Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    North Lancashire
    Posts
    1,591

    Default Interim Research Reports of the big angling research project have now published

    They’re on the website at Welcome to the Angling Research Website! | Angling Research

    The language may be a bit dry, but remember this research is not really aimed at anglers. Rather, it is being undertaken to inform ‘policy makers’.

  2. #2

    Default

    "Over a third (34%) of game angling respondents viewed their participation as high intensity physical activity – a much greater proportion than coarse or sea angling respondents. More detailed research into the physical activity involved in angling participation is needed to help understand these inconsistencies..." (page 4)

    If only Deanos was back on board FM, he could sort that question in a second


    Isn't the answer just 'mobility'... 'legering' vs. 'spinning' etc.


    Seriously though, great to see a concerted effort at long last to influence policy-makers' perceptions of our sport.

    ---------- Post added at 22:35 ---------- Previous post was at 22:18 ----------

    Disappointing that no one bothered to proof read the document given its official nature.
    Last edited by Dicky (Angling Trust PAC); 15-12-2009 at 21:36. Reason: **** sentence structure

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    North Lancashire
    Posts
    1,591

    Default

    I picked up exactly that same point. My response;

    ‘Most game anglers employ fishing techniques – specifically fly fishing and lure fishing – that demand a constant cycle of casting and retrieving, with the angler frequently moving after every cast.’

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Azide the Stour
    Posts
    3,922

    Default Angling - high intensity?

    I read the report. It's clear that the respondents have no idea of what constitutes 'high intensity' activity. In many active sports like running, rowing, cycling etc. high intensity is defined by a heart rate at 85% of optimum max which is derived using a formula (max = (220 - age?)). Such a heart rate would also have a measurable oxygen demand so that the lungs would also be stressed. At this level of activity you know you are doing it! You sweat and are breathing heavily, unless very fit. Indeed, this is how you achieve cardiac fitness through training and why these other sports need much higher levels of fitness.

    Whilst active angling such as fly casting might be more active than some other forms of angling it still only constitutes low level activity because there is little increase in heart and lung activity, unless you are very unfit. It is tiring but sustainable over several hours, especially with a little practice.

    The only times I've seen anglers under 'high activity' stress is through carrying too much gear (over 100lbs) over rough terrain (especially pebble beaches). Then they are sweating and their heart rate is raised. I know of a couple of cases of fatal heart attacks in these circumstances.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Rotherham South Yorkshire
    Posts
    32,331
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    In fact the better you get at fly casting the less energy you use.

    Distance casting on lakes and reservoirs normally takes the maximum amount of energy, but with practice you can get any distance up to 30 yards with only 2 false casts.

    Make no mistake, the carrying of heavy gear does require the most energy, this is why we more elderly anglers don't do too much coarse fishing any more.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    4,587
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default

    Stressing the lungs and increasing heart rate and coase anglers. Emm that bloody route march I do twice a week up the hill from the river certainly does that! And with 25-30 lbs of tackle on me back, something the licra boys and girles don't do in the friggin gym at 57 that's for sure!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Yorkshire Dales
    Posts
    3,123

    Default

    I can just picture it now Phil, you in tight body lycra flogging your way up that hill in sub zero temps with your nipples standing out like chapel hat pegs.

  8. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by john conway (CSG - ACA) View Post
    I can just picture it now Phil, you in tight body lycra flogging your way up that hill in sub zero temps with your nipples standing out like chapel hat pegs.

    Blimey John.......i was enjoying a nice Scotch then, kinda knocked the edge off it!

    Chapel hat pegs? lol lol

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Wintle View Post
    I read the report. It's clear that the respondents have no idea of what constitutes 'high intensity' activity. In many active sports like running, rowing, cycling etc. high intensity is defined by a heart rate at 85% of optimum max which is derived using a formula (max = (220 - age?)). Such a heart rate would also have a measurable oxygen demand so that the lungs would also be stressed. At this level of activity you know you are doing it! You sweat and are breathing heavily, unless very fit. Indeed, this is how you achieve cardiac fitness through training and why these other sports need much higher levels of fitness.

    Whilst active angling such as fly casting might be more active than some other forms of angling it still only constitutes low level activity because there is little increase in heart and lung activity, unless you are very unfit. It is tiring but sustainable over several hours, especially with a little practice.

    The only times I've seen anglers under 'high activity' stress is through carrying too much gear (over 100lbs) over rough terrain (especially pebble beaches). Then they are sweating and their heart rate is raised. I know of a couple of cases of fatal heart attacks in these circumstances.
    I remember having to think about that question because it wasn't explained at all well - also a lot of the anglers were in the higher age brackets where high intensity probably doesn't mean the same thing as a full cardio workout.

    Most worrying thing about that report is anglers ages, I think lack of participation rather than the Anti's will be the Angling's main problem for generations to come.

    Clubs should be encouraged to teach more youngsters somehow, maybe the EA could pay

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •