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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Eltham, SE London
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    3,984

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    I fished the river Medway near Wateringbury for two days last week. I didn't have any two pounders but loads of decent roach around the pound mark.

    On day one I fished bread with liquidised bread and hemp as ground bait. On day two I float and feeder fished maggots and worm. The bread really sorted out the better specimens and I would guess the average size was at least double when using bread.

    I did have a few bonus skimmers and a few perch on maggots and worm. I hadn't fished this particular stretch of river previously and not at Wateringbury for donkey's years, so I was really pleased with what I caught. All the fish seemed healthy enough and had no signs of predator attack.
    Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split, as a general thing.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    Lydney, in the Forest of Dean
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    9,147

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Bonney View Post
    The thing is Paul,while the barbel are being hunted the roach are left in peace to grow
    Oh! no they aren't Fred and well you know it, the barbel raid the spawning beds which has helped decimate the numbers of roach and dace on the traditional roach rivers that have had barbel introduced. Don't get me wrong, I love catching barbel just as I do all coarse fish except perhaps carp but there is no denying the fact that those rivers that had barbel introduced suffered a decline in roach and dace as a consequence. Even the most ardent barbelite would have to admit that if he knew anything about our rivers that is.

    After many years the barbel numbers decrease plus they spread out over the full length of the river which in turn sees a return of the roach and dace but they never get back to their previous numbers, in the case of the Severn it took nearly 40 years for this to happen.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
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    3,474
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    It's not quite as bad as Ron paints it a bit further North! The 'industrial' rivers of West Yorkshire still give excellent roach fishing and there are even some biggies if you know where to look.

    I'm planning a roach campaign this winter so watch this space!

    Remember that much of the fishing we remember from the 50's, 60's and 70's was on polluted or recovering rivers and it does seem that roach prefer their environment on the mucky side. I can remember the Calder and the Aire in the late 80's producing some real quality roach, but as the water cleaned up the fishing gradually declined. The Calder still has excellent roach fishing, but doesn't produce the stamp of fish it used to, whilst the Aire suffers dreadfully from insecticide pollution from sheep dip, which makes the coarse fish population marginal.

    Even the cleanliness of our rivers is managed on an industrial scale, with chemically cleaned water, laced with a weird cocktail of hormones, drug residues and insecticide being pumped back into them. Rivers in the UK have been polluted for as long as people have lived near them and fish have benefitted from this until the rise of industrial society.
    The Old Pedant

    Quot homines, tot sententiae. My blog

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Rotherham South Yorkshire
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    So are we all to see the roach go the way of the burbot?

    Actually Graham you have made a few good points regarding barbel.

    Dare I say it? Yes I will.

    I would like to see The Barbel Society and all the other specialist groups throw off their exclusivity for one species of fish and all get together to reform the National Association of Specialist Anglers again.

    The fragmentation we have seen amongst many anglers, each fragment fishing for one species of fish, we can do without! We are entering a new era where solidarity amongst all who fish with rod and line, against the government and the antis, is becoming more and more important.

    I do hope that many will recognise that the single species groups are retrograde.
    Last edited by Ron The Hat Clay; 08-11-2009 at 12:09.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Torquay .....with my reputation??
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    The river Sow in Stafford is a prime example of how a quality Roach river can be decimated by so called improvements and flood defence schemes, I fished with a few old boys in my youth in Stafford and they told me of the days when Roach anglers travelled hundreds of miles to fish it in the town and above until it was lowered becoming nothing more than a shallow stream in places choked with weed ,such a shame as some is free fishing but now you would have to pay me to fish parts of it.
    Fancy a pint?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
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    Rotherham South Yorkshire
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Meeghan View Post
    It's not quite as bad as Ron paints it a bit further North! The 'industrial' rivers of West Yorkshire still give excellent roach fishing and there are even some biggies if you know where to look.

    I'm planning a roach campaign this winter so watch this space!

