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  1. #31

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    As long as no one is harming the fish or each other I can’t see any problem with any sort of fishing. When you look back at some of the old photos of big catches, where the fish are piled on top of each other for the photo, caught by good experienced anglers who wouldn’t have wanted to damage the fish at the time, it makes you realize how far we have come in fish welfare. Barbel handling, carp care, rig safety, safer larger landing nets and the requirement for unhooking mats, the and the banning of barbed hooks, all show progress. My club Facebook page often has photos of dangerous rigs, threats of bags for littering and reminders of the need for care handling fish.

    I’m a bit conflicted by commercials, they too gave me a way of catching when I needed a bit of confidence when I got back into fishing, but I’m not particularly happy at the idea of filling up a lake with hungry carp who wouldn’t survive without anglers bait. But it’s where I told a friend to go with his kids to give them a first go at fishing. I took mine fishing for roach and bream on the pole but they’re badgering me to take them to the commercial now and I can understand why.

    I’ve gone from carp fishing on the float when I started back to mainly tenching, then barbel fishing and now fishing for large bream. I enjoy all equally and will do most, of all of them at some point in the season. I’m thinking of doing some fishing for bigger roach later in the year. I don’t think thirty years ago before I stopped fishing there was the amount of information out there about each sort of fishing and the waters where you could catch them that I would have been able to do that. I think that’s got to make the sport more attractive

  2. #32

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    as several have already said on here - the 20-30 year old techniques will still catch plenty of fish. Perhaps unusual on this forum - I fish open matches (on rivers, drains and canals) and still use the same techniques and largely the same tackle as I did 30 years ago. I still win a few brown envelopes and the fish still eat casters! The only significant change for me is halibut pellets for Barbel on the feeder (hair rigged). It's the only time i use a hair rig/ I've never fished a method feeder - and don't feel a compulsion to do so.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    leafy cheshire
    Posts
    10,161

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    Variety is indeed the spice of life. The odd blank is thereapeutic and teaches me the I don't know everything(much) and never will. Fishing with old methods whatever they were, with old Tackle and with care and consideration must remain enjoyable much as driving a vintage car or a convertible on a suñny day.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    3,338
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    A simple thing like Fishing a sensitive waggler (bodied or straight) is a thing of the past now in many areas, where all you can find in a tackle shop are pellet wagglers with or without lots of weight at their base and Pole floats.

    And if you asked to buy a few onion wagglers the salesman will usually look at you in pure ignorance because he’s never heard of them.

    And when you explain to him that an onion is a sensitive waggler with a smallish body with a longish tapering stem (made from a peacock quill, or sometimes made with a sarkandas reed stem with an insert), and it’s partially-loaded usually with copper in its base, and it flies through the air true and straight without the characteristic waggle that gets the waggler it’s name, and you need it to fish tight up against distant features like islands and Lilly beds or tight up to far bank features, because it flies with the hooklengths trailing behind the float as and flies as straight as a dye and can be cast with a lot of accuracy; and a light comes on in his eyes and he shows you some floats with big weighted bottoms that even the swans would scatter when they hit the water like a bomb and even Carp would have trouble sinking it.

    luckily you can still find a few decent light wagglers both partially loaded and unloaded and straight or bodied on the web but alas not in any tackle shop near me.

    Billy Lane and Ivan Marks would be turning in their graves.

    There are lots of other wagglers that all had their own specific uses but because they are not needed on modern overstocked Carp predominant waters they no longer appear in our tackle shops.

    The art of float fishing for anything other than Carp or for using with a Pole is fast becoming a lost art because everyone seems to fish heavily stocked commercials and snake lakes these days, and a lot of the traditional skills are being lost.

    Progress is not always going forwards.

    Keith
    Last edited by Keith M; 09-07-2019 at 19:13.
    Happiness is fish shaped (It used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

  5. #35

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    Probably the biggest single change in angling over the last 20 years is the focus has moved away from hunting to trapping.

    Both are equally skillful and meritable although personally I think trapping requires more skill as you need a better & deeper understanding
    to predict what your quarry will do rather than chasing after it.

    Of course all the old techniques are still available plus a whole raft of new ones and anyone can fish however they want.
    Last edited by Philip; 09-07-2019 at 18:32.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Azide the Stour
    Posts
    3,773

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith M View Post
    A simple thing like Fishing a sensitive waggler (bodied or straight) is a thing of the past now in many areas, where all you can find in a tackle shop are pellet wagglers with or without lots of weight at their base and Pole floats.

    And if you asked to buy a few onion wagglers the salesman will usually look at you in pure ignorance because he’s never heard of them.

