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Thread: Fighting Butt

  1. #1

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    Hello all, can anyone tell me what a fighting butt is used for and would one help me on a small stillwater?

  2. #2
    Shrek Guest

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    A fighting butt is a small extension (approx 2 to 3 inches) to the rod handle, sometimes removable.

    They help as they can provide extra support for the rod while the handle extension lies along your arm, or, if you have the "biggest fish you've ever caught in your entire life" on the end of the line, you can more comfortably rest the rod butt in your stomach.

    Personally I find they take a bit of getting used to as they I had to alter my casting style slightly to accommodate it.

    Hope that helps.

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks Adrian, I knew what one looked like from magazines but these didn`t tell me it`s function, and if you ask at an anglers shop they will usually try to sell you one saying they are essential.

  4. #4
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    "Fighting Butt" extensions are only really necessary if you are faced with fairly large trout and other species of fish which fight very hard. Eg: Pike and saltwater species. If you only fish streams where the biggest fish is just over the pound, they are hardly necessary and only add weight to what you are holding in your hand.

    Most fly rods over 6 weight normally have the butt piece extended these days.

    The detachable fighting butt became popular with the idiotic notion some years ago that the reel had to be located at the extremity of the rod handle. Thank goodness that anachronistic concept has been dumped in the bin years ago.

    I am interested in your comment Adrian that you had to alter your casting style to accomodate a fighting butt.

    How?

  5. #5
    Shrek Guest

    Default

    I tend to have a bit of a wristy action with my casting and found that the fighting butt was stopping my wrist from breaking on the forward cast.

    I know it's not meant to, but I prefer to do it that way.

    It meant that I had to keep a straight wrist when I was casting with it, not something I coped well with, that's all.

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