Waders - Help!!

Jim Crosskey 2

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Hi there

First off, i'm not a fly angler... but i'm posting in here as i figure this is where the knowledge will be...

So i do a bit of course fishing, and i particularly like fishing on rivers like the wye. On my most recent trip there, the river wasn't so great for static feeder fishing, but did respond very well to trotting tactics with a float. It struck me as i was fishing that if i could get in the river (which was at the time very low indeed) i could have accessed all sorts of interesting runs - which were just inaccessible from the bank.

So i'm thinking about buying some waders. However, whilst i can get my head round the different types of material, i keep coming back to one question which i'm hoping someone here can answer... are you constantly getting in and out of your waders according to whether you're fishing in the river or not? Or do you rather put them on when you start fishing and then just leave them on all day, regardless of whether your in the river or not?

Also, same question of wading boots? Do you take these with you and only put them on when you get in the water, or get dressed in them at the start and keep them on all day?

Hope these aren't silly questions! Any guidance much appreciated....

cheers
Jim
 

barbelboi

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Jim, I'm not a fluff chucker either but tend to keep my (neoprene) waders on for the session - I only use then during the autumn and winter months as they can be a tad warm in the summer. I also use them when the bank side is soaking wet and I have no intention of going in for a paddle.
 

theartist

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Its all a trade off Jim regarding how much you want to carry to the bank, how far it is and how hot it is.

The only time I don't wear waders is if I know there's going to be no wading at all as I feel naked without them, they keep my trousers clean, are ideal for going through undergrowth, got good grip as well as the obvious standing in the water benefits.

There are times when I've had a trek and thought I'm too old for this and worse still is when you find yourself in a great looking swim but there's nowhere to get in the water and the sun is cooking you. Most days the bottom of my trousers and socks will be wet with sweat at the end of the day as any walking will heat them up. All this is worse with chest waders.

To compensate I make sure I got plenty of water but I almost take as much weight in drink than if I carried said boots to the river but the pros outweigh the cons for me - just.

Rob
 

geoffmaynard

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If you buy a pair of breathable chest waders they'll be wearable in all seasons. Neoprene ones will get too hot in summer as you do tend to put them on and keep them on all day.
I bought a pair of Bison ones for about £100 a few years ago and I wear them a lot. They started to leak a bit last summer so I sent them off to Diver Dave who is a bit of a legend in wader circles (google him) and he re-waterproofed them for about £50.
You need to decide if you want boot-foot or stocking foot ones. Boot foot are easier to get on and off but stocking foot ones with the overboots are going to be tougher I would say. If you are wealthy, buy Simms. Everyone raves about them.
 

sam vimes

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The advice I got was to avoid neoprene unless you fish exclusively in the depths of winter. If you intend to (or have to) walk any distance in them, buy breathable.

I bought breathables without any regrets, though I am tempted by some neoprenes purely for winter use. I was wary of using the felt soled wading boots that came as part of the deal. However, I'm glad they were forced on me. I trust them far more than any other kind of sole I've been in a river wearing. Not quite so good on dry land, especially on wet vegetation. However, bthe addition of a few strategically placed studs sorts that.
 

tigger

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Unless i'm gonn'a be wading in deeper runs I wear some old Hunter streamfisher thigh waders, I just fold them over when walking between swims. I used to use neoprene chest waders but bought some Greys breathable waders to see if they where any better and they're far more comfortable plus i've found them to be warmer than the neoprenes. In winter I wear a pair of long woolen socks, thermal long johns and a pair of fleecy jogging bottoms and i've been warm enough.
I think your sweat is trapped in the neoprenes and this makes you cold in freezing conditions.
I got a pair of felt soled wader boots with the breathable waders and they really are great. I thought they might be slippy on grass bankings etc and that I might need a few studs screwing in but the felt soles have been fine as they are. The worst substrate for felt soles is thick hard mud, then they might be slippy.
 

Jim Crosskey 2

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Thanks very much for all the input!! Looks like breathable and separate boots is the way forward then
 

athomas

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You'll sweat like hell in neoprenes if you're in them all day in this weather.
The stockingfoot breathables can be worn with old trainers which are much more comfortable than the boits, or you could fet the boot fit.

Diver Dave in Aberdeen refurbishes waders and sells bearly new which have had all their seams sealed,might be cheaper.
 

Peter Jacobs

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I use mine a lot for fly fishing but rarely bother when Coarse fishing, although sometimes, as you say, you can reach much better looking glides to trot a float down.

After a few disasters with cheapie waders I opted for a pair of Scierra chest waders, not neopprene and with separate wading boots.

These have seen active service for 4 seasons now and never a hint of a leak. They are not cheap, but then quality rarely is . . . . . .
 
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Pete Shears

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Try Snowbee, I have had a few from them over the years, all good, look at the clearance section first on their website, if stuck give them a ring, they have been very helpful in the past.
 
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