    And when you explain to him that an onion is a sensitive waggler with a smallish body with a longish tapering stem (made from a peacock quill, or sometimes made with a sarkandas reed stem with an insert), and it’s partially-loaded usually with copper in its base, and it flies through the air true and straight without the characteristic waggle that gets the waggler it’s name, and you need it to fish tight up against distant features like islands and Lilly beds or tight up to far bank features, because it flies with the hooklengths trailing behind the float as and flies as straight as a dye and can be cast with a lot of accuracy; and a light comes on in his eyes and he shows you some floats with big weighted bottoms that even the swans would scatter when they hit the water like a bomb and even Carp would have trouble sinking it.

    luckily you can still find a few decent light wagglers both partially loaded and unloaded and straight or bodied on the web but alas not in any tackle shop near me.

    Billy Lane and Ivan Marks would be turning in their graves.

    There are lots of other wagglers that all had their own specific uses but because they are not needed on modern overstocked Carp predominant waters they no longer appear in our tackle shops.

    The art of float fishing for anything other than Carp or for using with a Pole is fast becoming a lost art because everyone seems to fish heavily stocked commercials and snake lakes these days, and a lot of the traditional skills are being lost.

    Progress is not always going forwards.

    Keith
    I always thought the onion float was a reversed crowquill (thin end upwards with a small cork body at the base) and a ducker was a crowquill thick end up with a cork body again at the base. My favourite wagglers - according to Ivan Marks they must be dead straight - are made of just peacock quill, usually with an insert, although I've made plenty out of plastic drinking straws that work OK. Stan Piecha brought along some the floats Ivan gave him in the 60s when we had the first Likely Lads reunion and they were some of the best wagglers I've seen, all made by Ivan, yet his rejects!

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    There
    Posts
    4,980

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith M View Post
    A simple thing like Fishing a sensitive waggler (bodied or straight) is a thing of the past now in many areas, where all you can find in a tackle shop are pellet wagglers with or without lots of weight at their base and Pole floats.

    And if you asked to buy a few onion wagglers the salesman will usually look at you in pure ignorance because he’s never heard of them.

    And when you explain to him that an onion is a sensitive waggler with a smallish body with a longish tapering stem (made from a peacock quill, or sometimes made with a sarkandas reed stem with an insert), and it’s partially-loaded usually with copper in its base, and it flies through the air true and straight without the characteristic waggle that gets the waggler it’s name, and you need it to fish tight up against distant features like islands and Lilly beds or tight up to far bank features, because it flies with the hooklengths trailing behind the float as and flies as straight as a dye and can be cast with a lot of accuracy; and a light comes on in his eyes and he shows you some floats with big weighted bottoms that even the swans would scatter when they hit the water like a bomb and even Carp would have trouble sinking it.

    luckily you can still find a few decent light wagglers both partially loaded and unloaded and straight or bodied on the web but alas not in any tackle shop near me.

    Billy Lane and Ivan Marks would be turning in their graves.

    There are lots of other wagglers that all had their own specific uses but because they are not needed on modern overstocked Carp predominant waters they no longer appear in our tackle shops.

    The art of float fishing for anything other than Carp or for using with a Pole is fast becoming a lost art because everyone seems to fish heavily stocked commercials and snake lakes these days, and a lot of the traditional skills are being lost.

    Progress is not always going forwards.

    Keith
    I have a box of floats from Marks to Ashurst to stillwater blues and so on. I dont think I will live long enough to use them all.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
    Posts
    3,093
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    You don't have to go back as far as Marks and Lane etc Keith,look how Drennans range of wagglers(floats in general)have 'progressed',sadly several brilliant patterns have gone,I looked at their website just the other day,hardly a float I would use sadly...
    Dave Harrell does some good floats,though mainly river patterns imo.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Azide the Stour
    Posts
    3,773

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    I miss the Drennan Canal Crystals but did stock up on a few so OK for a few years. I also liked the 5 no. 4 wire-stem Avons as well; now the smallest size is 3BB. When it comes to wagglers it's long been easiest to make far better ones than almost all commercially-made ones though I do like the original Dave Harrell insert wagglers for fishing up in the water. I'm currently trying to make some versions of these using 2mm and 3mm hollow pole float tips.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
    Posts
    3,093
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Returned to fishing? What changes have you noticed?

    I really liked the drennan float sets that had reversed(thin end at the tip) peacock wagglers from 2bb to 3aa+,seven floats on the pack,I bought several packs,but have repaired them as paint has chipped etc,the go to float for me on still,or slow moving rivers,whoever is designing their floats these days doesn't understand float usage and very often must look pretty,which float anglers know,means nothing if it can't do the application you want it for...

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