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  1. #1
    Coops Guest

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    Looking at the BRFC list I see the record for the Walleye is an 11 lb 12 oz fish caught in 1934 by F Adams from the The Delph, Welney, Norfolk.

    Not knowing much about the species I'm curious to know how they came to be there, are they still there and why, being so similar to zander, they didn't 'invade' the fens like zander did? Especially as they seem to have been in the area a good deal longer than zander.

    Anyone know anything about these fish and whether they are still caught today?

  2. #2
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    I doubt very much if the American Walleye exists in Fenland today.

    There is a reasonably documented account of twenty Walleye - Stizostedion vitreum being placed as fingerlings into The Great Ouse near Earith ca 1925. It was late thought that these were black bass.

    But we can never be sure. It could be that the Walleye record may have been misidentified and was a zander Stizostedion lucioperca in the first place.

  3. #3
    David Marrs Guest

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    The record caught by Mr Adams was set up and displayed in a Cambridge Fish and Chip shop!

    My thoughts are that perhaps 20 of them weren't quite enough to ensure a successful breeding year and hence the fish either became lonely nomads, or that they were predated upon and didn't survive.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Cambridgeshire
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    232

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    The Walleye, presuming they were walley, must have done pretty well to survive as fingerling in The Gt Ouse will all the predators around if there was only origonaly twenty, talk about run the gauntlet!
    I suspect the zander had it a little easier in the relief channel as i believe it was dug in the late fifty's & had'nt been flooded long.
    I have always presumed the first zander were intoduced in 63 (not including Wobun Abbey) Where they introduced earlier?

  5. #5
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    I would like to examine this walleye in the Cambridge Chippy if it's still there. Walleye and zander are closely related, but they can be distinguished by the position of the ventral fins. Also walleye are slightly more slender than zander.

    If zander were inroduced into the Relief Channel in 1963, it is very likely that the record walleye was a walleye.

    According to "Zander" by Rickards and Fickling, first published in 1979, the stocking of twenty walleye into the River Ouse in 1925, were thought to be black bass. These fish did come from the USA.

    I reckon that walleye and smallmouth black bass fingerlings would look very similar to an untrained eye.

    But the record Walleye came from the River Delph.

    However having just spoken to Christine Rickards who knows the fens like the back of her hand, she confirms that flooding could have caused the walleye to migrate to the Delph.

  6. #6
    Coops Guest

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    Thanks guys, explains things I think. If only 20 were introduced it seems one did well to migrate to the Delph and achieve 11 lbs in weight. Shame it got knocked on the head when it was caught, but I guess that was the only way to claim a record back then.

    It must have been a right fluke to catch it in the first place. Imagine chasing just 20 fish less casualties in all that expanse of water. Mind boggling odds.

  7. #7
    Coops Guest

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    Thanks guys, explains things I think. If only 20 were introduced it seems one did well to migrate to the Delph and achieve 11 lbs in weight. Shame it got knocked on the head when it was caught, but I guess that was the only way to claim a record back then.

    It must have been a right fluke to catch it in the first place. Imagine chasing just 20 fish less casualties in all that expanse of water. Mind boggling odds.

  8. #8
    Ron 'The Hat' Clay (ACA) Guest

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    I now wonder who actually stocked the walleye into the Ouse believing them to be small mouth bass.

    My feeling it could have been an ex-pat American, longing for the species of home.

    Certainly there are small mouth bass living and thriving near Mildenhall US Airforce Base. I would give anything to investigate these fish.

    Do the Americans really have sole control over what is in fact English territory?

    We don't control any part of The States do we?

  9. #9

    Default

    I believe this fish was investigated by Hugh Reynolds and was positively identified as a Walleye!

    The Delph and the Gt. Ouse are separated only by sluice gates at 7 holes sluice [Old local name] at Earith. So not much of a problem for a fish to migrate into the Delph.
    I wonder, were the fingerling's stocked into the tidal Gt. Ouse at Earith or above the tide at Brownshill Staunch, just a mile or so upstream? It seems an odd place to stock fish into?
    The chippy was situated in Catherine Street but I don't think it exists any more.

    Colin

  10. #10

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    Mildenhall US Airforce base is in fact RAF Mildenhall run by the US Military for us!

    Can I come and watch if or when you try to get inside please? {)

    Colin

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