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  1. #11

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    I'm curious about the appeal of these Hexagraphs. I'm not knocking the idea - I'm a little bit envious of the way you've refined your tackle down to exactly what you like, Steve, and I'd like to do something similar since mine's rather more random, though with a fondness for Japanese classics, if that's a category that has any validity.

    But I'm wondering where the Hexagraph advantage lies. I do like the look of them - full cork handles, sliding winch fittings, even the yellowish colour. It evokes a picture of fishing I like. The website claims two main advantages: resistance to ovaling when under stress, and lack of a spine leading to more accurate casting. But it's not as if these are pressing problems with carbon. Every carbon rod I've had has proved a bit stronger than its designation would suggest, and none has ever broken, even on the rogue fish like carp and pike that turn up when you're fishing light. And as for accurate casting... I've not been out for two months, so I could probably cast into any tree within reach just now, but when your eye is in, carbon rods will land your float or feeder on a sixpence.

    So what is the beauty of these rods? Are they reputed to play fish with better feel? Are they more robust? Or is it mainly an aesthetic thing?

    As I said, I'm not out to criticise them, just interested where their mystique derives from - and why no other manufacturer, as far as I know, has gone down that route.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    North Yorkshire.
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    10,973

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    Quote Originally Posted by nottskev View Post
    Is it mainly an aesthetic thing?
    Like you, I don't really know, but I have my suspicions. However, much like the Daiwa Haxagon Whisker (fly) rods, I'm fascinated by them. I've barely seen any in the flesh, let alone used one. If it were cheap enough, I'd love to buy one. The prospect of that happening is rather unlikely.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Isle of Onamower
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    346

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    Quote Originally Posted by nottskev View Post
    I'm curious about the appeal of these Hexagraphs. I'm not knocking the idea - I'm a little bit envious of the way you've refined your tackle down to exactly what you like, Steve, and I'd like to do something similar since mine's rather more random, though with a fondness for Japanese classics, if that's a category that has any validity.

    But I'm wondering where the Hexagraph advantage lies. I do like the look of them - full cork handles, sliding winch fittings, even the yellowish colour. It evokes a picture of fishing I like. The website claims two main advantages: resistance to ovaling when under stress, and lack of a spine leading to more accurate casting. But it's not as if these are pressing problems with carbon. Every carbon rod I've had has proved a bit stronger than its designation would suggest, and none has ever broken, even on the rogue fish like carp and pike that turn up when you're fishing light. And as for accurate casting... I've not been out for two months, so I could probably cast into any tree within reach just now, but when your eye is in, carbon rods will land your float or feeder on a sixpence.

    So what is the beauty of these rods? Are they reputed to play fish with better feel? Are they more robust? Or is it mainly an aesthetic thing?

    As I said, I'm not out to criticise them, just interested where their mystique derives from - and why no other manufacturer, as far as I know, has gone down that route.
    I'll be honest Kev, I was initially drawn by the aesthetics.

    I can understand that sounding incredibly shallow but I spend most of my time moaning about and even dismissing tackle for the same reason and the Hexagraph was a bit of a 'love at first sight' type of thing.

    I'm not overly convinced that there's any benefit over a round blank, even if round blanks can really oval out under high load and I have to say that I doubt I'd even know if one of mine ever had.

    Other than that it just ties in nicely with what I generally like in an understated manner, there's no doubting that everything is of the highest quality but it's just the way they've assembled it all and the end result which really draws me.

    For me they look traditional even if that's a bit of a smokescreen but that in turn affords much better materials which will offer me a better all round experience, if they did exactly the same thing on a conventional shaped blank I'd be equally drawn to it.

    Having said that, as the Hexagraph started it all I don't think I'd be as content with anything other than one if I go down that route... Which I'm pretty sure I will at some point but not now at the sacrifice of what I already have, it will just take longer but the felling season will be starting again soon and I have a sneaky suspicion the sporadic overtime situation will become much more certain and at quite a lucrative rate

    I feel a trip down to Huntingdon coming on...
    Born to mow... Long grass is our enemy!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    The Nene Valley
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    12,326

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    This is what B&W say about the rods............

    The original thinking with Hexagraph was to make rods which eliminated all the in-built shortcomings of tubular rods. Most prominent among these faults is for the tube to go into oval shape when put under stress or load, and for it then to lose considerable strength. Another problem manifests itself in the manufacturing process when the matrix of carbon is wound on to a mandrel. This leaves a ‘spine’ or portion of carbon which overlaps another. Due to the taper of the rod this ‘spine’ never runs true and it is the cause of inaccurate casting.

    All the above shortcomings are in-built in all tubular rods and may only be reduced by such concepts as our Expert range where wall thicknesses are increased and overall diameters reduced. Then, by using the very latest and highest quality carbon it is possible to produce rods which are lighter, length for length, than tubular rods have ever been before.

    On a power to weight ratio, and length for length, Hexagraph has eclipsed the performance of any other production rod today. They are highly labour intensive, just like the old split cane rods of yesteryear. Each single Hexagraph rod takes a staggering 400 hours of labour to create, from start to finish.
    That's about as big as a fish that big gets
    If you understand what you’re doing, you’re not learning anything................

