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  1. #1
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    Do consecutive frosts have the same effect as a single frost?

    I mean for example, its a sunny cold day (like yesterday) thenlast nightits a clear sky and we got a frost, then today its exactly the same, bright sunny and cold, then again another frost tonight for the 2nd night in a row...

    What effect on fishing will a 2nd straight frost have?

  2. #2
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    On a deep stillwater 10+ ft very little. On a shallow water a great deal. Water is a very bad conductor of heat andtakes a long time to warm or cool down. Deep waters at this time of year are pretty constant in temperature 42-46 F. Shallow ones can vary widely particularly if you get a wind with the cold temperatures, which mixes the water up.

  3. #3
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    A second frost during the night after the first frost will tend to lower the water temperature further, provided the maximum temperatures during the first two days are roughly the same.

  4. Default

    After two consecutive frosts I've fished tonight and had a 5lb barbel...result!!

  5. #5
    Cakey Guest

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    Im a believer that if the air pressure stays constant then no effects on two nights offrost

  6. Default



    Having said that, there was a bit of water in the river and a nice drop of colour....

    I reckon that it takes a while for temperature drops to affect the river, especially in the deeper areas where the fish are laid up; conversely, it takes a while for a warm spell to impact on the water temperature (pure theory as I have never been one for taking water temperatures).

    Not sure on how the thermoclime principle relates to running water, butI should imagine thatits a lot more complex than you think; for instance, for some distance below a weir you would expect the effects of warmer or colder weather to have a quicker impact due to the mixing of the water in the weir pool (am I making sense?)

  7. #7
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    Tony Thermoclines don't happen on running water and on deep stillwaters (waters over 20 ft deep) where they do happen, they only occur in the summer months.

    I can see the logic of your thinking re river and weirs but it's not totally correct.River temperatures are acomplexmatter, but as a rule of thumb, they are more or less the same temperature from the the upper midsection down to the estuary. The upper zone on the hills, the temperature will generally be colder that the mid section simply because the hills are a colder place for much of the yearthan the lowlands.There may be a short period of time during the high summer when the two are equal. And that is only likely where the head of the river leaches out of bogland. If the headof the river starts from a deepunderground aquifer the waterleaving it is going to be much colder (between 42 -50 F) than the surface source head.

    In the winter the opposite is true. The aquifer water is still between 42-50F, as the water temperature in aquifers doesn't vary much, a couple of degrees F at most. But the bog water may be nearfreezing, 34-38 F,for much of the winter.

    By now you kinda get the picture of the complexity of it and I've not even factored in warm and coldrain, heat island effects of discharges from towns and cities, other discharges from lakes, reservoirs and so on.

  8. Default

    <blockquote class=quoteheader>The bad one wrote (see)</blockquote><blockquote class=quote>

    Tony Thermoclines don't happen on running water and on deep stillwaters (waters over 20 ft deep) where they do happen, they only occur in the summer months.

    I can see the logic of your thinking re river and weirs but it's not totally correct.River temperatures are acomplexmatter, but as a rule of thumb, they are more or less the same temperature from the the upper midsection down to the estuary. The upper zone on the hills, the temperature will generally be colder that the mid section simply because the hills are a colder place for much of the yearthan the lowlands.There may be a short period of time during the high summer when the two are equal. And that is only likely where the head of the river leaches out of bogland. If the headof the river starts from a deepunderground aquifer the waterleaving it is going to be much colder (between 42 -50 F) than the surface source head.

    In the winter the opposite is true. The aquifer water is still between 42-50F, as the water temperature in aquifers doesn't vary much, a couple of degrees F at most. But the bog water may be nearfreezing, 34-38 F,for much of the winter.

    By now you kinda get the picture of the complexity of it and I've not even factored in warm and coldrain, heat island effects of discharges from towns and cities, other discharges from lakes, reservoirs and so on.</blockquote>


    Ther's always a danger of making a tw*t of yourself when you start discussing things that you have little knowledge of!

    I don't mind though because I now understand a little bit more about the river than I did before, thanks to your excellent reponse Bad One[img]/forum/smilies/smile_smiley.gif[/img](the moral of this is don't be afraid to ask stupid questions!![img]/forum/smilies/wink_smiley.gif[/img])

    Still need to understand more about the effects of environmental factors on fish, particularly with respect to locating them and their propensity to feed.

    Anyone know of any good reading or articles online that deal with this important aspect of angling?

  9. #9
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    This is very interesting and im glad i asked now.

    Tony you dont look like a tw@... not at all.

  10. Default



    on a pond which temp is more important thermocline or hypolimnion

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