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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
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    3,251

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    Haven't they seen Jurassic park ?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Berkshire
    Posts
    1,317

    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    Very interesting Chris, thanks for that. Japanese Knotweed next? We can only hope
    By the time a man realizes his Father was right, he has a son who thinks he's wrong.

  4. #4
    binka Guest

    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    I was battering my way through a load of this stuff a few weeks ago and stumbled upon a Giant Hogweed and purely by chance I happened to realise what it was before it was too late...

    I chose another swim!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bradford, West Yorkshire
    Posts
    3,251

    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    I can (at a push) live with... dropped trousers over native nettles, blisters from hog weed, insect bites, battle my way through balsam, fall in and hope to be rescued by a passing lady dog walker, potential blindness from watching dragon fly porn, (risk one eye) but NOT blindness from Giant hog weed in the eye... thats real nasty stuff Steve!

    Apparently Hogweed's been around since the 19th century, Knotweed a good while longer... Doctor Knotweed - The UK japanese knotweed removal experts

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Leeds
    Posts
    643

    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    Interesting to read the extract from the Guardian, lets hope the solution will work. Balsam's an attractive plant in moderate amounts, nowadays it chokes river banks and footpaths where I fish.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    If it came to a choice between HB and nettles (both are monocultures) I would prefer to fish among HB every time.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Wessex
    Posts
    2,175

    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    This is an excellent example how anglers and the general public help our waterways by bankside workparties or through financial donations.

    New Forest Non-Native Plants Project | Hampshire & Isle of Wight Wildlife Trust


    Please note that this project was pioneered by a County Wildlife Trust, not an angling group, and has been running for over three years.

    .
    Last edited by mick b; 21-08-2014 at 08:05.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    On another planet
    Posts
    2,982

    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    Only the other day whilst walking alongside an unfishable brook did i think that there's surely something that could be introduced or even engineered to tackle this plant. Playing god is dangerous and the outcomes could be unpredictable i know but HB is far worse than nettles for the long term habitat and structure of the river.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Tackling Himalayan balsam

    Quote Originally Posted by theartist View Post
    Only the other day whilst walking alongside an unfishable brook did i think that there's surely something that could be introduced or even engineered to tackle this plant. Playing god is dangerous and the outcomes could be unpredictable i know but HB is far worse than nettles for the long term habitat and structure of the river.

    My previous comment was a bit tongue in cheek, the reason nettles are preferable to Balsam is because of the root structure. Balsam is very shallow rooted and where it is prevalent the banks will erode during floods. Whereas nettles have a strong matted root structure which tends to support the banks.
    There is allot of ignorance about this species, I know of a stretch of the Teme which is controlled by a small syndicate where the resident guide, who lived in a caravan on the fishery through the summer and who was a regular guest speaker at the barbel societies evening meetings, was proud of the fact that he was responsible for spreading Balsam throughout the length of his fishery and made it a feature of his talks.
    I was a regional organiser for the BS at the time and even though I was aware of the ecological problems associated with a foreign monoculture I never picked him up on it through fear of ridicule. Funny how we can sometimes get swept up with other peoples misconceptions.

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