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  1. #1

    Default

    Hi all,

    Would any of you know if these chemicals would work for a salmon fishing? SODIUM SULFITE, SODIUM METABISULFITE, SODIUM NITRITE, SALT HG IODIZED, SODA ASH DENSE, METSO 20, Sodium Percarbonate, Ascorbic Acid, food grade color dye, amino acids, some kind of powder like shrimp, tuna, krill, ect. and wondered how much of these ingredients you would need to use to make a good Salmon egg bait cure?
    What else would work salmon like? Any ideas guy's? Anyone got any good combinations or recipies?
    cheers

  2. #2

    Default

    Salmon egg bait ! Isn't that an illegal method in england?

  3. #3

    Default

    I am located in the United States.

  4. #4
    Colin North, the one and only Guest

    Default

    I didn't realise that Pacific Salmon fed after re-entry to fresh water. It is generally understood that Atlantic Salmon do not. I assume that since your nick suggests Northwest that you are talking about Pacific Salmon.

    I've seen on the Discovery Channel some of the flies used for Pacific species, and they do resemble eggs.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Sheffield
    Posts
    4,542

    Default

    Flying condoms catch more Salmon in this country than everything else put together.


    Google them.


    Best of luck!
    PaSC

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Barnet, S.Herts/N. London
    Posts
    4,236

    Default

    Most of those ingredients are rather nasty preservatives. Soduim sulphite and metabisulphite produce sulphuric acid in certain conditions - which kills bugs, but doesnt taste nice.

    If you just want to make packs of enough bait for a day's fishing, I would experiment with a combination of dehydration and freezing.

    If you want shelf-life bait to leave in the car, you're probably better off buying it from the commercial producers - they must be getting something right, or they'd go bust!

    My first thought would be to go down the Gravlax route, drying the eggs in a mixture of sugar and salt foor a few days, storing (drained and bagged into 1-day batches)in the freezer, then (perhaps) rehydrating.

    If that doesn't work, abandon the cook's way and try the histologist's - try dehydrating by transferring the eggs to progressively stronger brine solutions - 50, 70, 90 and 100% saturated brine for a couple of hours each.

    Still no joy? try alcohol (50, 70, 90 and 100% Polish Pure Spirit), and if THAT doesn't do it, accept defeat and buy the commercial stuff!

    Note to self: try these with Elderberries this autumn!

  7. #7

    Default

    Most peope here in Canada use Borax, Sodium borate.

    cheers,

    Paul.

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