Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  7
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,191

    Default Not something to brag about...

    I have just heard of a club water who have gained a new water and are informing members; 'as an added bonus contains chub'!

    It'll never happen, but if it was made illegal to stock Chub and Barbel in stillwater, would it encourage a few to fish rivers who might not otherwise?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    In God's County: Wiltshire
    Posts
    22,287
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    To my mind both Chub and Barbel belong in the river, and nowhere else.

    There are plenty of both species in my local rivers and to be honest I really try to avoid still waters, including commercials, where either, but particularly Barbel are stocked.

    So, personally, I would agree with the OP's thread title . . . . . it is most certainly not something to brag about

    Scholars have long known that fishing eventually turns men into philosophers.

    Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to buy decent tackle on a philosopher's salary. ~

    Patrick F. McManus






  3. #3

    Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    As young kid I used t fish a local water where the chub thrived, it was an old quarry with a very small inlet and a small stream running out. It must have been spring fed also as the outlet was twice the size of the inlet. The chub must have spawned successfully also as there was an abundance of year classes ranging from very small upwards. Those chubwhere the hardest fish in the water to catch and certainly harder to catch than river fish. I know of a few other waters (that one is long gone used as a land fill site) containing them where they seem to be doing well also so I don't think it's such a bad thing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,191

    Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    If what I read a few weeks back on a survey is anything to go by; upwards of 90% reckon its okay to stock these species in commercial stillwater, so you not alone in what you say.

    I personally think its cruel. Perhaps those chub you speak of have done well due to the flow of water on their gills... hope so thanks for your comment.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    4,536
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    I much prefer to catch chub in rivers of that there is no question. But if your quest is to catch an outsized fish, 7lb and above, then a stillwater is the place to seek them as they do grow much bigger in the confines of a stillwater. And by stillwaters I don’t mean commercials, I’m referring to lakes and gravel pits. These generally being found on the floodplains of rivers where the floods have exchanged fish stocks from one to the other, or have been purposely stocked in them where they are not on the floodplain.
    More years than I care to remember now there was a gravel pit on the Trent called Winthorpe Lake just outside the village of Holme that contained some huge, to us as teenager match anglers, chub. Far bigger than anything we’d seen caught in the Trent at that time, and in reality they would have been fish of 5+lb. If the match fishing on the river was slow to nonexistent we’d nip across the field and have a go to see whether we could catch one of these leviathans that swam about in the crystal clear water of the lake. We never did, they were so cute and adept at picking ever free offering off and leaving the hookbait alone it was unreal.

    An observation the late great Peter Stone made in his book on Big Chub in his quest to take a fish over 7 lb (7. 04) from the Oxford pits he fished at the time for them. Much of Peter’s success with big chub, including his PB, came on deadbaits in those pits. Something we never thought about or ever used on the dabbles on Winthorpe Lake. If only Peter had wrote that book 10 years before he did, we might just have nailed one of those infuriating fish we saw taking all the free offerings.

    What is truism regarding big chub in totally enclosed waters as above is they grow very big indeed, but rarely have a continuity of stock, dying out when they reach old age, to be no more, unless a new stocking is put in.

  6. #6
    binka Guest

    Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    Quote Originally Posted by The bad one View Post
    More years than I care to remember now there was a gravel pit on the Trent called Winthorpe Lake just outside the village of Holme that contained some huge, to us as teenager match anglers, chub.
    It's still very typical of many of the Trent valley gravel pits Phil and I'm sure many other rivers where they sit in the floodplain, Winthorpe being practically down the road from Walter Bower's lakes which were also stuffed with big chub especially the middle lake.

    Hoveringham was also very prolific if you could find 'em in the vast acreage of water.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    4,536
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    I'm sure it is Bink, but does anybody fish for them these days in this carp obsessed world?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    location location
    Posts
    363

    Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    I guess it doesn't help when experts predict that the next record Chub will come from a still water, that is just the kind of arguement needed to justify their presence, but regarding Barbel I think its a backward step for that fish, I've seen them come out of canals and some smaller brooks but the enviroment to be found does give for a better use of their best natural features.

    I say its not good for Barbel to remain in still water any longer than is neccessary, say to keep them there strictly for EA type farming exercises/stocking (Furnacemill etc) and to be put in Rivers where they have proven to self sustain a population previously, that is one thing, but they are naturally designed for faster water so why are they not raised in rivers from the off anyway?
    Last edited by wes79; 28-07-2015 at 13:55.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    south yorkshire
    Posts
    6,435
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    A small band of anglers used to fish Bowers in the late eighties for chub which were put there by old Walter and a few other anglers.It was simple link ledgering with small strips of seafish- usually mackeral that was the chosen method.
    They reached fair old weights, far bigger than than the ones in the river or so it seemed, the best one to my knowledge was a 6-2 fish taken from the middle lake.
    Its now a pit surrounded by a modern housing estate and fishing is prohibited.
    Phil, Winthorpe always had an outlet to the river that allowed fish of all kinds free access and egress except in low water conditions, much the same as Binghams near Winthorpe rack which maybe suggests that those big chub were also presant in the river at the same time but being much bigger and wary it would maybe have taken fishing "outside the box" similar to the way they were fished for at Bowers or as Stoney wrote of?.
    Last edited by flightliner; 29-07-2015 at 07:35.

  10. Default Re: Not something to brag about...

    I dont see the problem.
    Chub have been in still waters for years. Maybe not stocked, but from flooded rivers.
    The fact they grow to huge sizes must show that they are happy in still waters.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •