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  1. #31

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Quote Originally Posted by sam vimes View Post

    4) Line choice. This one will really make some think I'm doolally. Use a very low stretch line, especially braid, and the amount of fish you bump will increase. To lessen the effect, you can use a lighter actioned, less powerful, rod. That was a significant factor in me going away from the use of braid for trotting. It was impacting on my rod choice too much.
    You're not going mad. I fish braid on the waggler - sometimes I have to as it's the best line for the job. And I have to use a soft/mellow rod. It's by far the best combination.

  2. #32

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Quote Originally Posted by Richox12 View Post
    You're not going mad. I fish braid on the waggler - sometimes I have to as it's the best line for the job. And I have to use a soft/mellow rod. It's by far the best combination.
    That's interesting - under what circumstances do you use braid on the waggler? Ages ago, I bought a spool of Fireline - I think it's 4lb - thinking I'd try it for something or other. It's still here in its box.

    Not surprising to hear that braid demands "give" somewhere in the set up. When I first tried it for the feeder in the late 90's, even with a soft rod (Shakespeare Quattro) I soon bought some little stretchy links, about 12" long, that went between braid and hooklength. And even then, you picked the rod up gingerly.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Devon
    Posts
    532

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Very good points made already, so apologies if repeating.
    I think a lot of it comes down to if the fish are taking well or not, I've noticed this particularly with Grayling, some days I hook and land the vast majority, other days vitually all of them seem to fall off.
    Same thing when fishing the fly for trout.
    Re. Grayling again, I reckon hooks with slightly curved in points and heavier wire are more successful.
    When I occasinally trot with a fixed spool, I find a prime "bumping off" time is after the strike and initial hold, when I am putting the bail back over to start retrieving.

  4. #34

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Fishing for small roach, say 2oz - 4oz - up in the water. It's those days when they are moving around a lot and maybe not 'having it' and you get lots of bites you miss no matter what depth and how much/little you feed etc. With nylon you might miss a bite, leave it, miss another bite, reel in and recast. With braid you can get a bite, 'twitch' it to set the hook. If you miss then you will move the float less and get 3 or 4 attempts at hooking something. More time in the water basically..

  5. #35

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    My opinion FWIW - I think we can lump pretty much all fish that come off within a couple of seconds of the strike in the "bumped off" category - even those that come off "for no reason" after a couple of turns on the reel handle.
    The hook has been set inadequately - maybe not deep enough - maybe in to fragile a hook hold (eg. on the edge of the lip).
    Putting aside all the other variables I'd also agree with the OP and the ananym that a larger, thicker wire hook will theoretically achieve a better hookhold,

    However - I also know from experience that I will get many more bites on many occasions by using a smaller, finer gauge hook. Therefore to maximise the catch I need to compromise. A rod that is well balanced to the hooks I use does help that efficiency.

    And lastly - as a real example - I've done a lot of rod & line canal fishing with tiny fine wire hooks over the years. Often this is for soft mouthed skimmers and roach. I use a specifically soft rod for this type of fishing that is much more efficient than a standard float rod at turning bites in to fish in the net.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,266

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Do you pole anglers experience less 'bumping off' due to the cushioning effect of elastic?

    I use a whip quite a lot in the summer and just let a foot or so of excess line lay across the water 'slack', and whip it sideways to set the hook home whenever the float disappears. The amount of slack line will often determine how much 'cushioning' is imparted to prevent bump off's.

  7. #37

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Elastic strength is related to hook size and strength in use (at least as much as it is to size of fish).
    If you use 12 elastic set tight with a size 24 fine wire then you will bump lots of fish.
    Equally - you'll struggle to hook up with a size 8 forged whilst using a no.2 elastic

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Yorkshire.
    Posts
    11,093

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Too heavy an elastic will result in more bumped smaller fish in exactly the same way as using too powerful a rod can.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,266

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    Yep. Just as I thought.... Crabtree was a union rep!

    The same principles apply to modern day elastic.


  10. #40

    Default Re: The term "bumping fish"

    I've trotted with a 1.75lb test rod and had no problem hitting and catching everything from minnows to barbel. No bumped fish either.
    The way I see it, if I hook (good hook hold) a small fish with a powerful rod the fish just gets dragged through the water a bit on the strike. If I hook a larger fish then the hook has a larger thicker lip to grip into and so the rod tip just bends more rather than the fish being dragged through the water.
    It does happen from time to time and I do bump/loose the odd fish on the strike, but usually it turns out to be a blunt hook or the hook simply hasn't got a good hold and has just come free from the fish.

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