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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
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    Peterborough
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    Default Whatever became of Ray Mumford?

    In the 1970s and 1980s, Ray set the standard for pole fishing. Nobody knew more about the subject than Ray - he was a fine angler.

    Is Ray still with us?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    East Yorkshire
    Posts
    9,979

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    I believe Ray was severely beaten up by a group of idiots, after this, (and I do hope i'm wrong), he was left partially disabled and with extreme memory loss and unable to continue fishing.

    A tragic story.
    Some people are so poor, that all they have is money

  3. #3

    Default

    Afraid your right Merv - He is in a care home I believe..I think Woody has told us about it in the past
    He is every other inch a gentleman.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
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    Subtropical Buckinghamshire
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    Default

    Yep, that's all I know.

    Funnily enough, I was thinking about him just the other day.
    "I care not what others think of what I do, but I care very much about what I think of what I do! That is character!" - Theodore Roosevelt

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cheshire.
    Posts
    204

    Default

    That's awful.

    I've still got a set of Ray Mumford pole floats that I won in a junior match some time in the late 1970's. And Ray was the inspiration for me to get a pole, a 5.4m fibreglass baby with what was known as a 'flick tip' (a stumpy quivertip with an eye whipped on) later I added a 'crook top' (that's a method of attaching an external elastic, kids). I too, recently wondered what had happened to him.

    I feel really sad.
    Last edited by m a brooks; 13-11-2010 at 11:48.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    East Yorkshire
    Posts
    9,979

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    Bl##dy h#ll, only from the other day and never saw it..........

    Blast from the past
    Some people are so poor, that all they have is money

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Stuck on the chuffin M25 somewhere between Heathrow and the A3
    Posts
    11,495

    Default

    That's sad...I didn't know. Ray was always something of an expert on small fish...I recall him winning something [Div 1 National ?] with a net of about a million bleak off [I think] the Trent ?

    To this day me & my mate Phil always refer to a small roach as "a mumford".

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Azide the Stour
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    3,922

    Default

    He won the Gladding Masters on the Nene with 14lb of bleak.

    He also won an open match on one of my local lakes with 920 roach in 5 hours which must be one of the highest scores of roach in the time.

    He was a highly skilled and versatile angler who caught his share of big fish in the 60s from diverse venues as the London Reservoirs and the Royalty.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    East Yorkshire
    Posts
    9,979

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    Mark, do you remember the Gladding Masters on the Trent at Walter Bowers stretch at North Muskham, (70s ???), Ray Mumford and Kevin Ashurst having a side bet of £100, (a fair bit of money), who'd finish higher, if I remember rightly Ashurst won the bet but I can't remember who won the title.

    I do remember Tom Pickering 'whipping' bleak out like there was no tomorrow.
    Some people are so poor, that all they have is money

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Azide the Stour
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    Default

    Pete Palmer won the Trent one with just over 7lb. I was there and it was the first time that I ever saw the top anglers in action including Billy Lane, Marks, Ashurst etc.. I realised that day that waggler fishing was all about letting go and attacking the river. Fantastic memories.

    I remember the force 10 gale because going up we did 80mph but only 60mph returning - it was a southerly and we were in a Mini Clubman!

    Then there was the Bower demo of the needle floats at which a host of Trent stick float aces pointed to the river and asked why if they were so good so few were in use, like none, and the scaffolding blowing down breaking someone's leg, Norman Worth?

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