    Remember that much of the fishing we remember from the 50's, 60's and 70's was on polluted or recovering rivers and it does seem that roach prefer their environment on the mucky side. I can remember the Calder and the Aire in the late 80's producing some real quality roach, but as the water cleaned up the fishing gradually declined. The Calder still has excellent roach fishing, but doesn't produce the stamp of fish it used to, whilst the Aire suffers dreadfully from insecticide pollution from sheep dip, which makes the coarse fish population marginal.

    Even the cleanliness of our rivers is managed on an industrial scale, with chemically cleaned water, laced with a weird cocktail of hormones, drug residues and insecticide being pumped back into them. Rivers in the UK have been polluted for as long as people have lived near them and fish have benefitted from this until the rise of industrial society.
    Thanks for your input on this thread Sean.

    We must try and get together and catch some of the big roach in West Yorkshire. It's a part of Yorkshire I don't know too well/

    See you at Haxey.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Domus in colle Lincolnshire Wolds
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    Ah but Graham, they are there and in good numbers now though.
    We can all relate to things that shouldn't have been done,all water under the bridge now.
    Can't agree with Bob about the Trent either, although to be fair I haven't yet had a good go at the tidal.

    ---------- Post added at 13:15 ---------- Previous post was at 13:09 ----------

    and Ron, you really must get up to date!!!

    Avon Roach Project Latest News

    ---------- Post added at 13:18 ---------- Previous post was at 13:15 ----------

    and

    http://www.fishingmagic.com/forums/c...-presents.html


    Note the theme!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Rotherham South Yorkshire
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    So when are we to have a roach fishing week at Sutton Fred.

    There are a few good roach in that part of the Trent I can assure you.

    Come in Steve Pope.

    ---------- Post added at 06:25 ---------- Previous post was at 06:20 ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Bonney View Post
    Ah but Graham, they are there and in good numbers now though.
    We can all relate to things that shouldn't have been done,all water under the bridge now.
    Can't agree with Bob about the Trent either, although to be fair I haven't yet had a good go at the tidal.

    ---------- Post added at 13:15 ---------- Previous post was at 13:09 ----------

    and Ron, you really must get up to date!!!

    Avon Roach Project Latest News

    ---------- Post added at 13:18 ---------- Previous post was at 13:15 ----------

    and

    http://www.fishingmagic.com/forums/c...-presents.html


    Note the theme!
    Fred, I can't applaud what the BS are doing more. Does this mean you are leading the specialist angling world back to a new NASA?

    If this is so I will re-join you tomorrow.

    Mind you I never did leave NASA.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    Domus in colle Lincolnshire Wolds
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    Join up Ron and you can fish Sutton.

    We had an open day,advertised on here

    http://www.fishingmagic.com/forums/c...ton-trent.html

    There will be more, and you can fish for what you like.

    I'm not certain about something similar to NASA, who knows though from acorns etc etc

  10. Default

    The main reason for the 'vanishing specimen river roach' are cormorants.
    You missed out the tiny River Torne when you named your local roach rivers Ron. This river, along with the others you mentioned, was alive with specimens until the last 10 to 15 years.
    All the rivers mentioned, Wensum, Severn etc, all have the odd remaining shoal of specimen redfins that have escaped the black death, but they are isolated cases. If you want to find good roach on the rivers these days, look for stretches that either have an active keeper (who shoots the cormorants) A stretch with lots of trees lining the banks (that prevents them landing and taking off) or a stretch lined with houses or that's popular with dog walkers (human activity scares them away)
    It's no coincidence that when you find such a length of river, good redfins are often present.

    Also take into account abstraction, more barbel being introduced into rivers (I've no evidence that this is a reason, but the rivers can only support x amount of fish) and the reduction of flood relief channels (like the old dead arm off the Idle at Bawtry) and the future of my favourite fish in rivers looks grim.

    Luckily, I do know local stretches of rivers that will allow me to catch roach to well over a pound, but that was once possible from nearly every stretch of every river.
    Last edited by Michael Townsend 3; 08-11-2009 at 12:30.

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