Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Page 1 of 8 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 72
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Rotherham South Yorkshire
    Posts
    32,331
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Just what has happened to the specimen river roach?

    I grew up in a small village, near to Worksop. It wasn't in Nottinghamshire but only just in Yorkshire, but there, only a cycle ride away, were the Rivers Ryton, Idle, Roche, Maun, Meden and Poulter.

    Today, due to aquifer abstraction, a couple of those streams are mere trickles, however in my youth, they contained good fish of several species, the most notable being the roach of the river Idle.

    However even this river paled into insignificance when compared with the Hampshire Avon and some of the other Southern streams. But due to distances and cost, the ability to fish these rivers was forbidden to myself, and still is now.

    But something has happened, even to rivers like the Hampshire Avon. In most cases the roach are not there, not in reasonable quantity. And where are the big roach of the Wensum, and the other Norfolk rivers? Even the Severn, that maginificent waterway, the river that gave me my biggest ever roach is not what it was. Why in the early 90s you could fish a light link leger or stret peg with a stick float and catch up to 30 lbs of prime redfins, some of which went over the magic 2lbs mark. Men like Bill Leavesley and Des Taylor, both of Bewdley put me onto some marvellous roach fishing. As Bill Leavesley once told me, a 1 1/2 pound Severn roach is worth more than a hundred Borises.

    But today, the fabulous catches are no more.

    Thank goodness we few roach enthusiasts in the north have The Don, The Idle, the Rother and of course the mighty Trent.

    2 pounders might be rare from these waters, many brilliant roach anglers of the past never even topped 2lbs from the Idle, a river known for producing very big roach. But I think that the realists amongst us are prepared to set our sights a little lower and appreaciate that a one pound roach is a thing of true beauty, magnificence, and a "gentle giant" as John Bailey describes them. And when you think about it, just how many one pound roach are taken from rivers today?

    Are you planning a roach campaign this winter?
    Last edited by Ron The Hat Clay; 08-11-2009 at 07:29.

  2. Default

    A 2lb river roach has always been a rare critter, even in the best days on the Severn a lot of roach had to be caught to get amongst the big fish.......sure we all fluked a fast one or two but amassing a bag was in my experience the best way.

    I always have to have my roach trips during the winter Ron, and i have the perfect place lined up that still gives bags of them in the right conditions.

    A tip i will give is to explore big river backwaters when the main river is tearing through and especially on the run off.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Rotherham South Yorkshire
    Posts
    32,331
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I used to fish a classic "Mr Crabtree" cattle drink on the Ryton in my youth, near a village called Blyth. When the river was up in autumn and winter, I caught quite a few good roach up to 1 lb 11 oz from this spot by laying on with a redworm.

    I remember a small drain which fed into the tidal Trent near the village of Littleborough. Not only was this a good pike spot, we caught excellent roach, loads of bleak and the odd chub and dace. The best bait was redworm. It fished very well after the Trent had flooded.

    Do you know, I'll bet that spot has never been fished in yonks. Who knows what might be swimming under its dark surface.

    But in those days we were for ever prospecting and exploring for new water.

    I don't think the average angler does this anymore.
    Last edited by Ron The Hat Clay; 08-11-2009 at 09:03.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Domus in colle Lincolnshire Wolds
    Posts
    13,833
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    The Lower Severn gave me some good roach on a recent visit, without really trying!
    Still too far to travel for adays fishing though!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lydney, in the Forest of Dean
    Posts
    9,147

    Default

    The Severn still has some good roach fishing if you know where to fish and one of the best places is Stan Lewis's water above Bewdley as I have said more than once on here and now is the time to fish it. The lower Severn holds some big roach shoals and my biggest roach of 2.5lb came from Kempsey below Worcester but the best roach fishing by far is Hereford on the town water where roach in excess of 2lb and even a few over 3lb are regularly weighed in on the Hereford AA matches.

    I think roach are more shoaled up in tight areas than they used to be in years gone by and I, like most anglers of a certain age can remember when roach were pretty much spread throughout a river, they were the matchmans target fish on most of them including the Trent. Many is the time I have weighed in big weights on the Trent matches and comprising mainly of roach with the odd chub thrown in.

    They have declined in numbers quite plainly but there are still pockets of them in those rivers that once held massive shoals but why the decline? I don't know but from my knowledge of the Severn after the barbel were introduced when the roach (and dace incidentally) all but disappeared I think maybe the dreaded barbel has a lot of questions to answer along with the black death of course.

  6. Default

    You are soc on Graham, there are fewe
    r pockets of roach but they are still there......my PB came from Hereford a few years back now, not one of the "3's" but getting there.

    Hereford is indeed a great roach stretch and thankfully still is but i used to know of a couple of other "pockets" that seem to have "gone"..........though the dace seem to be coming back well.

