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  1. #1
    Paul Coxon Guest

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    Hi! I'm new to fly fishingbutwant to invest in a fly fishing outfit that I will not outgrow and would be grateful for some advice. I also want my kit to be as general purpose as possible. I intend to fish in a local lake, but wouldlike to use the same kit for reservoirs and (occasionally) larger rivers if possible. I realise that this is a tall order!!!

    I have done some research andhave found adeal that includes a Greyflex M2 9.5' rod, grxi reel with 3 xtra spools and 3 Snowbee's lines. All this seem good stuff. I'm not sure, however, whether to go for a#6/7 rod with #6 lines or a #7/8 rod with #7 lines.

    Which would be best? Are there any better alternatives in the same (£240) price bracket?

  2. #2
    Colin North, the one and only Guest

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    Sounds like a goodall round kit. I would plump for the 6/7 weight rod and 6 or 7 weight lines. You will probably find that the rodrating is a bit understated, and even a 6/7 weight will comfortably cast an 8 weight line. Therefor I would select the 7 weight lines.You may find using a lighter line much nicer and certainly, in my view, when using a floating line, bite indication will be more positive, since there will be less resistance for a fish to feel, and reject the fly.

    I can't think of an alernative to the price bracket you suggest, if you want good quality that will last. You could buy, for example,the Shakespeare starter kit for about £40, which only has one line with it, but you must know the old saying "you get what you pay for" and Ibelieve you would soon be thinking that an alternative decision might have been wiser than the cheaper kits.

    I hope you get sorted soon.

  3. #3
    Paul Coxon Guest

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    Thanks Colin. I phoned Greys this morning and the chapI spoke tosaid he would go for a 6/7 rod with a WF7 line, the 7/8 being a lot stiffer. He also said the two rod ratings (6/7) were double tapered and WF respectively,so a 6/7 rod would handle a WF7 line well.

    I alsoasked about the difference between the GRXi & M2. He said the action of the rods was similar and the main difference was the finish. What do people think?

    A spanner in the works is that I have just read a review of the M2 6/7 that suggests it doesn't handle WF7 SINKING lines so well. Has anyone any comments?

    Another spanner inthe worksarethe comments from a local fly club. They were very helpful and even offered free casting lessons, but suggested I don't spend more than£40 on a rod to start off with. Like youColin, I feel I will only end upbuying the more expensive outfit before long & end up witha cheap kit I don't want.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    A 9-footer will suffice for beginners. Buy around the £70-£200 range, there are many good kits in that area. A good kit for beginners is here. It gives a nice rod and reel, along with lines, and backing.

  5. #5
    Colin North, the one and only Guest

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    Generally speaking, I use DT lines, particularly floating lines, because trying to pick up a long WF from the water to re-cast to a fish that I may see on my right or left, or elsewhere in front of me, can be very difficullt, whereas with a double taper, I can roll the line of the water and re-cast in one or perhaps two movements.

  6. #6
    Paul Coxon Guest

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    After days of agonizing, I've finally ordered my kit

    Greyflex M2 6/7 with a 7/8 GRXi reel & #WF7 Snowbee lines.

    Many thanks for all the advice by way of this forum and also those who emailed me!

    (will bear the DT lines in mind for a spare spool in future).

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Sounds like a good kit! Have fun when you go fly fishing!!

  8. #8
    Sean Meeghan Guest

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    Hope you get on with the kit Paul. The reason that a rod struggles to handle a sinking line at its rated weight is that a sinking line is thinner, has less air resistanceand so loads the rod more easily. Its therefore possible to overload the rod on the cast if it is towards the bottom ofit rating.

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