriously resistance averse ? I get them for fishing a small livebait and maybe a river but not for anything else.

A fabulous looking float but surely not very sensitive.
I think it's pretty much as you've just mentioned Skip,

I'd say to be able to take the weight of large lobworms and live baits etc but without having to have such a particularly long and larger float to take the weight,
Also as you rightly say about the use of em in rivers where not only do they have to contend with the weight of the bait but just as importantly so it stays stable through the various currents of what ever swim one happens to be fishing anywhere on the river
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Old 20-03-2017, 09:33
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

I think of them very much as 'worm bobs' Skip, in that they are still one of the best worm floats I know of.

The problem with using a normal float and medium to large sized worms is that the perch will often take the worm quite clumsily and appear to play with it first, having multiple stabs at it before committing and the buoyancy in the upper part of the float is a good indicator of what's happening down below.

With a more sensitive float like a straight peacock waggler it runs the risk of submerging and looking like a positive take before it has actually materialised.

That's my take on it anyway.

The old rule still applies though and you can never have too many variations on a theme...

Click the image to open in full size.

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Old 20-03-2017, 09:34
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

Quote:
Originally Posted by S-Kippy View Post
One for Brother Binka perhaps ?

Can somebody explain the logic behind using a float that [to me] looks like a small pike bung for a fish that's notoriously resistance averse ? I get them for fishing a small livebait and maybe a river but not for anything else.

A fabulous looking float but surely not very sensitive.
Good question, one I've been thinking about for a while. I've been using regular waggler a for lobworm and prawn and a pellet waggler float for livebait. As you say the "resistance" theory concerning perch is alien to a pretty bobber surely?
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Old 20-03-2017, 09:48
thames mudlarker thames mudlarker is offline
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

Quote:
Originally Posted by binka View Post
I think of them very much as 'worm bobs' Skip, in that they are still one of the best worm floats I know of.

The problem with using a normal float and medium to large sized worms is that the perch will often take the worm quite clumsily and appear to play with it first, having multiple stabs at it before committing and the buoyancy in the upper part of the float is a good indicator of what's happening down below.

With a more sensitive float like a straight peacock waggler it runs the risk of submerging and looking like a positive take before it has actually materialised.

That's my take on it anyway.

The old rule still applies though and you can never have too many variations on a theme...

Click the image to open in full size.

Truly awsum collection of floats Steve, reminds me of when I sit there going all through me collection of float boxes and vintage stick floats etc

I think that's a very good way of looking at it Steve as regards to the timing of how the perch take large worm baits, like yer way of thinking
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Old 20-03-2017, 09:48
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

Quote:
Originally Posted by binka View Post
I think of them very much as 'worm bobs' Skip, in that they are still one of the best worm floats I know of.

The problem with using a normal float and medium to large sized worms is that the perch will often take the worm quite clumsily and appear to play with it first, having multiple stabs at it before committing and the buoyancy in the upper part of the float is a good indicator of what's happening down below.

With a more sensitive float like a straight peacock waggler it runs the risk of submerging and looking like a positive take before it has actually materialised.

That's my take on it anyway.

The old rule still applies though and you can never have too many variations on a theme...

Click the image to open in full size.

But is that additional buoyancy not counter productive in that it provides increased resistance ? Or is that offset by the advantage of having a float that resists the "false" bites ? I can see why you might want to wait a bit when fishing a big old "blackbird's fancy" but do you not run the risk of the bait being dropped due to the extra resistance ? Or are perch not quite as resistance averse as we are lead to believe ?

I ask because I've heard of a local lake that's got a few big perch in and I half fancy a go at them.

How do you shot them too ? Bulk and a dropper ?
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Old 20-03-2017, 09:57
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

In addition to what I mentioned earlier there is of course the suitability for suspending large baits but I never associate float fishing for perch with the resistance problems I sometimes think of when fishing a free running lead.