    It amazes me that some anglers seem to think of hemp/tares or hemp caster as summer baits, nuff said on that one, let em think it

    "Dreaded" barbel........i often wonder what the Severn and Teme would be like if the barbs hadn't been planted, .........

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Domus in colle Lincolnshire Wolds
    Posts
    13,833
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    The thing is Paul,while the barbel are being hunted the roach are left in peace to grow

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Rotherham South Yorkshire
    Posts
    32,331
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Williams 11 View Post
    You are soc on Graham, there are fewe
    r pockets of roach but they are still there......my PB came from Hereford a few years back now, not one of the "3's" but getting there.

    Hereford is indeed a great roach stretch and thankfully still is but i used to know of a couple of other "pockets" that seem to have "gone"..........though the dace seem to be coming back well.

    It amazes me that some anglers seem to think of hemp/tares or hemp caster as summer baits, nuff said on that one, let em think it

    "Dreaded" barbel........i often wonder what the Severn and Teme would be like if the barbs hadn't been planted, .........

    A hell of a lot better than they are now Brummie. I like barbel fishing and I have had some great times fishing for them, but only in the rivers where they belong.

    I often met many on my Severn roving days, not match anglers either, who cursed the barbel.

    It's a great shame that barbel have now permeated the full length of the Warks Avon.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    South Yorkshire
    Posts
    1,270

    Default

    Methinks Ron is angling for a bite!

    The river system you quote from your youth was destryoed circa 1980 when the largest pumps in Europe were installed below Haxey and the river was 'improved' by turning it into a trapezoidal 'fluid relief channel'. That's EA speak by the way.

    Yes, it prevented a quarter of a million acres of land from going under water each winter but that's progress, eh?

    Today much of the river is silting up as a result.

    Ironically the draining if the flood plain below Bawtry has run into difficulties because the rare marsh marigold has been threatened and the EA now deliberately allows the very land they recovered to flood. Unfortunately the fish go with the water and get stranded.

    In the past fish travelled both ways as the waters rose and fell but to facilitate the flooding a channel has been dug. Unfortunately it has a coffer dam adjacent the river which means fish can go over it on a flood but as the water level falls it maintains a depth of water behind it for marigolds to flourish and attract wading birds. Unfortunately the fish get stranded and as it slowly dries up they either die from suffocation or at the teeth of predators.

    Check out my March blog entry - 2/3rds down the page.

    here

    As for the bite you were looking for - the roach have been eaten by cormorants, it's as simple as that. Yes, a few catches are made each year on the Trent and the Idle but they're isolated and made when the fish shoal tighly.

    The tidal Trent used to come alive around the top of the tide with roach topping everywhere. Now you rarely see a one. That's because they are no longer there.

    River roach are an endangered species. Those who say, 'not in my neck of the woods' are simply kidding themselves. Enjoy it while you can because it's only a matter of time...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Rotherham South Yorkshire
    Posts
    32,331
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Oh by the way Brummie, casters are one of the best winter baits on the Idle, along with hemp, tares and creed wheat.

    ---------- Post added at 03:29 ---------- Previous post was at 03:19 ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Roberts View Post
    Methinks Ron is angling for a bite!

    The river system you quote from your youth was destryoed circa 1980 when the largest pumps in Europe were installed below Haxey and the river was 'improved' by turning it into a trapezoidal 'fluid relief channel'. That's EA speak by the way.

    Yes, it prevented a quarter of a million acres of land from going under water each winter but that's progress, eh?

    Today much of the river is silting up as a result.

    Ironically the draining if the flood plain below Bawtry has run into difficulties because the rare marsh marigold has been threatened and the EA now deliberately allows the very land they recovered to flood. Unfortunately the fish go with the water and get stranded.



    In the past fish travelled both ways as the waters rose and fell but to facilitate the flooding a channel has been dug. Unfortunately it has a coffer dam adjacent the river which means fish can go over it on a flood but as the water level falls it maintains a depth of water behind it for marigolds to flourish and attract wading birds. Unfortunately the fish get stranded and as it slowly dries up they either die from suffocation or at the teeth of predators.

    Check out my March blog entry - 2/3rds down the page.

    here

    As for the bite you were looking for - the roach have been eaten by cormorants, it's as simple as that. Yes, a few catches are made each year on the Trent and the Idle but they're isolated and made when the fish shoal tighly.

    The tidal Trent used to come alive around the top of the tide with roach topping everywhere. Now you rarely see a one. That's because they are no longer there.

    River roach are an endangered species. Those who say, 'not in my neck of the woods' are simply kidding themselves. Enjoy it while you can because it's only a matter of time...
    Thanks for responding Bob, I had hoped you would.

    So great rivers like the Idle and Trent, the days are numbered.

    Nothing to look forward to.

    The only thing we can do is join the Angling Trust and let our voices be heard.

Page 1 of 8 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •