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  1. #1
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    My local reservoir has a good population of brown trout, some of which are very big indeed. PersonallyI would not be surprised to see one taken during November of over 10 lbs.

    Brown trout in large still waters behave quite differently to the more commonly stocked rainbow trout. As they grow larger, they become more inclined to a diet of fish. In fact a decent sized brown can have large sharp teeth which can give you a nasty stab when unhooking them.

    Brown trout are also very territorial. They tend to find themselves a bolt hole and from there will ambush prey as they swim past, much like a pike in a way; although I think brownies are far more aggresive than pike.

    So how do we target them?

    If boat fishing were allowed on our reservoir, I would be out with a fast sinking or even a lead cored line, coupled with fish imitating flies such as zonkers, appetizers or minkies. The doyen of big brown trout in reservoirs was Fred Wagstaffe. He created such patterns as the "Waggie", a large "fly" with a double hook and a flexible plastic wiggle tail. On Rutland Water in its halcyon days, Fred caught many big browns from his drifting boat. He located underwater structure such as flooded buildings - trout bolt holes of course.

    But I shall target my brownies by using a clear slow sinkingline with various fish imitating flies, and some big damsel and dragon fly nymph imitations. With the slow sinking line I can count down to the taking depth. I did this yesterdayand hooked a whopping great brown on a size 8 Cormorant that got off!!!!

    It must have been 6 lbs or so. I caused me to sit for a while to get my composure back. My heart was going likethe clappers. Hooking big browns is one of the most exciting experiences in fly fishing.

  2. #2
    Colin North, the one and only Guest

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    I was talking to a guy on Saturday night at a party. He caught an 11lb plus Brownie, on a dead bait!

  3. #3
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    There is no doubt that brown trout can be caught on dead baits; live baits tooif you like. In my ressie that method is not allowed.

    But who in heavens name wants to catch trout on dead baits?

  4. #4

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    <blockquote class=quoteheader>Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) wrote (see)</blockquote><blockquote class=quote>

    There is no doubt that brown trout can be caught on dead baits; live baits tooif you like. In my ressie that method is not allowed.

    But who in heavens name wants to catch trout on dead baits?</blockquote>

    Or in a flooded building!!

    There are no flooded buildings in Rutland, everything was demolised!

    You could of course try a Deer hair floating fry pattern on a short leader fished on a fast sinking line and twitch it booby style across the bottom if it's not to weedy.

    I would say it's very difficult to target brownies on a mixed fishery.

  5. #5

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    Target Brownies by fishing a river Ron. Natural fish, not bloated stockies!!

  6. #6

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    Hi Ric,

    I trust you have never fished Grafham or Rutland and caught a brown trout from them??

    If you had you wouldn't have made that statement.

    They might well be stocked but they grow into lean mean fighting machines after a few months in the named waters.

    I still prefer a big rainbow, aliens or not[img]/forum/smilies/big_smile_smiley.gif[/img][img]/forum/smilies/big_smile_smiley.gif[/img]

  7. #7
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    Thrybergh's brownies are wonderful fish. Many are stocked at about 10 inches and in a few years grow out to 4 or 5 lbs. They are powerful, fully finned and deep shouldered.

    I once hooked a huge brown on the South Arm of Rutland Water in 1987. I must have played it for 15 minutes. My boat partner saw it, and so did some friends in another boat as it surfaced close to them.

    It was bright silver with spots like little swastikas. How big was it?

    Certainly 10 lbs, probably over 15. A fish that all dreams are made of.

    It got off of course and the 10 longshank hook was nearly straightened out.

    No wonder the great Fred Wagstaffe loved the big ressie brownies.

    Big grown on rainbows from reservoirs are also wonderful fish. There isn't much in British freshwater that can beat them for fight, perhaps mullet, but I don't classmullet as 100% freshwater fish.

  8. #8
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    Oh by the way Colin, someone told me that there was a few farmhouses and a church that was flooded at Rutland.

    And booby style is banned on my water.

  9. #9

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    <blockquote class=quoteheader>Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) wrote (see)</blockquote><blockquote class=quote>

    Oh by the way Colin, someone told me that there was a few farmhouses and a church that was flooded at Rutland.

    And booby style is banned on my water.</blockquote>

    Someone told you &quot;porkies&quot; [img]/forum/smilies/surprised_smiley.gif[/img]

    Normanton Church is partly submerged but is surrounded by a rock barrier.

    Even stone walls were knocked down before the valleys were flooded, the same as happened at Grafham.

    If you can't fish Booby style use the fry on the surface, you'll just have to wade through all the rainbows to catch a brownie.

  10. #10
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    I've had two browns this autumn amongst a load of rainbows. Don't get me wrong I'm not knocking the rainbows, but any tips to target the browns will be worth considering.

    Normally I fish deep for the browns at this time of year with a fry imitating fly. I wonder if I could get away with Steve Parton's Rassler fished booby style. I have 6 weeks of season left, and I'm looking forward to it.

    I have 15 days left on my season ticket.

    By the way there is a village and an old church buried beneith Ladybower reservoir in Derbyshire Colin. Such a pity that prime structure had to be destroyed prior to Rutland and Grafham getting flooded. As you know, browns love a bit of structure.

    Brown trout can live up to 25 years I am told. I wonder what's lurking in the depths of some of our reservoirs?

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