Thanks Thanks:  2
Likes Likes:  26
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 42
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Azide the Stour
    Posts
    3,978

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    I like to use very fine wire hooks for a lot of my roach fishing. I accept that I have to control the strike carefully and use fine mainlines to gain some stretch. I've tried the thick wire hooks for this type of fishing and my results are dire if I do so.

    With grayling I fished for them a lot about ten years ago and quickly found a medium wire size 18 barbless the best by far; strike hard, play them hard and lose very few. Thick wire barbed don't penetrate that well, and the other benefit of barbless is that it's so much easier to unhook squirming grayling (and roach, dace etc.)

    I'm starting to use barbless for most of my river fishing (I converted to barbless for stillwaters years ago) aprt from chub fishing in weedy water.

  2. #22

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Regarding barbless hooks, I choose not to use them because imo they do far too much unseen damage to the fish.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    The Nene Valley
    Posts
    12,536

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Yes, mainly because many do not know how to unhook a barbed - that's where the damage is done...........
    That's about as big as a fish that big gets
    If you understand what you’re doing, you’re not learning anything................

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Isle of Onamower
    Posts
    742

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Wintle View Post
    I've tried the thick wire hooks for this type of fishing and my results are dire if I do so.
    What do you put that down to Mark?

    Is it an adjustment in the shotting that's required, to compensate for the heavier hook or is it just down to the (supposed?) higher visibility of the hook?

    I was always bought up to believe that hooks should be as fine as you could get away with, especially when fishing on the drop but my own observations have told me that a hooked bait actually falls slower due to the aforementioned drag effect caused by the trailing line having to cut through the water and I've caught Roach whilst observing the larger ones backing off and ghosting away from what I presume is a slower falling bait to that of the loose feed?

    I could of course whip on a finer wire hook but that would mean an even slower (than the loose feed and therefore more unnatural) fall rate of the bait.

    I've not tried it to be honest as the logic doesn't stack up but if I remember I might give it a go come the Summer, on the same water where it's possible to observe, just to see if it makes a difference.
    Born to mow... Long grass is our enemy!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Azide the Stour
    Posts
    3,978

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Quote Originally Posted by Aknib View Post
    What do you put that down to Mark?

    Is it an adjustment in the shotting that's required, to compensate for the heavier hook or is it just down to the (supposed?) higher visibility of the hook?

    I was always bought up to believe that hooks should be as fine as you could get away with, especially when fishing on the drop but my own observations have told me that a hooked bait actually falls slower due to the aforementioned drag effect caused by the trailing line having to cut through the water and I've caught Roach whilst observing the larger ones backing off and ghosting away from what I presume is a slower falling bait to that of the loose feed?

    I could of course whip on a finer wire hook but that would mean an even slower (than the loose feed and therefore more unnatural) fall rate of the bait.

    I've not tried it to be honest as the logic doesn't stack up but if I remember I might give it a go come the Summer, on the same water where it's possible to observe, just to see if it makes a difference.
    I've done so much on the drop fishing - well over 40 years - that it's almost instinctive to get the shotting right. My Stour fishing nowadays is almost entirely tares in summer/early autumn, bread in winter, but a I do a lot of stillwater fishing on the drop with maggots all year round. Ivan Marks reckoned much smaller, lighter hooks than most used, and I'll stick with his thinking.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Isle of Onamower
    Posts
    742

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Wintle View Post
    I've done so much on the drop fishing - well over 40 years - that it's almost instinctive to get the shotting right. My Stour fishing nowadays is almost entirely tares in summer/early autumn, bread in winter, but a I do a lot of stillwater fishing on the drop with maggots all year round. Ivan Marks reckoned much smaller, lighter hooks than most used, and I'll stick with his thinking.
    It's a good enough reason.

    It's still a curious conflict with what I've observed myself and there's no right or wrongs especially when you take into account the finicky variations in different waters but it does make me wonder and I still can't square it in my mind.

    Maggot or small particle bait attached to hook = bait sinks quicker than loose feed.

    Maggot or small particle bait attached to hook with trailing line = bait sinks slower than loose feed.

    Does that suggest that fish in general will intercept the slower falling baits, irrespective of speed, just because they are easier pickings at the depth in the water where the fish are sitting (dependent upon conditions and competition) but the larger and wiser (?) specimens aren't buying it because they've noticed the difference?

    It would tie in nicely, Ivan was very much the legendary match fisherman and not noted for specimen fishing.

    On the water where I made my observations I couldn't juggle shot around to try and compensate for it because it's shallow to begin with (a silted up dam around twenty inches deep) and the fish were hitting the bait in the first ten inches of water, they were wary and there really wasn't that much depth to play with.
    Born to mow... Long grass is our enemy!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Dorset
    Posts
    1,301

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    I am reading this thread with interest and am somewhat confused by what is being discussed. "Bumping fish" for me, is the occasion when you strike, feel instant contact and then nothing. I would interperate that as an instance when the fish has taken the bait, hence the contact but, for what ever reason, the hook has not set. This can happen, the bait can mask the hook and prevent penetration. We have all had maggots double over on a hook at one time. In this given situation it will matter not what type of rod you use, when you time the strike, or any other factor you want to consider, the fish is not in a position to be hooked. So you just shrug your shoulders and carry on. By way of illustration I recall fishing a match back in the 1960s and during a slack period went to see how my mate Frank Barlow was getting on. 23 roach and 6 b*stards, he said. So it's an unsolvable age old problem. The majority of comments on this thread are about losing fish off the hook, which is definitely about hooks, rods, the balance of tackle etc and something to which there is a resolution, if you can work it out. So bumping fish you have to live with, losing fish off the hook you don't. Pete.
    Casternets

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    There
    Posts
    5,572

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Mikench's post brought to mind another aspect. Mike you mention losing fish off the hook. Correct me if I am wrong but I interpret that as having a fish on for a short while and not strictly bumping.
    Those lost like this I believe are more prevalent in heavier stocked club lakes or commercials type waters. I think that this is likely to be foul hooking after a line bite.
    Carp particularly will pick up line on their anal fins with shot maybe catching behind the fin against the body for a second or two putting a bend in the rod and then it going slack.

    Also I have had strong hooks like Animals opening up which I believe were foul hook ups on a scale on a carp which resulted in pressure at an acute angle causing the opening up.
    Like bumping feeling but lasting a second or two instead of the almost instant bump.

  9. #29

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Interesting thread I remember reading ivan marks on bumping fish off the hook his advice was to use smaller hooks which encourage a more positive bite. And line that has stretch I think he was right as usual.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,266

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    The action of the rod is vitally important but also consider slack lines verses tight lines - or a hard strike to set the hook or a lift type strike to set the hook home properly.

    A grappling hook scenario!
    If you were James Bond intent on 'grappling' Miss Moneypenny by getting into her top floor penthouse skylight, how would you go about scaling the walls using a grappling hook and a rope?
    A. Give it a good tug to set it or B. apply gentle pressure first?

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •