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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    There
    Posts
    5,363

    Default To pole or not to pole

    That is the question!
    There has been a little bit of friendly banter on here about using/not using a pole.

    I don't use one very often but have recently re elasticated my old pole of about 30 years of age vintage.
    Its a dinosaur to be honest and only manageable for about 7 to 8 Meters. I prefer yards but that isn't right in pole parlance.

    Today(HDYGO) I would have struggled to catch much with even a long rod. The fish wanted it laying on in the flow at a distance beyond rod range. At least any rod I own. The wind was also a factor.

    There are limited venues fishing well for me locally at the moment so just getting silvers to bite was a bonus. I wanted to get away from going back to carp dominated waters again as I am all carped out what with the rivers being in their current state.

    I think a pole gives just another option for decent presentation and would not use one exclusively like some do.
    Another string to ones bow in fact.

    Do you stick at rod and reel come what may?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Yorkshire.
    Posts
    10,820

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    I own a pole and a damned good one (in its day). However, it rarely sees daylight. I don't really fish anywhere that it would be particularly useful and I do prefer a running line. However, if my venues changed, I'd have no hesitation in using a pole again. I'd certainly rather fish a pole than leger. There's a time and place for most methods though.

  3. #3

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Why anyone woukd cut themselves off from a method that has as many applications and variations as other methods is a mystery to me.

    I've used poles since the mid 1970's. The first one, a modified Shakespeare 6m telescopic with a home-made elastic system, was the answer to a canal swim that had a fast-running overflow on the near bank and a big reed-bed with flow going the other way across. With a little bit of peacock and a long line, you could flick the float across and hold the line away from the runner flow and bag up with bream and tench that nobody else caught because floatfished rigs simply pulled out of place. The Shakey was replaced with a glass Garbolino SLV. I had to go to Wimbledon to buy this rare import.

    Poles just extend your ability to come up with the answer to all kinds of fishing challenges. It's a pleasure to fish with them and in many situations they are unbeatable. I've caught every species I've caught on rod and line, including grayling, barbel and pike, on a pole. I often choose to use a long rod and pin these days for things I could do with a pole, but I wouldn't handicap myself by using a pole exclusively or avoiding using them.

    Occasionally I hear people describe poles as "clumsy", which makes me question whether they've noticed the pinpoint accuracy of plumbing, feeding, placing your float, the opportunity to control exactly how your bait falls in front of the fish, and the ability to use a fraction of the weight other methods need.

    Nor is it all about hanging on like grim death to 13m or more of unwieldy carbon. Most of the fish I catch on a pole these days come from between 6 and 10m out, and at these lengths the pole I use probably weighs less than the float rods I started fishing with.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
    Posts
    3,788
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    For me the pole has been directly responsible for the loss of many 'skills' that held you apart from others,casting and feeding to far bank trees/snags/features,i own three,two havent been out for a long time,one a margin pole gets used for crucians,bream and tench occasionally,i only enjoy decent,net sized fish on the pole,smaller fish on it dont do it for me,my main dislike about poles is when bites are at a premium and you have to hold the things for ages,especially in the cold,rod and line for me all the way...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Luton Bedfordshire.
    Posts
    3,788
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Quote Originally Posted by nottskev View Post
    Why anyone woukd cut themselves off from a method that has as many applications and variations as other methods is a mystery to me.

    I've used poles since the mid 1970's. The first one, a modified Shakespeare 6m telescopic with a home-made elastic system, was the answer to a canal swim that had a fast-running overflow on the near bank and a big reed-bed with flow going the other way across. With a little bit of peacock and a long line, you could flick the float across and hold the line away from the runner flow and bag up with bream and tench that nobody else caught because floatfished rigs simply pulled out of place. The Shakey was replaced with a glass Garbolino SLV. I had to go to Wimbledon to buy this rare import.

    Poles just extend your ability to come up with the answer to all kinds of fishing challenges. It's a pleasure to fish with them and in many situations they are unbeatable. I've caught every species I've caught on rod and line, including grayling, barbel and pike, on a pole. I often choose to use a long rod and pin these days for things I could do with a pole, but I wouldn't handicap myself by using a pole exclusively or avoiding using them.

    Occasionally I hear people describe poles as "clumsy", which makes me question whether they've noticed the pinpoint accuracy of plumbing, feeding, placing your float, the opportunity to control exactly how your bait falls in front of the fish, and the ability to use a fraction of the weight other methods need.

    Nor is it all about hanging on like grim death to 13m or more of unwieldy carbon. Most of the fish I catch on a pole these days come from between 6 and 10m out, and at these lengths the pole I use probably weighs less than the float rods I started fishing with.
    If i never held another pole again it wouldnt bother me in the slightest Kev,and ive caught decent barbel,carp,tench,chub,perch on them,but to me fishing these days is about enjoyment and pole fishing doesnt give me that,at all,each to their own,but because i dont match fish these days im not forced to use one,heaven....

  6. #6

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Well, this is clearly a thread for insomniacs,( I lay awake half the night worrying about insomnia!)!
    I’m with nottskev, when you need pinpoint accuracy such as tight feeding,placing a bait against cover or holding a bait stationary against a flow/ undertow, then nothing touches a pole.
    However I prefer running line for the sensations of playing a good fish as I find having a fish bouncing around on a piece of elastic feels a bit remote.
    My own use of the pole is mainly keeping one in the pike kit for bait snatching as a small ( cheap 8-9m “beginners”) pole and a couple of winders takes up less space, weight and set up time than a rod reel, and also a top 2 or 3 ( or a whip) is a great way to introduce a newbie to fishing, you can get them fishing within seconds and not spend all afternoon untangling, very useful with my current apprentice aged 5 1/2!
    Finally, I do resort to a pole in the depths of winter when I need the accuracy thing.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  7. #7

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    Well I must confess that a few months ago I bought a 8m system whip. There are a few spots with overhanging trees where I can now ship the float out into position. It is also sometimes used for laying on.

    Although it does have its uses and some advantages it is an ugly way to fish - so for me it's rod and line whenever possible.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lancashire
    Posts
    1,679

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    I’ve had one for a couple of years now, it’s just a 8 metre margin pole, but as mentioned it’s another method which works well for silvers tench and crucians,
    I don’t use it on my new fishery because the carp fight so hard here, they just zoom of and break the nylon, one even broke the pole when I used 16 to 20s elastic in it.

    But it’s a good method I’ve had some cracking fish on it, I particularly like the accuracy it gives me, feeding and fishing in a small area, works well for silvers, most of the time I just use two sections and a top kit, so it’s easy to use at that length, like it a lot more than I thought i would.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Leicestershire
    Posts
    661

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    I have 3 poles all left to me by my late brother. I’ve not got a clue how to use them. I’m pretty sure they are mixed up between each other and no idea how to sort them . I’ve used whips when taking my kids fishing but preferred the running line.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    585
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: To pole or not to pole

    I like to be comfortable in a proper chair when I'm fishing and by most accounts I've read a chair isn't really practical when using a pole. Poles clearly have a massive advantage over running lines in some situations, canals in particular. I just find the running line so versatile and enjoy overcoming (sometimes!) the challenges it does present.

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