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  1. #1
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    The other day I was on my local reservoir and a friend of mine was catching trout with alacrity whilst myself and all the others on the water were struggling.

    As I know the guy, I decided to watch him closely to see if he was doing anything differently to ourselves.

    He was fishing small buzzer patterns as most of use were, and other than using a fairly short leader his tactics seemed similar to the ones I was using.

    Then I spotted it - his line was dark brown, almost turd colour. And yes he had dyed his line on the recommendation that was in a book he had just read - "The Trout and the Fly" by Goddard and Clarke.

    But I should have known better! Hadn't I, for many years, used dark coloured floating fly lines on the recommendation of none other than Dick Walker.

    The trouble is I had become lazy and had caught loads of fish in spite of using brightly coloured line. What I did not consider was the numbers of fish I didn'tcatch.

    But have you had a similar experience? What do you think is the right colour for floating fly lines?

  2. #2

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    Many people believe that the colour of the line is irrelevant, as they all look the same from under the water.

    I think it comes down to personal preferance. I've got 2 floating lines. One isbright yellow, I've used it for 4 years now. The other is ivory. I much prefer the ivory, because it can spot takes easier on it ondark stretches of river, no other reason.

  3. #3
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    Of course they all look the same when viewed from beneith the water in the fish's window. But outside the windowa light coloured line will stand out against the dark background of the bottom. The photos of what happens are in Goddard and Clarke's book.

    Both John Goddard, Brian Clarke and Dick Walker believed that light coloured linesunder certain conditions scared fish and when practical evidencepresents itself, I have a tendency to believethis.

    But we shall see.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cheshire
    Posts
    5,755

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    <blockquote class=quoteheader>Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) wrote (see)</blockquote><blockquote class=quote>

    Dick Walker believed that light coloured linesunder certain conditions scared fish and when practical evidencepresents itself, I have a tendency to believethis.

    But we shall see.</blockquote><blockquote class=quoteheader></blockquote>


    Hell Ron, your Sharkskin line takes some beating for colour.

    Bright fluorescent green, YUK,

    Give you a &pound;5er for it[img]/forum/smilies/nerd_smiley.gif[/img]
    Perch and tench record holder, and ACA member for twenty years, and Treasurer of P.A.S.C.

  5. #5
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    Don't be cheeky Atrax robustus!

    I rate Michael Evans Arrowhead as a better line than the Sharkskin.

    I burned my finger on the Sharkskin the other day. Hooked into a fish that decided to open the throttle.

    You can have it for &pound;60.00 plus SD.

  6. #6
    Cakey Guest

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    &quot;Hooked into a fish that decided to open the throttle&quot;................I love that,can I use it please Ron ?

  7. #7
    Cakey Guest

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    atrax robustus my bum,more like Thomisidae

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Not So Greater Manchester
    Posts
    2,891

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    So why do manufactures colour their lines white, ivory and flourescent green, yellow and orange?

    If dark lines catch more fish, surely they would sell more of their lines if coloured dark, ie dark olive, brown and grey.

    Does this go back to when all dry lines were light in colour and wet lines were dark?

  9. #9
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    Many fly line manufacturers now offer floating lines in two options - bright colours or neutral grey, Some even camouflage the line to make it look like a bit of weed or detritus.

    It has become the norm for anglers to buy brightly coloured floating lines because we are told that you will see atake better with the bright line.

    Personally I think that this business of floating line colour was never resolved. I wouldn't be at all surprised to find out that dark coloured floating linesscare fewer fish and help catch more fish. It's the same with the finish on rods, a matt finish is certainly better, but those manufacturers of rods who put on a matt finish are up against Joe Soap who won't buy a rod unless it acts as a heliograph and scares all the fish for miles.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Not So Greater Manchester
    Posts
    2,891

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    I feel the same about fly reel Ron. All nice and shiney.

    Some rod manufactures still insist on that silver crome top eye.

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