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Thread: Vintage tackle

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    I take it that has reference to a certain 'weirdoh'????

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    Quote Originally Posted by whitty View Post
    I take it that has reference to a certain 'weirdoh'????

    If you mean Mike's comment, I think you are reading too much into it and it's just a bad pun!

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    It was indeed a pun on a range of rods.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    That landing net is not even old it’s a modern reproduction just like all modern reproduction cane rods.
    My brother deals in antiques and says because something is old it doesn’t mean it as any value just what some mug is willing to pay for it.
    So get for it what you can today because tomorrow it could be worth a whole lot less. Today’s antique is tomorrow’s junk.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    Or today’s junk is tomorrow’s antique, some of the stuff we used to throw away when I was a kid as junk now worth a mint, breaks my heart.
    Personally I love a bit of cork and cane but not wicker, spotted an old fishing basket last week on a top shelf in an antique shop, the lady got it down for me and it was a broken wreck and covered in mould, she wanted £30 for it, ****** that but if it was one of Chris Yates throwaways who knows although he looks the type who recycles everything..

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    Quote Originally Posted by markg View Post
    Or today’s junk is tomorrow’s antique, some of the stuff we used to throw away when I was a kid as junk now worth a mint, breaks my heart.
    You must have had for better junk than I did. When I go round a auctions and see what I had on sale it's only worth a couple of ponds if that. It's normally in with a pile of mixed items sold to you for £5.

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    The snag is that it's difficult to second guess what might end up valuable years down the line. I can just remember the last of the Alcocks Match Aerials still hanging around in a local tackle shop. I'm not that old, so it must have been well after they stopped making them. I guess the shop concerned got quite a few for a good price. Even though they weren't overly expensive, they couldn't shift them. They still had them when the shop went under in the late eighties. Thirty years on, people would fight over them and they'd be worth far, far more than the inflationary increase on what they were failing to sell them for.

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    The only "vintage" item of tackle I use these days is a tiny chubber float I made when I was in my teens.
    Another seven years and my old optonics will also qualify!

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    Back in the mid to late 90s a lot of old and even relatively modern fishing books were fetching premium prices; anything by F J Taylor, Peter Stone, Dick Walker, even Yates and plenty of others fetched very good prices and companies like Medlar brought out expensive reprints (typically £50). Yates Casting at the Sun was making over £200. One local angler to me said he regarded his substantial book collection as his additional pension but how prices have fallen. Very few want leather-bound books now and very few books realise the premium prices anymore. Sometimes a high price would flush out a load of books so the price would drop - this happened with Casting at the Sun which can be picked up for much less now (£30). Funnily enough Yates' The Deepening Pool was remaindered off at about £8 then became scarce, fetching £60+, and now it's not hard to find a copy at a reasonable price again.

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Vintage tackle

    I'm not entirely sure that I'd consider Barder rods or landing nets as being "vintage" per se . . . . . I have a Barder Merlin that was quite expensive but is only 25 years old.

    I also have two keep nets that once belonged to Richard Walker (with provenance from his wife) and those I would say were "vintage" and well worth the money I paid for them.

    At the other end of the scale I have a mint condtion Allcocks Taperflash, definitely vintage, but it only cost aout £25 when bought it 10 years ago.

    A decent Mk IV Avon or Carp split cane rod sells today for around £150 while a Wallis Wizard in good condition will fetch £350 or more, so a lot depends on the rod, its provenance and the history that goes with it.

    The modern equivalents, like those from Barder or Linsley will go for quite stunning prices . . . . even though not truly "vintage" . . . .

    Scholars have long known that fishing eventually turns men into philosophers.

    Unfortunately, it is almost impossible to buy decent tackle on a philosopher's salary. ~

    Patrick F. McManus






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