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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    shefield, south yorkshire
    Posts
    3,669

    Default It started with a float.

    Generally speaking that is. I don't think it would be far off the mark to suggest that most will have started their fishing employing the float. Nothing new there of course, where applicable they are efficient, and dare I say ''a joy to watch''. And it has been that way for over two hundred years.
    Then along came the bite indicators, utilizing various attachments to rod and line. Sometime before the second world war dough bobbins hung from the rod tip, as well as those that employed attachment to the butt of the rod via a Terry clip and silicone tube that registered bite indication by a lift basically. All those type of indicators were developed in order to attain greater distances whilst fishing, and that they certainly did.
    We then come to what could be called the electronic age, due in part to a fella named ''Richard Walker'' who after several proto types came out with what could be termed the first commercially produced electronic alarm the ''Heron'' That initial introduction has been refined and developed, resulting in some of the most effective and expensive bite registration methods.
    And still the float marches on, surely a testimony when a bit of quill, cork etc can stand it's ground in such illustrious company.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    On another planet
    Posts
    2,705

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    It started with a float and it will end with a float as far as I'm concerned

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    In God's County: Wiltshire
    Posts
    22,351
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    Like many of my peers my fishing began with the float and so began a love affair that has lasted many decades.

    Back in the 50's and 60's it was mainly large quills and cork bodied floats that these days might be considered to be ill-designed for the purpose.

    I well remember some of the first more purpose designed floats when they came onto the market and one innovation being the sliding body float (called Mandy?) that became my favourite for ages. In fact, I mentioned this to a long time contributor on here a few years ago and few days later little package arrived at my house with 2 of those lovely old floats.

    To my mind I hope that a session on the float will be the last one I experience and if so then I'll pass on a happy man.

    Scholars have long known that fishing eventually turns men into philosophers.

    Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to buy decent tackle on a philosopher's salary. ~

    Patrick F. McManus






  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    3,433
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    The float will always be miles ahead of the feeder or leger for me when fishing within float casting distances and when the depth isn't going to be too much of a problem.

    I will only move over to a bottom lead or feeder when the situation demands it and the float is clearly going to be out of the question.

    There are exceptions like when I'm rolling a bait downstream after beards and touch legering using light leads, but for me float fishing in its many different forms is always going to be my favourite method.

    Keith
    Last edited by Keith M; 01-04-2017 at 09:41.
    Happiness is fish shaped (It used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

  5. #5

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    It all started for me using a large coffin lead and reeling in my first ever fish, a 1lb+ flounder. That was above the tidal limit on the Dorset Stour (now Throop Beat 3) back in the late 1950's.

    I then progressed quite quickly to using floats and by the mid 1960's I was trotting with a centrepin and fishing the waggler working my way through the range of ABU 500 series reels.

    In those early days and into the 1970's I used swingtips, donkey tops and quiver tips but had pretty much gravitated to all forms of float fishing with trotting various top & bottom floats my much preferred favourite. I had a huge collection of floats in many hand made float boxes all neatly laid out in nice rows of foam. Biggest question was always which boxes I should take to the river bank for any session.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    leafy cheshire
    Posts
    11,197

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    Likewise! After a 40 odd year absence I have a lot to catch up on and whilst I still love the float and the child like thrill I still get when it begins to move and slip below the surface, I do like tip fishing . I am slowly catching up on some techniques and tackle I missed out on! My attempts at swing tipping and using an Abu 501 are good examples .

    I do wish I had kept the floats I had as a boy. I did buy some but most were given to me and I remember them as being brightly coloured. I suspect that many were perch bobbers like the beauties Binka makes!

    I always wanted to fish the Great Ouse and to a child it conjured up images of a Zambezi type river teeming with fish! Probably best kept as an unfulfilled fantasy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Yorkshire.
    Posts
    10,591

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    It started with a coffin lead and a dead minnow threaded on a size 4 long shank hook for me. However, it wasn't long before that got fairly boring and I progressed to floats. It's always going to be a case of horses for courses, but I tend to choose times and courses where floats will be the right horse. I'm at the point now where the vast majority of my fishing will employ a float of some description. Leads and feeders might be more effective at times, but they just don't hold my interest the way a float does.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    South East England
    Posts
    3,879

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    Picture my old man, siting with a big red float on (he was blind as a bat) watching it go round and round in a eddy (he didn't like to do much in the way of exercise) smoking his pipe; just about the most content he ever was . Wouldn't be the same with a bite alarm would it, so yep, the float just about does it for me.
    I even stick one on in the sea whenever possible and even when its not possible.
    Last edited by markg; 01-04-2017 at 10:58.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Old Arley home of the Crows
    Posts
    7,607
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    Float, swing/quiver tip, electronic, watching the tip or touch legering along with numerous other ways of detecting a bite all have their day and all have different ways of mesmerising an angler. Whether its any of these methods its the bite that gets me going never knowing what or how big the fish responsible is.

    My first fish (a perch) was caught on a porcupine quill float and I still like doing a bit of float fishing although all my bigger fish have come to other methods of bite detection that could just be down to the waters I fished though requiring a none float approach.
    •The crow may be caged, but its thoughts are in the cornfield

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    South Yorkshire.
    Posts
    2,328
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: It started with a float.

    Most of my generation and before started with float fishing.
    How things change, these days I see more younger anglers with rod pods and a couple of rods set ups. The only thing that floats are ducks to new generation anglers.
    There are a couple of young lads that I see occasionally on the commercial I fish. All bivvied up with their rods sat on alarms, they sit there reading or tying rigs waiting for the buzzer to tell of a bite.
    It wouldn't do for me but my style of fishing wouldn't do for most.
    Whatever gets us on the bank is OK with me, being a more proactive angler suits me far better. Sitting waiting for fish goes totally against the grain for me, if I can't get relatively instant action I soon loose concentration and head off home. Catch and I will be there all day.

    Sooner or later the float will once again be the king.

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