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  1. #1

    Default Spliced in Quiver tip

    Is there any advantage to having a spliced in quiver tip compared to push in tips?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    The advantage with push in tips is that you can change the tip.

    On a personal note, i like the spliced in tip, but with the rod's as they are now it's hard to tell if someone is using a spliced tip or not.

    I don't know of any advantage of a spliced in tip, other than you know it's not going to come out of the end section.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Thetford, Norfolk & Falklands
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    I can blank just as easy with either!

  4. #4
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    Stuck on the chuffin M25 somewhere between Heathrow and the A3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Daywalker Clarke View Post
    The advantage with push in tips is that you can change the tip.
    That's true Ray but how many times do you do this rather than just reach for your favourite one because experience tells you that its the best all round compromise ? That's exactly what I do despite carrying a variety of tips I nearly always use the same one...exception being when there is a bit of extra water on,then [and only then] do I go heavier.

    And I always fish a tip...never a straight top.Dunno why...I just do.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Durham City, Co Durham ... STILL The Land of The Prince Bishops
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    I use my Seer 1lb-06oz 'Rover' rod most of the time which has three push over tips and a push on tip ring fitted onto a carbon sleeve to make the rod a normal Avon type, just the same design as the early Graham Philips Avon/Barbel rods
    S-kippy is right though, 95% of the time I use the same tip.
    Last edited by john m h; 27-11-2010 at 21:48.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by john m h View Post
    S-kippy is right though, 95% of the time I use the same tip.
    Perhaps that's because 95% of the time the river is in a condition that suits that tip. Always handy having weaker and stronger ones though, just in case.
    "I care not what others think of what I do, but I care very much about what I think of what I do! That is character!" - Theodore Roosevelt

  7. #7
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    To be honest Jeff, the one tip is the only one that suites the rod/blank. The other two were a total waste of money.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Cloud Cuckoo Land
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    Quote Originally Posted by mol View Post
    Is there any advantage to having a spliced in quiver tip compared to push in tips?
    IMO no advantage at all, in fact all the advantages are with having a multiple choice of tip.
    As said by a few already, the majority of the time there is a tendancy to select the same tip but without having the option of changing, it would be impossible fish at maximum efficiency with only one tip.
    As if fishing only one river and your tip is perfect for normal level, it will be bent double if carrying extra water.
    And if using a perfect tip for flood water, it'll prove to stiff in normal conditions.

    Add then fishing on various rivers, I (normally) use a 1oz tip on the river Cherwell, 2oz on the Windrush and in deeper areas of the Thames a 4oz tip is required.

    Spliced tips are just to big a compromise too offer the most effective means of bite indication, I guess they can't fall out when casting, though this has never happened to me, yet....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Long Eaton, Derbyshire
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    I must admit that of all the tip rods I have, it does tend to be the case (in my opinion, of course) that one particular tip will suit the blank better than others. I have never felt that carbon and glass tips interchange well with a particular carrier section. Almost all my tip fishing takes place on the Trent, so I usually opt for a carbon tip. In heavy water conditions, I will use my Daiwa Porky Pig with the hollow tip section; for 'normal' conditions, I will use the heavy carbon push-in tip (about 4oz TC) on the Porky (I have an extra 'carrier' section) or 11/13. For lighter work, I have an old Tri Cast Trophy with a home made carbon push-over tip (home made because the glass ones provided didn't really suit the blank). Anyway, I digress...I think the answer would be to have say 3 carbon tips, made from an identical section of tapered carbon (chosen carefully to suit the blank), but cut at different lengths, say 26", 24" and 22" - so that the shorter the tip, the stiffer the action. The only 'problem' for some people would be the variation in length of the quivertips. As for glass tips, I simply don't need or use them; on a still water I'd rather use a swingtip for short/medium range (again, home made) - far more sensitive! If going a long chuck on a lake, I would use a carbon tip and tighten up as much as I could, and look for big drop-backs.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hampshire
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    I prefer a spliced in tip every time. As others have said, only one tip will ever really suit the blank (in some cases none of them do!) so if it's real efficiency you're after, you should carry three or four rods with different blanks, each suited to a different strength of quivertip. If that sounds absurd, I'm not surprised; it is!

    There's always a compromise somewhere along the line, unless we create a water of even depth everywhere, holding just one species of fish, each of identical weight, fighting abilities and feeding habits.

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