This is typically how I 'hang' my floats off the rod tip when fishing the nearside drop off and when the fish finally commits it's off and running on the 'pin quite happily until I strike.

I do this because I fish a large water an awful lot and even on flat calm days like below the tow can be quite something and it's an easy way of counteracting it without laying lead on the bottom which could drag on a take and put the fish off...

Click the image to open in full size.


I would much rather float leger than have to lay shot on the deck, I think it's more free running.


I think larger baits like worms also mask any resistance in the weight of the float and shot.

---------- Post added at 10:57 ---------- Previous post was at 10:51 ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by S-Kippy View Post
But is that additional buoyancy not counter productive in that it provides increased resistance ? Or is that offset by the advantage of having a float that resists the "false" bites ? I can see why you might want to wait a bit when fishing a big old "blackbird's fancy" but do you not run the risk of the bait being dropped due to the extra resistance ? Or are perch not quite as resistance averse as we are lead to believe ?

I ask because I've heard of a local lake that's got a few big perch in and I half fancy a go at them.

How do you shot them too ? Bulk and a dropper ?
Sorry Skip I was typing my earlier post as you posted but I think I've probably answered in part.

I tend to bulk shot around two thirds of the way down and a single dropper halfway below that, I occasionally get aborted takes but put that down more to the fish just being a bit non-committal on the day.

I think resistance and perch is an issue in general but I don't think that a bobber represents that much when balanced as a shotted rig in the water.
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  #8  
Old 20-03-2017, 09:58
thames mudlarker thames mudlarker is offline
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

Quote:
Originally Posted by binka View Post
In addition to what I mentioned earlier there is of course the suitability for suspending large baits but I never associate float fishing for perch with the resistance problems I sometimes think of when fishing a free running lead.

This is typically how I 'hang' my floats off the rod tip when fishing the nearside drop off and when the fish finally commits it's off and running on the 'pin quite happily until I strike.

I do this because I fish a large water an awful lot and even on flat calm days like below the tow can be quite something and it's an easy way of counteracting it without laying lead on the bottom which could drag on a take and put the fish off...

Click the image to open in full size.


I would much rather float leger than have to lay shot on the deck, I think it's more free running.


I think larger baits like worms also mask any resistance in the weight of the float and shot.
Totally agree on that note Steve, very well said if I may say so
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  #9  
Old 20-03-2017, 10:09
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S-Kippy S-Kippy is offline
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

Quote:
Originally Posted by binka View Post

Sorry Skip I was typing my earlier post as you posted but I think I've probably answered in part.

I tend to bulk shot around two thirds of the way down and a single dropper halfway below that, I occasionally get aborted takes but put that down more to the fish just being a bit non-committal on the day.

I think resistance and perch is an issue in general but I don't think that a bobber represents that much when balanced as a shotted rig in the water.
Presumably "Captain Squab" is fished on the bottom and the float shotted accordingly? I guess if you are too shallow the weight of the squab is going to sink the float unless you've seriously undershotted it.

Might give this a go. I have a few rather nice bobs that have never got wet.
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  #10  
Old 20-03-2017, 10:16
binka binka is offline
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Default Re: Perch Bobs

Quote:
Originally Posted by S-Kippy View Post
Presumably "Captain Squab" is fished on the bottom and the float shotted accordingly? I guess if you are too shallow the weight of the squab is going to sink the float unless you've seriously undershotted it.

Might give this a go. I have a few rather nice bobs that have never got wet.
I fish with 'em layed on the bottom and suspended Skip, one of my favourites is just standing it up three or four inches off bottom just as if you were bloodworm fishing and you will often see the float slightly pulling down when the worm touches the deck and manages to get a grip on something.

It's a quick and easy job to just lighten up on the shot if you're coming up off the deck to fish off bottom.

I've seen bobbers shotted right down to the tip stem in the past which defeats the whole object of them imo, they should have plenty of shoulder above the surface.
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