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  1. #1
    MarkTheSpark Guest

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    After a time, the CCD on an SLR will gather some dust. Most SLRs have a 'mirror lock' facility so you can access the CCD and clean it. But for heaven's sake don't do what I did - you might not get away with it.

    The first thing is NEVER to just hold the shutter button on B to keep the mirror up. Accidentally release the button and you're looking at a very big bill. Use the proper function shown in your manual.

    NEVER try to clean the CCD with any kind of swab or cotton bud with the exception of the special 20 kits sold for the purpose. Even then, be really, really careful.

    The dust can usually be blown off the CCD with a bulb puffer, NOT a puffer brush. Hold the camera upside down as you do this so nothing else falls inside.

    And <u>don't</u> use canned air to blow the dust away. I tried, and a jet of propellant shot out straight on to the CCD, leaving a big splodge. Using a very expensive swab kit (like I say, 20 minimum) I managed to get the splodge off, but if you're really unlucky, the freezing action of the propellant shatters the CCD.

  2. #2
    Cakey Guest

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    my local shop does mine for me free ................or I dont upgrade with them anymore
    my new 400D is self cleaning but still needs a manual clean now and then apparently

  3. #3
    Cakey Guest

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    and I dont know if its me or not but there seems so much more dust these days

  4. #4
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    One of the main disadvantages of the digi SLR is of course the fact that dust and other foreign bodies can get in the CCD whan you change lenses.

    If you want to change your lense, try and find a nice clean spot away from rain, dust and other such muck to do it.

    Only change lenses when you have to and don't keep taking the lens off "To have a look inside".

    And follow the cleaning instructions in the manual to the letter.

  5. #5
    The Monk Guest

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    yes the CCD plain can be a problem but if you follow the manufacturers instructions you should be fine

  6. #6
    Graham Marsden (ACA) Guest

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    Buy a good quality zoom like an 18 - 200mm and don't take it off.

  7. #7
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    I haven't taken my 18-70 zoom off since I have had it Graham.

  8. #8
    MarkTheSpark Guest

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    Buy a good quality zoom like an 18 - 200mm and don't take it off

    Is there such a thing? My experience of really big range zooms is barrel distortion at the wide end, vignetting, too low a max aperture and all kinds of contrast control issues.

    Truth to tell, I use my 24-70 2.8 nearly all the time, but even the occasional lens change lets some dust in.

    Interestingly, Sigma's just issued its SD14 - what a tool, and it's got sensor protection so you can scrub away with cotton buds like a nutter. Read all about it here

  9. #9
    The Monk Guest

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    so you can scrub away with cotton buds like a nutter.

    haha nice one Mark, yes it sounds good

    I rarely change my lenses except in the case of when I do a bit of wildlife photography and put a 600mm lense on, I do this however in a specially designed darkroom bag which grips around the large lense once the baynet end is in the bag

  10. #10
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    That's a good idea mate.

    I've messed about with a few dark room bags in my life too!

    I've done quite a bit of photography with my Nikon 18-70 zoom. The pictures seem to be spot on, not much sign of barrel distortion. Mind you the lens gets great reviews.

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