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  1. #1

    Default Rod Material Evolution......

    I vaguely remember Jack Hargreaves in 'Old Country' on the telly in the 80's but wouldn't have been that bothered in the programs as a 10 or so year old.
    I found this one from 1983 on youtube recently and found it very interesting, showing (in the first half) some different rod materials, up to the 'new fangled' Carbon Fibre!




    I'm sure there is a lot of Jack Hargreaves and similar Country matters type programs influence in The Fast Show's Bob Fleming

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Kent
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    4,716

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    Quote Originally Posted by Notts Michael. View Post
    I vaguely remember Jack Hargreaves in 'Old Country' on the telly in the 80's but wouldn't have been that bothered in the programs as a 10 or so year old.
    I found this one from 1983 on youtube recently and found it very interesting, showing (in the first half) some different rod materials, up to the 'new fangled' Carbon Fibre!




    I'm sure there is a lot of Jack Hargreaves and similar Country matters type programs influence in The Fast Show's Bob Fleming
    No doubt influenced by Paul Whitehouse.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    north west london
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    577

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    Love Jack-easily the most laid back presenter on telly, by a country mile. Fair bit of his stuff on youtube.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Hertfordshire
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    1

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    Whatever happened to the Carrot fibre rods that was once deemed as the next rod material to Carbon fibre?

    Keith
    Happiness is fish shaped (It used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    North West
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    2,503

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith M View Post
    Whatever happened to the Carrot fibre rods that was once deemed as the next rod material to Carbon fibre?

    Keith
    I’m a celery man, myself!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    I grew up using a whole cane float rod - horrible really. Also tried greenheart rod tips (awful)

    then

    a wholecane rod with a solid fibreglass tip section - bit better

    then

    a built cane rod - horrible heavy, spongy

    then

    a selection of different hollow glass rods - vastly better, those horrible brass ferrules soon disappeared with spigots or overfit joints instead, hollow glass rods were becoming really good then carbon appeared

    then up to present

    more than a few carbon fibre rods. Most modern carbon rods are superb compared to built cane. Why there is still an interest in using crappy built cane is beyond me?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    South East England
    Posts
    4,091

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    I think when we were kids we only had cheap crappy cane rods. Now we are older and have a few bob we can afford decent ones. Overinflated prices and old they may be but they are still good rods and some argue better in some ways than carbon rods. I have held or fished with some of those very good cane rods and they were nothing like those cheap crappy things that were usually fostered on us by hard up dads
    It might be the same for modern rods today in the future when some new material is the norm. The crappy carbon ones will be history but the really good ones might be sought after still. It’s the same with most things when you think about it, cars, records, art etc.
    Back to Jack Hargreaves, he was a delightful presenter, he was like valium.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    on the move
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    2,068

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    Quote Originally Posted by peterjg View Post
    I grew up using a whole cane float rod - horrible really. Also tried greenheart rod tips (awful)

    then

    a wholecane rod with a solid fibreglass tip section - bit better

    then

    a built cane rod - horrible heavy, spongy

    then

    a selection of different hollow glass rods - vastly better, those horrible brass ferrules soon disappeared with spigots or overfit joints instead, hollow glass rods were becoming really good then carbon appeared

    then up to present

    more than a few carbon fibre rods. Most modern carbon rods are superb compared to built cane. Why there is still an interest in using crappy built cane is beyond me?
    I followed the same path but still do have a couple of cane rods.
    The same sort of path can be followed by my reels. From boys reels, cheap and cheerful bakelite through to today state of the art reels.
    There are still those that prefer using old rods and reels but give me modern tackle any day.

    Jack Hargreaves TV programmes still can be watched through Rose tinted glasses. Memories of what we thought were the good old days.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Yorkshire.
    Posts
    10,836

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    I couldn't care less about what other people might choose to use for fishing. I'll use whatever I think best for the job in hand, or whatever brings me the most enjoyment. For me, that revolves around floatfishing, often with long rods and invariably with a centrepin (if I'm fishing flowing water). I have no interest in vintage gear, of any description, unless it's better than anything else available. The closest I get to using vintage gear is Abu closed face reels. My legering gear is going to qualify as vintage sooner or later as I won't even bother to update/upgrade it. For the amount of use it gets, it's perfectly adequate. I have just one fibreglass rod lurking somewhere. The first rod I ever used. I've seen some really bad carbon rods over the years that I'd prefer to use. I wouldn't know a good cane rod if you spanked my backside with it. However, I've never picked one up that could be considered to be light. For that reason alone, I'm uninterested in cane rods.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Rod Material Evolution......

    I just saw the tail-end of the pre-carbon rods. When I started fishing, the older kids who let me tag along to the canal had glass rods. The two kids who took it most seriously had Mordex and Milbro rods. They all seemed to have an old cane rod or two in the shed, hand-me-downs from dads or grandads who'd mostly given it up. I used to be allowed to borrow one of these, and I caught my first few fish with a bit of line tied to the end of a 9' cane rod. One lad had a posh cane rod, a very different beast to the shed remnants. It was surprisingly light and had a springy, unexpectedly "live" feel if you waggled it. Maybe that feel is what the retro dudes rave about? I don't know, as that was the last time I held a cane rod.

    I had a few glass rods over the next years: a Sealey Blue Match (lovely soft tip), a B+W CTM 12' ( respected make but horrible action), a Shakespeare International (came with a cracked joint, so I claimed a refund) and, my favourite in glass, a Shakespeare Sigma Canal which I used so much I re-ringed it twice. I also had a couple of leger rods made by the East Anglian Rod Co - they were fine, and no big issue with weight at 9' or 10'.

    The first carbon rods I met were a revelation. But they were pricey, and cost £100+ in the early 80's. They were by no means all great - the first one I splashed out on - a handsome B+W jet-black creation - proved too stiff and powerful for any of the fishing I did, and I swapped it for a Sundridge Kevin Ashurst, much better for light lines. The step-change from glass to carbon was huge, and even thought the weights have been shaved down and designs improved, there haven't been any comparable new developments.

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