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  1. #1
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    Question Understanding what is right for you

    I have often thought to myself, whether or not I am using the right rods for the fishing I am doing. I'm comfortable with the Rods I have, but, could I have bought better?

    How do you decide which rods to buy for the situations you mostly find yourselves in?

    With Test Curve Rods, does the test curve dictate the distance that rod can cast or how heavy the line is that you can use or do you just buy a rod that could suit all the situations you may find yourself fishing in?

    What should we be looking for in a rod and do the manufacturers truly provide us with what we need or just what sells?

  2. Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    Quote Originally Posted by steph mckenzie View Post
    With Test Curve Rods, does the test curve dictate the distance that rod can cast or how heavy the line is that you can use or do you just buy a rod that could suit all the situations you may find yourself fishing in?
    It's more complex, the TC gives an idea of the size of lead and poundage of line that can be used. Roughly speaking x5 idea line strength, x4 mini and x6 max. As far as ideal casting weight goes for every lb you can use an oz. Having said that carbon rods are a hint more flexible.

    The action of the rod has alot of influence if not more influence on casting. Fast actioned rods cast further than parabolic action which in turn cast further than a through action rod. All thinks being equal I could probably cast a 2.5lb fast actioned rod further than a 3lb through action rod. Presuming you can compress the rod, a 3.5lb fast action rod with a suitable lead will cast further than the same rod in a lower TC.

    Quote Originally Posted by steph mckenzie View Post
    What should we be looking for in a rod and do the manufacturers truly provide us with what we need or just what sells?
    Being supply and demand the manufacturers supply what the most want but perhaps not what I'm looking for.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    The modern trend of using 2.7lb to 3.5lb rods and big pit reels for Carp; on smallish waters seems totally foreign to me but you see it all the time nowerdays.

    Especially when we used to catch 20's and 30's on 1lb tc rods and a 2lb tc rod was considered a long range rod back in the 70's/80's LOL...

    Both Yates and Walker caught their 51lb & 44lb records on short 1.5lb-ish (max) split cane rods.

    I love catching decent sized Carp on lighter 1.5lb to 2lb test curve rods with a more forgiving through action, and unless I was chucking a heavy lead to the horizon I wouldn't dream of using 3lb tc rods and big pit reels like I see a lot of anglers using on smaller waters today.

    Keith
    Last edited by Keith M; 08-05-2013 at 09:10.
    Happiness is fish shaped (It used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    Quote Originally Posted by steph mckenzie View Post
    I have often thought to myself, whether or not I am using the right rods for the fishing I am doing. I'm comfortable with the Rods I have, but, could I have bought better?
    Only you can decide if the rods you have are right for you and the fishing you do. I find that not giving a shiny **** what other people think goes a long way towards giving you peace of mind in that respect.
    As to whether you could have bought better, most probably, it's the very thought that drives our never ending consumer economy. The trick is to learn to be happy with what you've got or be prepared to either buy the very best you can find at the outset or go for the never ending upgrade route.

    Quote Originally Posted by steph mckenzie View Post
    How do you decide which rods to buy for the situations you mostly find yourselves in?
    Stupid amounts of time researching through catalogues, websites and tackle shops combined with a good dollop of experience. I know I have my own preferences and I know others are different. Minor differences in something as daft as the length and thickness of a cork handle can change the way a rod feels entirely. I know I can't abide a thick handle on a rod, it would render the best blank in the world unusable for me. Someone else could be quite the opposite.

    Quote Originally Posted by steph mckenzie View Post
    With Test Curve Rods, does the test curve dictate the distance that rod can cast or how heavy the line is that you can use or do you just buy a rod that could suit all the situations you may find yourself fishing in?
    People get far too hung up on test curves. They give some idea of the suitable line ratings and the casting weight they may be capable of chucking, but that's not the full story. Achievable distance has more to do with the individual concerned and the action of the rod. TC ratings give no clue as to the action of the rod and not all 2.75lb rods are equal.

