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Thread: Bronze Maggots

  1. #1

    Default Bronze Maggots

    Is chrysodine dye still used for colouring maggots? Are bronze maggots now safe?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    bronze Maggots are safe to use,a different dye/colouring is on them,Chrysodine is carciogenic and was stopped being used some years ago, the tackle shop I use will do bronze magggots if you ask in advance, I have not used them for some time, If using white maggots I will coat them in turmeric a couple of days prior to use,

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    Chrysoidine was supposed to have been banned in the eighties. However, I suspect that the angling press talked about a ban being imposed when the reality was somewhat different. Chrysoidine dyes are still in use for some applications. I've come across a few folks that insist that it is sometimes still used to dye maggots. Methic (Methyl?) Orange is supposed to be the modern equivalent. I suspect that if chrysoidine is being used, it'll be by individual tackle shops colouring their own maggots. As far as I'm aware, none of my locals are colouring their own.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    I remember the vogue for Chrysoidine maggots, now discontinued. Banned? It proved hard to find anything definitive online.

    A British Medical Journal in 1984 reviewed the issue. It cites a West Yorkshire study that found no link to cancer, but notes its limitations. It says that its connection to cancer is argued to be circumstantial, but that any evidence should be reported. One case is cited in some detail. Two brothers, both heavy smokers and car-industry workers, fished together regularly for 24 years, both favouring Chrysoidine maggots, hands often stained for days. Both developed bladder cancers, one fatally. The interaction between smoking and dye-use is judged more significant than exposure to the dye alone, and it notes that these anglers were more directly exposed to it, and for longer, than workers in industries where it features.

    I don't know any tackle shops where it is used now. One thing I did notice - but when I backtracked, I didn't find it again -was an article saying that Chrysoidine is one of two dyes that go to colour "disco" pinkies. l hadn't given it any thought, as I probably get through 10 of these little maggots in a year, and then only if I can't catch a small tench in a local pond,or get a bite on some deadly canal outing.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    What about red maggots? Is that a different dye? Are bronze maggots favoured by fish because of the colour or the extra flavour from the colouring process?

  6. #6
    binka Guest

    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    Quote Originally Posted by nottskev View Post
    One thing I did notice - but when I backtracked, I didn't find it again -was an article saying that Chrysoidine is one of two dyes that go to colour "disco" pinkies.
    Could this be the article Kev, towards the end of the second paragraph...

    Maggots – Total Fishing

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    I wouldn't take the risk tbh.
    If bronze is what you think/believe fish prefer, then I would suggest wriggling your maggots in a spoonful of powdered krill for a couple of hours.

    I couldn't honestly say if its the colour they like more than say red or white maggots, but its well known fish love 'Krilled maggots' which turns them a lovely bronzy colour

    Here's a pic of some 'Krilled' dead ones I did earlier


  8. #8

    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    Chris...is that pure krill meal you've used on maggots to colour them?

    and is that riddling or wriggling?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    Quote Originally Posted by mikench View Post
    What about red maggots? Is that a different dye? Are bronze maggots favoured by fish because of the colour or the extra flavour from the colouring process?
    I think the red maggots absorb the dye with whatever they're fed on, whereas the bronzes used to have the dye applied externally. I think there's been some debate about whether it's safe for your local friendly robins to be eating your red maggots (which they do, given half a chance), but again, it's hard to prove anything definitively.
    Last edited by David Rogers 3; 27-11-2017 at 07:59. Reason: Typo correction

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Bronze Maggots

    Quote Originally Posted by mikench View Post
    What about red maggots? Is that a different dye? Are bronze maggots favoured by fish because of the colour or the extra flavour from the colouring process?
    I reckon it's the 'whiteness' of natural undyed maggots that puts fish off - it seems to 'spook' them on occassions. On a small river I found a small shoal trout and hand fed them with some 'mixed' maggots and watched the shoal's reaction.
    Red and orange maggots were their favourites then yellow, green ones were totally ignored, but white ones initially spooked them as they descended the water column - when they hit the bottom the fish's interest would return and they'd move over them to investigate but keep their eyes open to readily intercept any more attractive descending coloured samples.

    When there was a 'carpet' of whites in the gravel, the trout would move over them to 'graze' - using the waft of their fins to lift them off their resting places - before spinning back and snatching them as they started to re-descend.

    This aversion to taking stationary baits off the bottom and trying to make them float-up might explain why I used to catch so many parr foul-hooked in the pectoral and caudal fins!

    I've repeated this experiment on finding shoals of chublets - same results and behaviour but observations usually terminated by the moving-in of a larger specimen scattering the shoal!

    Since then, if I'm planning on a trotting session, I'll usually take bronzies if I can get them, or a half and half mix of reds and plain, which turn off-white by dye transfer in the bait-tub.

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