Thanks Thanks:  1
Likes Likes:  4
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Isle of Onamower
    Posts
    742

    Default Items of traditional tackle…

    That have yet to be surpassed?

    Yes, this occurred to me from the Perch video thread but one thing that struck me is that the traditional Perch bobber is unrivalled in its merit and as yet is unsurpassed.

    I doubt it ever will be, it’s quite simply a proven classic based upon sound principle.

    What else springs to mind which, in the face of all the modern technology and marketing hype, still stands head and shoulders above its modern day challengers?

    Late 80’s/early 90’s match rods (surely dropping into the 'vintage' category by now for all but the most hardened of purists), certain bait droppers, particular lines… Who knows?
    Born to mow... Long grass is our enemy!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Kent
    Posts
    5,196

    Default Re: Items of traditional tackle…

    It’s puzzled me, you’re the best man I can think of to answer this question Steve.

    We have assumed in that video that the boy was most probably using maggots or worms, why use a bobber? I read that perch can be very sensitive to resistance, something a bobber has far more of than a “skinny” float. I understand it’s advantages over a livebait but over worm or maggots?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    There
    Posts
    5,572

    Default Re: Items of traditional tackle…

    As a youngster the only float I owned was similar to a perch bobber. We used to call them grayling floats, never having any idea what a grayling looked like. I had no notion as to sensitivity issues when using these for fish in a park lake.

    I have noticed that in any depiction of a fishing float by non anglers in adverts etc it is a bobber style float that is used.

    Nowadays I do own and use them but purely with a small live bait or lob worm for perch. Large perch by the way which have eluded me for the last season or two.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    North Shropshire
    Posts
    478

    Default Re: Items of traditional tackle…

    I user bobbers and chubber style floats for most of my perch fishing which is mainly on the Severn . I like to fish lob worms laying on as I find perch prefer the bait stationary . I'll twitch the bait now and again to induce bites. I must admit I haven't found using a heavy float to be a problem , not sure the resistance thing is a big issue on rivers . A bigger float for me helps with the presentation and controlling the positioning of the bait . Spent most of the wet weekend trying to knock some up

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Isle of Onamower
    Posts
    742

    Default Re: Items of traditional tackle…

    Quote Originally Posted by s63 View Post
    It’s puzzled me, you’re the best man I can think of to answer this question Steve.

    We have assumed in that video that the boy was most probably using maggots or worms, why use a bobber? I read that perch can be very sensitive to resistance, something a bobber has far more of than a “skinny” float. I understand it’s advantages over a livebait but over worm or maggots?
    I'm dismissing maggots out of hand John, he appears to be an experienced angler and whilst maggots are an excellent Perch bait, especially when trickled in and fished on the drop, a bobber would be the last choice of float for its insensitivity for such a small bait which a sizable Perch would engulf without hesitation.

    So why such a good choice with worms?

    Occasionally it won't matter and a Perch will hit a worm in a manner which makes the float irrelevant but often they will be clumsy... The very nature of a worm being sucked in will often see repeated attempts by the lazy gits bouncing off the outers of their mouths before they finally engulf it and immerse that bobber.

    That introduces another element in that the movement of a worm appeals to the predatory nature of the Perch and not the fact that it's a worm and what we consider a natural bait, Des Taylor summed this up perfectly during a talk he was giving when he asked how many worms do Perch see swimming by them forty yards out in a gravel pit?

    So, it's the movement and not necessarily the bait which is why lures are so good for those who prefer to use them, a bit like those falling maggots as opposed to those laying on the bottom... A kind of thrill of the chase so to speak.

    I also believe that the more wary and bigger fish will test a bait, provoking and sucking at it to see what happens before building up the confidence to take it.

    And then there's the playful characteristic of the Perch, akin to marvelling at the food on the end of your fork before engulfing it beyond retrieve.

    All of these things register on the float and if you commit to a strike before the Perch commits to a bait you'll go a lap early and you'll miss out.

    In short, a Perch bobber or worm float has to withstand all of those elements before registering a truly committed bite and I doubt that many of them can weigh up the extra weight to resistance ratio of what in reality is a generally alien but highly provocative bait and prospective food source.
    Last edited by Aknib; 16-02-2020 at 19:21.
    Born to mow... Long grass is our enemy!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Items of traditional tackle…

    The older centrepins have never been surpassed, I have a 1914 aerial reel which is as smooth and free, if not more free running than any of my modern reels.

    Perch bobbers, I use to have loads in different sizes and grew up using them for pike fishing as well as perch. I think the perch bobber is more for using small lives.
    If i'm honest i'm not a fan of the bobber float and unless I was targetting perch with small lives then i'd prefer to use a more sensitive float.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    3,627
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Items of traditional tackle…

    The old traditional ‘semi’ loaded Onion waggler which flies through the air without the characteristic waggle that gives the waggler its name; is very accurate when cast; can be cast tight up to lillies or the far bank or overhanging branches etc. and is very sensitive too; and is also a good float to combat surface drift with its smallish bulbous body low down below a longish stem in the underflow.

    If wind conditions are not perfect (which is often the case) and I need to cast with a lot of accuracy, or I need to cast tight up to lilly pads or tight to an island or the far bank, or I’m chasing Rudd shoals moving across a lake at distance with a light and sensitive float then the chances are that a good ‘Onion’ waggler will be my choice..



    Keith
    Last edited by Keith M; 18-02-2020 at 13:19.
    Happiness is fish shaped (It used to be woman shaped but the wife is getting on a bit now)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    The Nene Valley
    Posts
    12,536

    Default Re: Items of traditional tackle…

    Quote Originally Posted by s63 View Post
    I read that perch can be very sensitive to resistance
    I believe that they are very sensitive to a change in resistance - not so much in light steady resistance itself.
    That's about as big as a fish that big gets
    If you understand what you’re doing, you’re not learning anything................

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •