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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    leafy cheshire
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    12,121

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    No comment!

    Ps. I haven't the time to do justice to my rods and reels without Poles.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
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    3,826
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    There are three things that tbe pole are brilliant at,one is feeding(with a pot),putting the float in position,especially under trees is second,but the main one is presentation. However fishing in a tow with a pole with baits like maggot and caster is something ive found does not pay to be stationary and have caught on the waggler 8yds along over loose feed,even on pellet,something that is virtually impossible to present correctly on the pole unless you start with 2m of pole behind you and feed it out as the tow takes the float,so as to keep online....

    As for insomnia,im waking between 3&3.30am every morning,its now becomi g a mental thing i think,i think a bottle of Jerry's JD might cure it...
    Last edited by whitty; 06-12-2019 at 10:53.

  3. #13

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Each to their own, of course. But if we just stop at that, we'll have nothing to write about, so I'll add a bit more.

    I don't see the need to make it an "either/or" matter. Fishing methods are complementary, not exclusive.
    Knives and forks each have their uses.

    Somebody said pole's an "ugly" method, and a few others imply something similar. Ok, but just as I appreciate how "pretty" running line is, there's nothing ugly about a float dotted til it's just held up in the film, sometimes in places you could never put or keep a float, and bites that can be hit in the blink of an eye on a short line.

    Rod and line is certainly versatile. But it's less, not more versatile than than the option to select either or both.

    It's absolutely true that you can't fish a pole beyond a shortish length from a chair. But I can't fish any method properly from a chair - except waiting a long time for a bite, which I'm always loath to do.


    I wonder if some anglers fight shy of poles because they haven't really tried? I'd been fishing for a fair while before I found a mate one day fishing the canal basin in Chester with this revolutionary bit of kit, the first (or one of) 10m carbon pole. Made by Fothergill and Harvey, later TriCast, by the way. I watched him for a bit while he caught some bream with a still bait in a swim that always towed due to locks. Then he said "You have a go". I did. It felt like I'd never fished before, and I shaped up like an idiot. Shipping out, I bounced the rig into a tangle. Shipping out a second time, I realised I'd no idea how to hold the thing. Having got a grip on it, the float went down, and I was still solving the puzzle of how to move the tip, 10m away, 2 feet, when it came back up. Next time, I hit the bite and float plus fish came out of the water. And so on. Yes, it can be like that when you first have a go. A while later on you will be waving the thing around as easily as your float rod. But it needs practice like anything else. Using a reel, for instance.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    on the move
    Posts
    2,069

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    I have various poles and whips from 16m down to margin poles all left over from my match fishing days when you had to have them to compete equally.
    Now they rarely see the light of days unless I have a use for them where I don't have to drag around a seat box and all the bits and pieces. I have used them successfully on small streams and lakes where I have dropped baits into small gaps in weed beds.
    Most tackle as a place in angling and to rule one out could mean the difference between a blank and a good day.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
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    3,826
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Yes Steve,my big issue now is that though i dont like blanking,i accept it more readily,i find more enjoyment working out how to make set up work,put that alongside the fact that catching a few 2oz roach is tantamount to blanking to me...

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    metroland.....
    Posts
    7,472

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    It's obvious that poles are like Marmite, you either like them or not. To really get the most out of one, as with most aspects of fishing, practice makes perfect.
    One of the vital things to get right is the height of your seatbox, too high or low can make it a chore. Positioning rollers is another factor which comes with experience, a good pole angler rarely looks behind himself whilst shipping back, eyes should be firmly on the business end and what the fish is doing.
    Then of course there's the pole itself. Only the really dedicated pole users would dream of spending £2000+ on one, but the difference when you get to use a top range pole is very noticeable.
    The average margin pole @ 9meters weighs on average 850g+. A top range pole @ 16meters weighs the same.
    Obviously a totally different tool.
    For me the greatest advantages of using one is the presentation aspect. That far bank slack on a river, which with rod and line is impossible to cast to.Then, even if managed, it will only be moments before the current catches the slack line and pulls it away.
    Likewise holding a float back in the flow of a river so it remains stationary can produce bites a moving float may not achieve .
    Even on some lakes there is a tow which will affect a float and running line, a pole again has the advantage of holding position.


    The downside is the cost of the pole and its vital accesories such as rollers, breakages are more common on expensive poles too due to their lightness. A new section can be hundreds of pounds...

    To pole or not to pole ?

    For me yes, mainly due to the examples above and the desire to compete in competition fishing .

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
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    3,826
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    1

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    As soon as i saw you had posted Simon i thought you personally have to use them,just to be able to compete,its a must in match fishing,there again so is carryingfour float rods,four feeder rods,four whips,exaggeration i know but you know where im coming fro.

  8. #18

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Reading between the lines, some seem to see pole as a complication and a weighty chore compared to rod and line.
    I think it's often the other way around. If you are fishing say 6, 7, 8m from the bank, there's nothing lighter, simpler or more streamlined than a pole. Who needs the weight of a reel with it's mousetrap bail-arm and enough line to fish at the far end of a football pitch? Also, I never use rollers unless longer than 9/10m - soft ground or a holdall etc does the job, so no clutter needed.

    That said, at longer lengths, poles can make you sit in a fixed, set position, and if you're prone to physical aches and pains, being able to move around a bit on your box is appreciated, and you can do this with more easily with rod and line.

    I agree poles can pull off special tricks, like fishing in awkward spots, near to snags, over the flow etc etc - but the presentation can be made so good that the pole will often do bread-and-butter open-water stuff more effectively than rod and line.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
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    3,826
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Kev,they do virtua!ly everything they can reach,but holding one at say eight metres or more combined with waiti g more than ten minutes for a bite is a chore,especially if its cold,a fantastic angling tool which to get a good one is expensive,which wears quickly on the sections that are broken down on,plus i dont need one...

  10. #20

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Quote Originally Posted by whitty View Post
    Kev,they do virtua!ly everything they can reach,but holding one at say eight metres or more combined with waiti g more than ten minutes for a bite is a chore,especially if its cold,a fantastic angling tool which to get a good one is expensive,which wears quickly on the sections that are broken down on,plus i dont need one...
    I don't usually wait that long I'm not trying to persuade you personally, Alan - just saying, as they say.
    BTW, as to wearing out. I am still using the top end Shimano I bought in 1993! I've got through some bottles of Jointsave, and I can't quite believe it myself, but there it is. Best £650 I ever spend in fishing.
    I've got two full spares lined up - but they're just gathering cobwebs. I can't imagine the total number/weight of fish that have been caught on it.

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