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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    shefield, south yorkshire
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    3,669

    Default Hope it's not true.

    I had a visit from an old friend yesterday, we spent most of the afternoon catching up,''I haven't seen him for the last twenty or so years, as he moved some distance away down sarf''.

    As always the conversation revolved around the changes in angling from our early days. At some point in the conversation my friend made the observation, ''can you remember how we used to worry as to reasons why certain species were notorious for dropping baits. ''Certainly I replied'', well it doesn't apply anymore says he, since the introduction of the Bolt Rig, It's now applicable to almost any species.

    Please guys, tell me it ain't so, is nothing safe from this damned invention.

    Time for me to put on the tin hat and up the drawbridge.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    leafy cheshire
    Posts
    12,718

    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    Sorry Derek but are you saying all species are notorious now for dropping the bait or that they are unable to do so because of bolt rigs?

    I can lose fish in all circumstances!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Yorkshire.
    Posts
    10,975

    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    A bit like Mike, I'm not entirely certain as to what you are saying.
    If it's a claim that bolt rigs mean that fish no longer drop baits, it's simply not true. The other minor fly in the ointment is that bolt rigs aren't exactly new. Before anyone coined the term, rigs that had all the same mechanics as a bolt rig existed. Any kind of paternoster is effectively a bolt rig, just not quite as extreme as some modern rigs and lead sizes are.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Old Arley home of the Crows
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    7,607
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    I doubt that the mechanics of any rig work underwater as we imagine them to do and the bolt rig imo is no different in that unless the fish moves away with the bait/hook in its mouth it cannot work any fish that wants to can imo eject the bait before the lead comes in to play.
    •The crow may be caged, but its thoughts are in the cornfield

  5. #5

    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    A short hooklength on a running rig with the line tight to the rod will be a bolt rig.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    You've only got to watch a few of the "Bream Time" videos on YouTube to see how often the underwater camera shows fish failing to be hooked on hair-rigged boilies!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    metroland.....
    Posts
    7,515

    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    One could say a pellet waggler is a bolt rig maybe even a pike bung could be one?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    shefield, south yorkshire
    Posts
    3,669

    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    Firstly let me say, I have never used a Bolt Rig so my opinion,(and that's all it is) is based on bits I've read, or brief references made by others.

    Bach in the day when I did considerable Chub and Barbel fishing, and watching fish on the Yorkshire rivers. We believed as many did around the country that if the fish felt a check when mouthing a bait then that fish would eject the bait pronto. So all efforts were made to ensure that as little resistance as possible would be created, this was whilst ledgering of course.

    I may be way off the target here, but my understanding is that most Bolt Rig set up's are set with a hook out arrangement and heavier lead which is ''not'' free running. Ergo, when a fish mouth's the bait and gets pricked by the hook and bolts off, the weight of the leger sets the hook, so the much heavier lead's used today are used to facilitate that point. I admit, but nonetheless that's my understanding, it all seems crude to me regardless of how refined they may have become.

    And please bear in mind, as with all my posts and contributions they are as they would be ,were we sat in a pub discussing it over a pint.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Old Arley home of the Crows
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    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Gibson View Post
    my understanding is that most Bolt Rig set up's are set with a hook out arrangement and heavier lead which is ''not'' free running. Ergo, when a fish mouth's the bait and gets pricked by the hook and bolts off, the weight of the leger sets the hook
    That to me describes what should happen and maybe on some upressured waters still does but on waters where the fish are a bit cuter it doesn't always work that way. I have seen video somewhere of a fish (carp) that having been pricked by the hook doesn't bolt off but twists and turns until the hook is free, i will see if i can find the video.
    •The crow may be caged, but its thoughts are in the cornfield

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    leafy cheshire
    Posts
    12,718

    Default Re: Hope it's not true.

    As can be seen Derek from the comments to date, your legering with a running lead is still a form of bolt rig! I appreciate that you do not use a method/pellet/banjo/hybrid feeder which are obvious bolt rigs but even a GB feeder with a hook length attached either helicopter style or on a paternoster is a form of bolt rig.

    Ps I hope i am right!

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