    Quote Originally Posted by steph mckenzie View Post
    What should we be looking for in a rod and do the manufacturers truly provide us with what we need or just what sells?
    Look for something that fits your preferences and your types of fishing. Most manufacturers are only ever going to provide what sells, they won't stay in business long if they don't. However, you can find the most obscure and specific rod if you look hard enough. Failing that, you've always got the custom option. Four different types of rod that I want are barely covered by the majority of manufacturers these days, proper stick float rods, light carp rods (2-2.5lbTC), genuinely powerful real float rods at 13' (not poxy Avons) and short (10' ish) tip action small river/beck trotting rods. There's good reason for that though, apart from me, they'd barely sell them.

    ---------- Post added at 12:39 ---------- Previous post was at 12:24 ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith M View Post
    The modern trend of using 2.7lb to 3.5lb rods and big pit reels for Carp; on smallish waters seems totally foreign to me but you see it all the time nowerdays.
    You can only presume that some can only justify one set of rods/reels and not multiple set ups for different waters. That theory falls down a bit when it comes to those that never fish anything other than small waters with such gear. I'd guess that such folks are unduly influenced by the various media sources without actually thinking about what they are buying and why.

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith M View Post
    Especially when we used to catch 20's and 30's on 1lb tc rods and a 2lb tc rod was considered a long range rod back in the 80's. LOL...

    Both Yates and Walker caught their 51lb & 44lb records on short 1.5lb (ish) split cane rods
    They did indeed, but this way of thinking is part of the whole TC red herring.
    I well recall that my first proper carp rod was 1.5lb. I then got what I considered an absolute monster of a rod at 1.75lb. However, if I ever used a lead greater than 1oz, I'd be surprised. I don't suppose Yates or Walker were ever going to try and chuck 3oz leads, with PVA bags, to the horizon. I'm not the biggest fan of such fishing myself, but do accept that high TC rods have little to do with the size of the fish being fished for and everything to do with the methods employed.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    Quote Originally Posted by stillwater blue View Post
    ...parabolic action.
    This is something that I hear and read a lot, what do you mean by it?

    'Tip action', 'through action' and 'progressive action', I feel are self explanatory, but if you look at a parabolic curve it doesn't describe the curve of a fishing rod.

    Take a look at a Parabolic Curve

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    Quote Originally Posted by bottle rocket View Post
    This is something that I hear and read a lot, what do you mean by it?

    'Tip action', 'through action' and 'progressive action', I feel are self explanatory, but if you look at a parabolic curve it doesn't describe the curve of a fishing rod.

    Take a look at a Parabolic Curve
    I've always taken it as marketing speak. However, I'll take Dr Harrison's meaning of somewhere in between tip and through actioned as a starting point. He also gives a good explanation of the whole test curve nonsense.

    Last edited by sam vimes; 07-05-2013 at 11:58.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    Quote Originally Posted by sam vimes View Post
    I've always taken it as marketing speak. However, I'll take Dr Harrison's meaning of somewhere in between tip and through actioned as a starting point. He also gives a good explanation of the whole test curve nonsense.

    Yes, you see I can go with that or the (if you remember) old Shakespeare rating system.

  8. Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    Quote Originally Posted by bottle rocket View Post
    'Tip action', 'through action' and 'progressive action', I feel are self explanatory, but if you look at a parabolic curve it doesn't describe the curve of a fishing rod.

    Take a look at a Parabolic Curve
    Cut it in half and it does.

    In all fairness it's probably, as already said, just a marketing term as it does sound more impressive than medium action and men do appear to like jargon.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    Isnt parabolic a next step from compound tapers, one of my rods is a powercurve which functions parabolicly ish. Ring friction seems to be the problem with parabolic curves as the angle of the line through the rings seems to increase dramatically as the rod bends.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Understanding what is right for you

    Quote Originally Posted by aebitim View Post
    Isnt parabolic a next step from compound tapers, one of my rods is a powercurve which functions parabolicly ish. Ring friction seems to be the problem with parabolic curves as the angle of the line through the rings seems to increase dramatically as the rod bends.
    Dunno, if you look at the diagram posted by Sam, non of those described look parabolic to me or even 'half parabolic' for that matter. It just seems like a phrase that's used to describe something, inaccurately. The last person that I heard say it was Alan Scothorne he was playing a Carp and saying how the rod was bending with a parabolic curve except it wasn't and the co-commentator agreed with him.

    Stillwater Blue - Sorry for starting off on it. It reads like I'm desperate for accuracy - I can assure you that I'm not, I was just wondering about the use of the term.

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