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  1. #1
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    Default Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    There has been much talk over the past few weeks about whips and poles. It raises the question again; what's the difference between a small pole and an elasticated whip?


    It occurred to me that it may not be so much about the tackle, but more about how it is rigged that defines what it is. This is how I see it. I may be wrong but it seems logical to me...



    For whip fishing, the rig is almost as long as the whip and fish are swung to hand. A small pole is rigged with a shorter rig and the pole is shipped/collapsed to enable the catch to be swung or netted, just as it would be if using a full-size pole. The latter is also capable of landing larger fish.


    What do you think?


    Ralph.
    Hmmm... Where did that one go?

    My fishing blog

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    I think you answered your own question perfectly in your last sentence...

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    I have a pole and a whip of the same length but they are two very different beasts. The whip is much lighter and of much smaller diameter, designed to have a degree of flex allowing a nice action when swinging to hand and also casting,which if space permits can be done overhead. This isn't practical with the characteristics of a regular pole.

    The primary use of a whip is to catch small fish, the action is such that you are less likely to bump off a fish than you might with a pole, and of course being able to swing to hand in one movement you're able to fish at greater speed.

    The popularity in these older whips such as those from Daiwa is the fact they were made in the UK using quality materials and engineered to a superior degree than many of the current counterparts often coming out of the Far East,

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    Quote Originally Posted by fishplate42 View Post
    There has been much talk over the past few weeks about whips and poles. It raises the question again; what's the difference between a small pole and an elasticated whip?

    It occurred to me that it may not be so much about the tackle, but more about how it is rigged that defines what it is. This is how I see it. I may be wrong but it seems logical to me...

    For whip fishing, the rig is almost as long as the whip and fish are swung to hand. A small pole is rigged with a shorter rig and the pole is shipped/collapsed to enable the catch to be swung or netted, just as it would be if using a full-size pole. The latter is also capable of landing larger fish.

    What do you think?

    Ralph.
    Ralph, An elasticated whip in my view is just a short pole; and is not really a whip.

    A true traditional whip (not one of these modern 'so called' whips which has elastic threaded through it or one of the cheapie hollow tipped £10 jobbies) will have a fine flexible tip and semi flexible blank with which you can strike play and control the fight if a larger fish is hooked rather than just stretch out a bit of elastic; a true whip will be strong enough and light enough to be able to be continually cast overhand, underarm or sideways, and be able to be fished at a greater distance from the tip than a similar length pole.
    Yes swinging in a fish can be done with a similarly rigged pole but for playing and landing a fish when speed fishing, plus the ability to continually cast, a pole just doesn't cut the mustard when your trying to use it as a whip.

    s63 is totally right in my view.

    Keith
    Last edited by Keith M; 11-09-2017 at 11:03.
    Happiness is fish shaped (It used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    Poles are not built for overhand casting, even though a flick tip can be added the action of overhand casting puts the sections at risk. At risk because the weight of the pole puts too much stress on sections.
    I know this because I've tried it and suffered the consequence.

    Elastic can be added to a whip, the need for elastic is surely to handle bigger fish. bigger fish would put the whip at risk.
    Of course cheaper glass whips can be stronger than carbon, the offset is a poor action with a thick tip that can bump off smaller fishes.
    In truth you can use either how you like, you bought the product and it's your choice.

    There's no rule to stop anyone using any tackle how they like, common sense would tell me to look after my whips and to do that I use them for smaller fish generally 2oz to 4oz with .08 to .10 hook lengths, lighter lines I believe get me more bites and to a degree security for my whip. Even if I snag up I can pull for a brake safely.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    Quote Originally Posted by peter crabtree View Post
    I think you answered your own question perfectly in your last sentence...
    Penultimate sentence!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    I think I may have not explained what I was talking about. At one end of the spectrum there are whips and at the other end there are poles. There is no doubt of their intended use.

    What I am talking about are the cheap pole/whips, usually telescopic. The same item can be found described as a whip or a pole. I am suggesting that how it is rigged determines what it is rather what it is sold as.

    Take a £10.00, 5m telescopic pole/whip. Fit elastic through the top two sections and use a rig that is maybe only a foot longer than the fishing depth and it is fished as a 'pole'

    Leave it without elastic an attach a line almost the length of the pole directly to the tip and it is fished as a whip.

    See what I mean?

    Ralph.
    Last edited by fishplate42; 11-09-2017 at 12:26.
    Hmmm... Where did that one go?

    My fishing blog

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    Penultimate paragraph if you're getting picky...,

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    As far as I'm concerned, a true whip will have a flick tip and be fished to hand. It is also likely to have a much smaller diameter than a pole of similar length. It would normally be fished to hand. A whip is less than ideal for fish much bigger than a pound or so, but that doesn't necessarily stop bigger being landed on them. There's nothing to stop a whip being elasticated, but doing so doesn't turn it into a pole. Doing so should allow a slightly better stamp of fish to be targeted, but you till wouldn't want to risk it on an average commercial.

    Lines have been blurred over the years by the way tackle has developed. My earliest memories of whips and "roach" poles are that no one would have any problem telling them apart. I remember buying a halfway house "power whip" in the early 90s. It was essentially a slim, light 9m pole which took elastics up to 14, though that was seriously pushing it. It had no flick tip and made no attempt to be a proper whip. The format, or name, didn't take off at all. I've never seen a similar product from any manufacturer. Shame really as I may just replace what is a rather well used, and tired, tackle anomaly. The closest I've seen since are some of the slim poles that Shimano and Daiwa have occasionally released or the new Acolyte whip (which can be elasticated). I'm rather tempted by the latter, though the price is probably a little too much for me. I wouldn't buy an out and out whip as I'd not get enough use out of a pure flick tip whip.

    We are now in the situation where we have things that might be called slim poles, carp/power/margin poles, silverfish poles (closest to the original roach poles) and whips. The distinctions between them can be blurry at times. If you don't have a longer term familiarity with them, those vague distinctions can seem rather bizarre. After all, they are all essentially just a tapered tube of varying length. As much as anything, it comes down to what application that they were intended (and really suited) for. The bottom line is that elasticating a whip doesn't make it a pole. Fitting a flick tip to a pole doesn't make it a whip. However, there nothing to stop people doing either.
    Last edited by sam vimes; 11-09-2017 at 12:27.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Whip or pole? New thought on old question...

    Action

    Whip = flexible (deliberately so)

    Pole = stiff (again, deliberately so)

    Different uses.

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