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  1. #21

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    like anything - one can be too obsessive about a method and use it when other options could work better.
    Equally - in the end we go fishing to enjoy ourselves, so why not do things that we enjoy?
    As a match angler I carry (barrow) a large range of options, but I always have a preference for running line float first, pole second and lead/feeder last. I know that I've cost myself winnings by that preference in the past and will do so again in the future. Having said that - even winning fishomania or riverfest wouldn't change my life - so why compromise? does that make me a hedonist?

    Poles are definitely not clumsy, but they do require some practise. Watch videos of good long pole anglers and you'll see smooth, unhurried actions and dexterity.
    The number one advantage of poles is to place hookbait in the same place as feed - with much less effect from wind and flow/tow.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    I enjoy reading your post Kev, my experiences sort of mimic your own.
    Like most, the fist pole I had incorporated a crook. A strange looking gadget that held around ten inches elastic, at the time the elastic was I'm sure a no7. A craze that went around angling circles like wild fire was internal elastics,
    It involved ptfe tape around the end of the top kit with elastic fastened top and bottom with beads. Crude but did the job. We have to admit from the early days pole fishing has evolved immeasurably.
    Pole fishing can never totally be ignored, it has it's place in the anglers bag. The benefits have been mentioned by everyone else.

  3. #23

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Quote Originally Posted by rayner View Post
    I enjoy reading your post Kev, my experiences sort of mimic your own.
    Like most, the fist pole I had incorporated a crook. A strange looking gadget that held around ten inches elastic, at the time the elastic was I'm sure a no7. A craze that went around angling circles like wild fire was internal elastics,
    It involved ptfe tape around the end of the top kit with elastic fastened top and bottom with beads. Crude but did the job. We have to admit from the early days pole fishing has evolved immeasurably.
    Pole fishing can never totally be ignored, it has it's place in the anglers bag. The benefits have been mentioned by everyone else.
    I remember all that! My first effort, on the Shakey tele, involved whipping quiver tip eyes onto the tip and fitting elastic between tip and bottom eye. It worked, kind of. Because you couldn't break it down, you had to close down the bottom two sections to net your fish/re-bait. Because I could only conceive of holding it like a rod (the standard pole holds were in the future) I made a 4oz weight wrapped in foam to push up the butt so it balanced, again, kind of. But it worked, and I got a taste for experimenting with things longer than the rod......

    I'd forgotten about the crook! They were soon left by the wayside. Before the PTFE bush came along, I tried making a bush by gluing the liner of a rod ring into a short sleeve of scrap fibreglass which pushed onto the tip. It was rubbish - the elastic wore out in no time. Then there was the liner made from a piece of biro inner tube, flared out a bit and flashed with your lighter to shape the end.

    Necessity is the mother of invention, or at least it was then.

  4. #24
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    It's true, at the time there were lots of variations of doing the internal thing. The elastic between two beads was just the way I did it. The technique sounds a lot more tidy than it actually was, it incorporated a swivel two loop de loops and a shoe knot.
    Or at least more complicated. It needed a wire to get it in place and a string to take it out.
    It was good fun, not at the time though, it was mega serious.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    I made my first pole aged about 12 or 13 from a length of bamboo and a 2 foot fibre glass tip one could buy from rod building supplies. It was about 14foot when rods were about 11 foot. I made it specifically to reach over reeds in an awkward place to catch chub on the R.Roding in Essex. It worked a treat dropping slugs on their tails and watching them spin round to grab them.
    Happy days.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Quote Originally Posted by silvers View Post

    Poles are definitely not clumsy, but they do require some practise. Watch videos of good long pole anglers and you'll see smooth, unhurried actions and dexterity.
    The number one advantage of poles is to place hookbait in the same place as feed - with much less effect from wind and flow/tow.
    No,poles are not clumsy and all fishing is best done in a smooth practiced manner,but holding a pole in a stiff breeze when its cold,trying to get bites is bloody awful,and dont tell me you haven't done it,in winter leagues etc. Also i revert to my earlier post that unless your balling bait in,loose feed travels in a tow,at times some distance,several metres,thus making it difficult on the pole,because it is more suited to being held in place,so much so you tend not to realise how much its towing and wonder why bites are so slow to come...




    As for not waiting that long Kev,i take it you dont fish the pole in the winter,else you fish some very well stocked waters lol...
    Last edited by whitty; 06-12-2019 at 14:44.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Always struck me as the sort of thing the French go in for.

  8. #28
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Dave it always was a thing done more on the continent,in France most matches were three hours,dont know if that is still the case,but if so they have not got to wrestle in the wind so long,lol.

  9. #29

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Quote Originally Posted by whitty View Post
    No,poles are not clumsy and all fishing is best done in a smooth practiced manner,but holding a pole in a stiff breeze when its cold,trying to get bites is bloody awful,and dont tell me you haven't done it,in winter leagues etc. Also i revert to my earlier post that unless your balling bait in,loose feed travels in a tow,at times some distance,several metres,thus making it difficult on the pole,because it is more suited to being held in place,so much so you tend not to realise how much its towing and wonder why bites are so slow to come...




    As for not waiting that long Kev,i take it you dont fish the pole in the winter,else you fish some very well stocked waters lol...
    Hi Alan
    I think my answer about clumsy was actually more in response to other comments - as I know you know about pole fishing.

    Hemp fishing is an interesting one.
    Tony Marshall is one of the acknowledged experts at the method on the match circuit.
    he fishes the method on the pole exclusively - even on some pretty fast flowing sections of the trent. In such flows, he uses a long line method (5 sections or more) so that he can search the area of loose feed falling through the water column.
    The big reason for using the pole is to ensure that the line follows the float exactly and doesn't pull it off course at all. It also helps with hitting bites when they are cagey.
    On top if that he's a brilliant angler (which helps)

  10. #30
    Join Date
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    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    I too first began using a pole in the 1970s. For me it was another method to be learned and used when conditions dictated. Currently I have three poles and a 7m whip. They sit along side my float rods for the river, float rods for still water and feeder rods. Basically just another club in the bag, offering an option. With regards to skill, every angling technique requires a skill level if you are to fish successfully. I do accept that some people can get obsessed with the pole. The trick is knowing when to use it and when not. A bit like the centre pin really. Pete
    Casternets

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