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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    58

    Default Choosing an inline cage

    Hi,
    I haven't been feeder fishing for too long, but I'm quite interested in trying an inline feeder as an alternative to a method. I love the simplicity of free running inline method rigs, and I like the speed of bait release, but perhaps an inline cage is more versatile.

    Models I've found are as follows:
    - Matrix inline cage feeder
    - Preston ICS inline wire feeder
    - Preston ICS inline pastic feeder
    - Sensas plastic cage feeder

    I use ground bait mainly, and have recently tried soaked baby corn pellets. I'd like to be able to pack some unmixed big particles such as corn simply.

    How should I choose between plastic and wire?

    So basically I need:
    - a feeder that I can rig inline freerunning or with a stop on the mainline
    - between 30 and 90 gr.
    - get the feeder to the bottom with not too much bait loss
    - quick bait release

    Would you advise me please?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
    Posts
    3,537
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    Cage feeders will lose bait on the fall,that's what they're designed for,also groundbait release depends on how you mix it and the make up of the groundbait,a dampish fluffy mix works best,I don't normally want my bait coming off the feeder until it's hit the deck,so tend to use tube type feeders,mainly taped to stop feed coming out of the holes.
    Last edited by whitty; 26-07-2019 at 14:12.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    metroland.....
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    7,390

    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    A 90gr feeder is very heavy? Are you using carp rods?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    Quote Originally Posted by whitty View Post
    Cage feeders will lose bait on the fall,that's what they're designed for,also groundbait release depends on how you mix it and the make up of the groundbait,a dampish fluffy mix works bes,I don't normally want my bait coming off the feeder until it's hit the deck,so tend to use tube type feeders,many taped to stop feed coming out of the holes.
    Ok thanks Whitty. So do you mean something like an inline pellet feeder?
    The other day while I was at decathlon I saw this one:
    Choosing an inline cage-pellfeedm.jpg

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    Quote Originally Posted by peter crabtree View Post
    A 90gr feeder is very heavy? Are you using carp rods?
    Yes it's very heavy and for me even difficult to cast. But at the moment I fish large deep canals and the current moves anything lighter.
    With the lighter models (20, 30 gr I suppose) I will fish my small streams back home and the Oxford canal (which is up to 4 feet deep I believe!).
    The rod I use is a Cormoran GF Feeder PRO Short Track, 3,00m/9,84ft 50-170g. It handles 120 gr methods without any problem. My back remains the most delicate part of the cast

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    North West
    Posts
    2,193

    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    Plastic cage feeders will lose less ground bait on the descent than wire ones as the plastic cage has thicker webbing. I’ve switched from Guru to the Preston ICS system and really like them. I have banjo and pellet feeders and bomb cubes. I daresay, if I felt so inclined, I could add a couple of cage feeders but don’t use them on the lakes I fish. They’d be good for bream on slow rivers but I got none of that available.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
    Posts
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    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    I wouldn't use inline for casting distance wise for the tangle aspects,I'd rather use an elasticated pellet feeder if using that style,because you can tuck the hookbait into the feed easily,but what I really meant was a normal open end feeder,rigged helicopter rig style,look it up online,to be honest,there are many rigs and baits and using a running inline feeder would be my last choice.
    Last edited by whitty; 26-07-2019 at 17:01.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    Thank you guys.

    I'll look at both options, plastic cage and helicopter rigs.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    North West
    Posts
    2,193

    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    Quote Originally Posted by whitty View Post
    I wouldn't use inline for castingdistance for the tangle aspects,I'd rather use an elasticated pellet feeder if using that style,because you can tuck the hookbait into the feed easily,but what I really meant was a normal open end feeder,rigged helicopter rig style,look it up online,to be honest,there are many rigs and baits and using a running inline feeder would be my last choice.
    How about river anglers taking a leaf out of the stillwater anglers’ book and tucking the hookbait into the feeder? I know it’s a longer hooklength but with the hook tucked out of the way, tangles should be minimal and the hookbait will wash out along with the feed. For distance casting a turn of PVA string around the hooklength/mainline might be useful?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
    Posts
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    Default Re: Choosing an inline cage

    I use the tucking method on the river with the pellet feeder,short hooklinks,caught lots of bream,on pellet,or wafters.

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