  5. #15

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    Quote Originally Posted by Aknib View Post
    I've visited this before and almost pulled the trigger before backing off but it's not going away.

    Does anyone have one of these and in particular one of the Avons?

    I'm hanging my nose over the 1lb t/c Avon but know that the others will surely follow if I get one and like it, I've been looking to simplfy (even further!) my fishing and it will mean selling some if not all of the Hardys (and a bit more) to finance the change which will be an irreversible move.

    But, even so...

    I'm still interested.

    I have heard that the t/c's tend to fish around 1/4lb stronger than their round walled equivalents and I am aware that they're carbon, despite their lustful cane appearance.

    I've also heard it said that the Hardy Avons are about as true an action to cane as you can get and I have to admit I love 'em but I've never heard from anyone with a Hexagraph.

    Anyone have any information please?

    I may well still not do it although I'm fast running out of reasons (other than the price tag) not to.
    I have a feeling it will be an itch you have to scratch, or you will regret it. However from what I know, (but Sam may correct me) They are heavy and sloppy, compared to modern rods, wonderful to look at, but? I had that itch with cane rods, scratched it and came out the other side, with a lot less money in my pocket.
    Some guys on this site like the Hardy range of course rods, and buy them up when they see them. I tried them and found them thick and heavy, again compared to the modern rods, but again it was just my own view. Many will not agree, but it's why we are talking about a Hexagraph??

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    North Yorkshire.
    Posts
    10,973

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    Quote Originally Posted by dicky123 View Post
    However from what I know, (but Sam may correct me) They are heavy and sloppy, compared to modern rods, wonderful to look at, but?
    Not me, I've barely laid eyes on them. I've never even heard of a Haxagraph float rod, so I'm not overly interested anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by dicky123 View Post
    Some guys on this site like the Hardy range of course rods, and buy them up when they see them. I tried them and found them thick and heavy, again compared to the modern rods, but again it was just my own view.
    On that I can agree. They look nice, the action may well be delightful and they have a little castle tower on them, but they never called to me. I actually had the chance to buy some at prices that made them look expensive when they were cleared by Pure Fishing (through a few outlets (Bobco, Climax and NWA etc)). From a purely financial aspect, I regret not buying a load of them. From a purely angling view point, I have no regrets in passing on them.

  7. #17

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    Quote Originally Posted by dicky123 View Post
    I have a feeling it will be an itch you have to scratch, or you will regret it. However from what I know, (but Sam may correct me) They are heavy and sloppy, compared to modern rods, wonderful to look at, but? I had that itch with cane rods, scratched it and came out the other side, with a lot less money in my pocket.
    Some guys on this site like the Hardy range of course rods, and buy them up when they see them. I tried them and found them thick and heavy, again compared to the modern rods, but again it was just my own view. Many will not agree, but it's why we are talking about a Hexagraph??
    Dicky, the hexograph rods are carbon but are made with the look of a cane rod, I think they do look very nice.
    They may be fantastic, no doubt Ste will inform us of their qualities in the not too distant future .

    Regarding the hardy rods, the ones i've seen and have are far from being thick or heavy. I'm one of their admirers as you can probably guess .

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    leafy cheshire
    Posts
    12,631

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    Ive never been a tackle tart so never wanted one.

    Emperors new clothes maybe. A few years ago I bought a Ticast John Allerton from a guy in Bolton at a good price. The guy was selling other bits and I bought a Stradic as well. He asked me if I fancied a hexagon shaped cane rod which he described to me as a rod and that he had nver used it.I didn’t even look at it as wasn’t interested and i recalled my bamboo rod aged 9 or 10. I wonder if it was a Hexagraph ; I’ll never know.
    Last edited by mikench; 01-03-2020 at 10:37.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Stuck on the chuffin M25 somewhere between Heathrow and the A3
    Posts
    11,491

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    I had a fairly good go of a hexagraph soon after they first appeared. Met a guy using one and he very generously let me try it. I loved the look and was much smitten though I thought the action a bit soft...on reflection much like a cane avon which ( I guess) the lighter Hexagraphs were intended to mirror. Awful lot of money though.

    I didnt see another for years until I met a guy using one on one of my club waters. I admired the rod and he said he'd always wanted one so he treated himself when he retired. He told me how much it had cost him and I nearly fell over. I had a waggle and I confess I was rather disappointed. It was a heavier tc than the one I'd had a go of years ago and my immediate reaction was " ordinary". I think that cured me of the long held desire to own one....that and the cost. Lovely looking rod though but I didnt get the feeling that it could do anything that several of my current squad couldnt do equally well.

    Looked really odd with a very ordinary reel on it too. A rod like that deserved a better reel imo but like I said....I do have TT tendencies.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Stoke-on-Trent
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Bruce & Walker Hexagraph

    i have a hexagraph avon which i acquired cheaply because i liked the look of it. Being a cane user the style appealed to me but the action is sloppy and honestly can see no advantage in the hexagon shape its just an esthetics thing really and if id paid top whack for one id be gutted

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