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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Manchester
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    Default Splicing a Quiver tip into a top section of a rod

    Buy a push in Q tip of a good rod make.
    Strip off the rings so its a blank
    Roughly measure the Q tip against the rod top (outside diameter) and cut the rod top with fine hacksaw blade on a block of wood, at the same thickness as the Q tip is 3 inches from thick end.
    Mark the 3 inches mark on the Q tip with a pencil all the way round.
    Slide the Q tip down the top section so it pocks out of the hole of the rod top. At this point it will not be at the pencil mark. It will give you a measure of how short it is from the pencil mark.
    Push it back up and out of the top section and cut 1/2 inch off the top section. Repeat the process as above.
    Do this by repeating the process until you get the pencil mark just showing.
    When your happy that the Q tip is fitting correctly take some epoxy resin on a fine piece of dowel, I use cocktail sticks. and insert the resin in the top section where the tip will come out. Roll it it around inside a few time to distribute it as evenly as you can.
    Insert the Q tip down the top until it pops out and pull gently until the pencil mark shows. Twist the tip around a few time to distribute the resin on to both parts.
    Leave overnight to set after cleaning off the excess resin with thinners or similar.
    Re-whip the rings on the Q tip and a whipping of about 3/4 to an inch over the spigot section of the rod top section. Re-vanish all the whippings several times and the Q tip section.

    Job done!!!!!!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    A sleepy pool in deepest Surrey
    Posts
    861

    Default

    John Wilson writes of building such a tip with what he called a 'Donkey Top'. He advocated dropping it through from inside with a sharp tap to locate it inside the carbon rod tip section and then whipping it in place. Just as with setting up a pole for elastication with a bung a Vernier guage saves a lot of messing about, but like anything else...measure twice and cut once.

    The theory was that should it ever break...a sharp tap the other way, after removing the whipping and rings, would make replacement so much easier.


    Murphy's Law has blessedly applied here and since buying a few 'glass tip sections I have never broken another rod tip
    The Indifferent Crucian.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Hertfordshire
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    3,329
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    Default

    Happiness is fish shaped (It used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Lydney, in the Forest of Dean
    Posts
    9,147

    Default

    That makes a lot of sense Keith but is it as easy as it looks on the diagram? Where do differing tapers come in all this?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Hertfordshire
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    Default

    I can see a problem if the tapers are vastly different, but the rod tapers were not that different in practice to the inserted donkey-tips (at their base), and I used to drop the tip through first just to make sure it fitted fairly snuggly before I took it out and added glue; and if it didn’t fit snuggly enough inside the join then some emery cloth or glass paper used at the base of the donkey tip took care of any major differences in internal tapers if the araldite couldn't.

    The only thing that I had to do was to 'drop' the tip smartly inside of the rod section vertically to prevent the glue from sticking to the inside before it emerged out at the end; On the very rare occasion when the glue did get stuck to the inside of the blank before the tip emerged from the end I used a thin metal rod to push the tip through to the end and also wipe off any glue deposited on the inside of the blank; but that rarely ever happened and it used to drop through to the end almost every time.
    I only used a thin-ish smear of glue anyway.

    Usually I had the foot of a rod-ring whipped over the join which minimised any extra stiffness which could be caused by extra whippings.
    Last edited by Keith M; 17-02-2010 at 11:47.
    Happiness is fish shaped (It used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    A sleepy pool in deepest Surrey
    Posts
    861

    Default

    I think you can get away with using no glue at all. Unless the tapers are quite different you can just drop it through 'dry' and whip it in place. As long as the whipping carries on to the new section, that section can't go back inside.

    It's a great way of repairing a broken rod and can always be replaced at another date. Not quite the versatility of a push in quivertip, but suprisingly progressive in action usually.


    Personally I like to see a little more overlap of the two sections than in Keiths image....say 3 inches..it doesn't seem to create a flatspot in the curve.
    The Indifferent Crucian.

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