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Thread: 15' float rods

  1. #1
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    Default 15' float rods

    It's good Friday and out of mere whimsy I thought I'd start a thread about the popularity and usefulness of such a rod. I have no intention of getting one you understand.

    What do the good folks on FM have and are they useful in preference to say a 13 or 14' rod?

  2. #2
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    Oct 2011
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    Default Re: 15' float rods

    If they are a good quality and light enough to be classed as an old style match rod they can be very useful for trotting when the wind is awkward.

    I have a 14 to 16 old Leeda and a TFG 15 foot. Both are not so good for trotting due to weight but I use them both for a sort of adaption of pole fishing. Where I fish a deep reservoir where the bottom drops off sharply I rig up with a centre pin and a pole float and fish almost beneath the rod top. The rod can be balanced across my knee or rested in the pole attachments on my old plastic Shakespere type box.

    Very satisfying way to fish. I can pick up fish on the shelf such as patrolling tench carp and anything else that likes my worms.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 15' float rods

    How useful long rods are depend entirely on an individual and the venues they fish. I'd expect those that predominantly fish commies, and other relatively shallow stillwaters, to have very little use for long rods. There was a short period in time where there was a bit of fuss over margin fishing (mostly on commies) with long rods. I'd actually be quite surprised if such anglers ever bothered with rods in excess of 12'. Based on the impressions given by your HDYGO posts, I'd doubt that you'd use a rod longer than 13' very much.

    If an individual fishes rivers or deep stillwaters I'd expect them to be more likely to have use for a long rod. However, some just can't cope with the prospect of using anything over 14'. Over the years, there have been plenty of bad 15'+ rods, so their reticence is not surprising. There are also plenty of anglers on both types of water that will not own rods of 13'. Whether that's because they employ alternative methods (sliders, float leger, or plain old legering) that enable them to fish deeper water, or if they simply avoid certain swims, is another matter entirely.

  4. #4

    Default Re: 15' float rods

    Until the drennan acolytes became available I never really used a rod over 13 ft.
    In the past I must have has about 4 rods over that lenght preston, and Tri cast jobs. But to be honest I found all of them very tip heavy and I simply could not use them for a full 5 hour match, session without my arm feeling like its dropping off.
    That was untill I took a punt at a 15 foot acolyte and my views have changed ,brilliant rods for running water line control and hitting bites at extreme distances became much more easy. I also now have a 17ft model which again is something else.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: 15' float rods

    When I fished a lot of matches in France and Norway I would often use a "bolo" style rod due to the depth of some of the venues we fished.

    I have a Tri-cast 15' rod that is not really too heavy but can also be boosted to 20' with an extra 5' section.

    I also have a lovely older Milo Bolo' rod that is 7m in length that was purchased for one particular venue in southerm Sweden.

    I have only used the 15 footer a few times on the Avon for trotting on a few swims that were very shallow for the first 5 ot 6 feet then deepened off, but had to take a break every now and then due to the weight of the rod.

    I also have a couple of 14 foot rods, both a Shimano and a Tri-cast, and those were used a lot more . . . . to my mind it is a case of "horses for courses" or having the right tool for the job.

    Scholars have long known that fishing eventually turns men into philosophers.

    Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to buy decent tackle on a philosopher's salary. ~

    Patrick F. McManus






  6. #6

    Default Re: 15' float rods

    I am on.the lookout for a 15 footer or above. My current longest is 14 foot. I think the extra length will be useful when long trotting and especially stretpegging which i do quite allot of. I think while the extra length can be useful for deep swims once you start getting into bigger depths say more than about 10 foot you may as well just fish a slider.

    Trouble is i have not found something i am willing to take a punt on thats below my £100 threshold.
    I wont pay more than that for a rod.
    Last edited by Philip; 19-04-2019 at 10:43.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    Default Re: 15' float rods

    I’ve a 15’ Drennan Matchpro ultralight
    To be honest I find it a delight to use, it’s not a rod for every occasion. But when I do need that little bit extra reach and control it does a great job.
    I’ve never been able to afford lots of rods for every occasion so every purchase is considered and deliberated on, but I’m certainly pleased with the purchase of this one.

  8. #8

    Default Re: 15' float rods

    Longer rods are definitely a big help when floatfishing on rivers. I've never owned one of the super-light Acolytes, but I've always found the trade-off - a little extra weight against increased ease and control - worthwhile for any of the models, such as Preston, Tri-cast, Daiwa, thatI have owned.

    I use 15' rods - usually the Carbonactive 15/17' ( I lost track of the 2' section years ago, and don't care if it ever comes to light) - a lot on stillwater. And not because they're deep; I use sliders for that. I use them for the sheer pleasure of fishing with a long rod and pin. The extra length gives you that bit more line to play with and a bit more range if you want it - with very light floats taking maybe a couple of no 6's or 4's, you don't want to be messing about with loop casts and you can't cast such floats off the reel. The set up gives you some of the advantages of pole fishing, with running line flexibility.

    If the water holds a good mix of fish, the bigger ones are great fun to play on the pin. Many advocates of shorter rods - they tend to be anglers who fish commercials for carp - claim it's an advantage that the fish come to the surface closer to the bank and are easier to net. That's true if your water has banks like a swimming pool. If your banks have reed beds, weed and rough margins and other real-world features,, a long rod is useful for keeping fish out of possible snags.

    One way and another, I wouldn't be without a few rods over 13'.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: 15' float rods

    I've had many 14ft rods and I've had three 15ft rods and I don't like any,I prefer 12 or 13ft rods for float work,river or lake,depths are immaterial as I can handle virtually all situations with a slider if depths are over 10-12ft,it opens up your knowledge on different tactics,I find it hard to believe people don't get on with slider fishing,you just have to sort it out and persevere.

  10. #10

    Default Re: 15' float rods

    One think I will say is if you fancy getting a rod 15 foot plus, try and handle one first even if it means going out of your way.

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