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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    South Yorkshire.
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    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    With all the different opinions it's obvious, there are several things that could cause bumping.
    From, too strong a rod, too soft a rod, poor hook hold, bad timing of a strike, hook spring and aggressively playing. All have been blamed at some time.
    One idea that I thought was hook spring. 911 16s were notorious for springing, they were my favoured pattern for both method and bomb. Now I refuse to use them, I even steer away from even 911 extra strong now., preferring a stronger hook.
    It's just something that we come across, I doubt there's any definitive reason

  2. #12

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Quote Originally Posted by Richox12 View Post
    i'm surprised that the Super Spades don't create any issue as they have a slightly inturned 'beak' point. I'd have thought a straight point would bump less.

    I use animals also and they have a slightly inturned point and same as the super spades they give great hook ups and hook holds.
    All the hooks I use are micro barbed, I don't get on with barbless for several reasons.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Yorkshire.
    Posts
    11,097

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Quote Originally Posted by tigger View Post
    During the summer months I catch hundreds of dace, many being proper tiddlers. I’ve found however many maggots on the hook the tiddlers have no problem squashing them into their mouths. What does stop the tiddlers engulfing the maggots is the size and gape of the hook. They can squash maggots but can’t squash the gape of the hook. I’ve found most tiddly fish I catch, including minnows can get a 14s superspade in their mouths but a size 12’s is too wide for many of them.
    Absolutely, in the summer months you'll still get pestered when they are really going for it. I've somehow managed to catch minnows on hooks that definitely can not fit in their mouths. However, I rarely fish a hook bigger than a 16 on my local river, because I'm simply not going for the same stamp of fish you are, they aren't there in any numbers to go at so it's pointless me pretending. You are actively trying to dissuade the tiddlers. For this precise reason, we have different approaches and experiences. There are plenty of ways to skin a cat, even if the cats aren't quite the same. However, fishing the way you do is less likely to show up a rod for being in any way culpable when bumping fish. I'd go as far as suggesting that you'd probably have no issues with rods that I will no longer use. We aren't fishing the same waters in the same way for similarly sized fish. Even beyond the normal differences between individual anglers, we are bound to have different experiences.

  4. #14

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Bumping fish is always going to happen from time to time. It seems to occur more in the colder months when fish are not feeding so agressively. Usual reasons for me are big bait/small fish or striking a bit too early.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    leafy cheshire
    Posts
    13,535

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Interesting thread. I lose/ bump off fish all the time and put that down to general incompetence particularly when on the float. I have been guilty of using a hook too many times and this I no longer do. I often strike too gently and with a slack line so miss the fish. I seek improvement and adopt stronger hooks. I have had 911 and Drennan red maggot hooks in sizes 16 to 20 open up causing the loss of a fish which I was convinced was properly hooked. I lose far fewer on the feeder and I suspect the reasons are obvious. I have had a hook gape open with a bream which defies belief. If it was easy we would get bored.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Yorkshire.
    Posts
    11,097

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    There are so many things that can contribute to bumped fish. However, some days will be worse than others regardless of the gear being used.

    As far as I'm concerned, contributing equipment factors are going to include -

    1) Hooks, size, pattern and sharpness can all have an influence. I tend to use single maggots a lot. Simply varying the hook size can alter hooking efficiency. I tend to bury a hook in a single maggot as many would with a caster. When doing so, a wider gape hook helps a lot. However, sometimes going up a size or two can help, even if it does seem counter-intuitive. Blunted or turned over hook points don't penetrate properly.

    2) Bait type and the way it's hooked. Similar to point 2, just hooking a maggot differently can change results. The same applies to other baits, without even needing to go as far as introducing hair rigs into the equation.

    3) Rod choice. Some obviously disagree, but I've no doubt at all that a rod will make a difference. There's a reason why float rods have a certain action and power. There's a reason why people don't use powerful rods for everything.

    4) Line choice. This one will really make some think I'm doolally. Use a very low stretch line, especially braid, and the amount of fish you bump will increase. To lessen the effect, you can use a lighter actioned, less powerful, rod. That was a significant factor in me going away from the use of braid for trotting. It was impacting on my rod choice too much.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Isle of Onamower
    Posts
    744

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    As we're onto hooks now and I know I've said it before but I bump and lose far fewer fish when using heavier wire 'X' gauge patterns, which in turn have become the norm for me.

    I'm convinced that finer wire hooks 'bounce' their gape open and closed during rapid head shaking of even quite small fish, especially when first hooked.

    I'm struggling to find any other explanation for it and my own observations, which will go against the grain of many, are that a heavier gauge hook will allow a bait to fall more naturally amongst loose feed as the line acts as a brake as it cuts through the water, hence the heavier weight speeding up the hookbait to the speed of the loose feed.

    Try it next time you're out, you might be surprised.
    Born to mow... Long grass is our enemy!

  8. #18

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    I forgot to mention, but others have said it, that checking your hooks and changing them if in any doubt is vital. A couple of bumped fish after hooking plenty of others points to a hook blunting. Another clue: when you can feel that your hook is not going into a maggot or caster as effortlessly as a really sharp hook, it's time to change it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    The Nene Valley
    Posts
    12,538

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    The main problem with bumping, however you wish to define it, is that the 'bumped' fish tends to spook the shoal far more than hooking a fish and landing it...............
    That's about as big as a fish that big gets
    If you understand what you’re doing, you’re not learning anything................

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Stuck on the chuffin M25 somewhere between Heathrow and the A3
    Posts
    11,679

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Bumping the odd fish is imo just one of those things. That said I “bump” more grayling than any other fish...or did until I started using a slightly softer rod and incorporating a microswivel in my rig....sometimes with a bit of pole elastic. Looks odd but the difference was amazing in terms of fish “ bumped” and lost.

    Dace can be a pain too but I put that down to lightning quick bites and my slowing reflexes. I do think rod action is an issue...or can be. I don’t seem to bump any other species, not enough to make me think I’m doing something wrong or using too fierce a rod.

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