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Thread: Whips

  1. #11
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Whips

    Personally I use a pole float but the technique of using a waggler mentioned previously looks very interesting

    This video might help for those interested



    I always use a pole float though even if its a little windy the weight is usually enough to cast out

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    Default Re: Whips

    A couple of threads about whip fishing on here have really opened my eyes to a method that I knew very little about. It's my little girls birthday next week and I'm going to get her a 3 metre whip, she says that she only really likes to catch small fish! After reading a few articles and watching videos, I'm convinced she will catch more and enjoy the simplicity of the method.
    Thank you Fishing Magic for making me rethink my tactics......and hopefully eliminate the hours I spend untangling acres of line from around small reels and rod tips!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    leafy cheshire
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    10,688

    Default Re: Whips

    I hope it works out. I bought a whip buy have yet to use it.

  4. #14

    Default Re: Whips

    I have several whips but I don't use any of them now, I used to use them for small fish fishing on the Trent, soar and canal.

    Regards floats I always used tiny stick floats, in Nottingham we had 'black nats' back in the day, the floats I used to use was similar to them but slight different. I won quite a few sections with my whips but I don't match fish anymore and that fishing isn't my idea of fun nowadays so I don't do it. If you have any question I'm more than willing to help
    The world is full of kings and queens who blind your eyes and steal your dreams!

  5. #15

    Default Re: Whips

    as one of the few active (natural water) match fisherman on this forum - I use whips a lot.
    personally I always use a top & bottom float - if it's that windy that I would need a waggler then I would be using a pole or fishing rod & line.
    Depending on the situation I have rigs from 3 dust shot up to 8g floats! A lot of my whip fishing is done with a 4 or 5 m whip and a small wire-stemmed peacock quill float that take between 3 and 6 no.8 shot. This is for fishing steady flowing rivers up to 5 or 6 foot deep.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    leafy cheshire
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    10,688

    Default Re: Whips

    Which whips out of interest?

  7. #17

    Default Re: Whips

    An old whip never dies... it just takes on some odd curves!
    I use three from the 80s and two more from the noughties ... none are available for sale now ... so not much use!
    Old
    Shakespeare 3m
    Shaky super team 7m (this is the one I use most)
    Maverick Thema alborella 4m

    Slightly younger
    Shaky super team 8m
    Daiwa tournament pro 10m
    Those two I mostly use elasticated on the wye and Severn for dace fishing

  8. #18

    Default Re: Whips

    This is probably a really stupid question but I know nothing about whips or poles! What is the difference? I fish the Basingstoke Canal sometimes but there are some interesting looking swims with overhanging trees on my side so I thought maybe of trying a whip (for the roach). Are all whips telescopic because I will need to add sections? Also there are river swims where I would like to lay-on across a reed bed could this be achieved with a whip of about 8 metres. One last question, which whip would you recommend? Thanks.

  9. #19

    Default Re: Whips

    can of worms truly opened ...

    anglers and manufacturers use the terms with a bit of abandon, and there is some cross-over.
    Historically a whip is a simple pole with a flexible solid top (flick tip). The line is attached directly to that tip and the rig is just shorter than the length of the whip. The whip is quite flexible to absorb lunges of bigger fish, but is mostly used for catching small fish fast.
    A pole, on the other hand, is typically used with a rig much shorter than the length one is fishing - and sections are added and removed to put the rig out to the fishing position and bring the fish in when hooked. In ye olden days the line would be attached direct to a flexible top section - in the modern days a section of elastic is used as a shock absorber. Thus the pole can be used to reach great lengths (eg. 16m) even when sitting under overhanging trees. It is also more suitable for large fish - match anglers often land carp upwards of 15 pounds on poles.

    so far so simple .... now the complications.
    1. modern poles are very thin walled and would not cope with the rigours of casting in the style of a whip
    2. generally modern poles are too stiff to use with a flick tip style
    3. some anglers now use heavy gauge elastic within a specialist whip as insurance for bigger fish hooked and also where the average size is quite large (eg. 6oz upwards)
    4. "system" whips have been around since the 80s - they are part telescopic and part take apart - allowing anglers to follow a shoal out whilst still using a flick tip setup.
    5. having said that - on commercial fisheries some big weights have been taken by using just the end couple of sections of a pole with elastic and equal amount of line. This is generally referred to as "top 2" rather than a whip approach.

    I guess that is now as clear as mud :-)

    Generally a pole is more adaptable to a range of circumstances, whereas a whip is a more specialist tool for catching small fish fast . The whip is simpler and more back to our roots as kids with a piece of cane and string.
    Last edited by silvers; 22-08-2019 at 09:15. Reason: added more info

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    leafy cheshire
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    10,688

    Default Re: Whips

    Very clear actually. I still don't want one though.

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