Jig heads bit of mine feild.

Tree123

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What to try and get some confidence back in lure fishing.

But I'm really confused by all the jig heads

Cheb head. Squirm head. Ned heads .

It's a bit of mind field. I want to have a go using creature baits and the ned rig as I've done a bit a of shad work and dropshoting with mixed results.

I already have some "normal" ball jig heads do you have to have a a specific head a specific method. I m trying to keep things simple of possible and prefer not to have buy 100 different heads
 

Ray Roberts

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I’m no expert but I have recently had a fair bit of success with small curly tailed jelly worms on a small ball head and also Z Man crays on the same ball heads but in a slightly larger size. The crays are buoyant and stand up as you bounce them along the bottom. As do the neds. The Korum versions come already rigged if you prefer.


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Tree123

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Yeah I'd seen those and I'm big fan of anything korum. The kits do look a bit pricey compared to buying jig heads and the lures.

My local the range should does the ball jighead really cheap. Like 1.50 for 4 or 5.

The cheb hooks to look different but personally cant see much difference between the "ned' jig heads ans the standard ball jig heads
 
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The cheb hooks to look different but personally cant see much difference between the "ned' jig heads ans the standard ball jig heads

I think this is a fair assessment. Given that the 'Ned Rig' uses a buoyant soft plastic and as light a jig head as you can get away with, the lure should sit up off the bottom when the retrieve is paused - regardless of whether you're using a jig head marketed especially for this style of fishing, or just a plain ball-head jig.

One thing I've found is that buying lots of jig heads of different shapes, with different amounts of weight and different sizes of hook can quickly become expensive. I really do like the Cheb Rig for this reason. A few different sizes of Cheb weight and different sizes and patterns of hook make for a versatile and simple approach.

Recently I bought some tungsten Cheb weights but I've found that, in the smaller sizes (1-2 grams) they are very fiddly to set up, especially with cold fingers simply because they are so tiny. I'll be sticking to the cheaper lead Cheb weights when I just need a small amount of weight.
 

Tree123

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In terms simplify I'm just going to stick with
Ned rig set up on the ball jigs as everyone says it should work the same

Spinner blades

Dropshots

As these should cover all my bases for chasing/finding fish the to going down the finesse route to catch the shoal.
 

Keep

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Cheb heads work alongside weedless hooks. I strongly recommend getting tungsten ones which are much smaller in size compared to lead ones of the same weight

Jig heads give a better hookup rate compared to Cheb heads, but the weight and hook are fixed together so you miss out on the articulation of chebs and you get more weed snags

ned heads just seem to be a variation of jig heads made just for floating worm lures that you'd bounce along the bottom, I wouldn't worry much about these

that's about it
 
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This is going to sound like I'm a bit short of things to do, but I've been experimenting with a jug of water and various different hooks, jig heads cheb weights etc. along with different soft plastic lures. This has actually caused me to rethink my earlier comments about mushroom headed jigs not being particularly important when using ned rig type tactics.

What I've found is that, unless you have a super buoyant lure (the Z-man lures tend to be more buoyant than some of the cheaper alternatives), as soon as you add a hook (or standard ball headed jig) to the lure it will keel over at 45 degrees with the hook point on the bottom. I think this helps to explain why these rigs are prone to snagging unless a weedless hook is used. Even then, a weedless hook has more mass than a straight J-hook, and the lure will still keel over as described above.

If you want to be absolutely sure that your ned rig is presenting your lure standing up straight off the bottom, then the mushroom headed jigs are the way to go. I've recently sourced a couple of different suppliers on Ebay. Rob Russell (Russell Lures), in particular, does some quite inexpensive jigs - including some with smaller hooks than seems to be 'standard' for this method. You can find Russell Lures on Facebook. He doesn't sell through Ebay currently. Rob's soft lures are well worth a look too.
 

spoonminnow

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" What I've found is that, unless you have a super buoyant lure (the Z-man lures tend to be more buoyant than some of the cheaper alternatives), as soon as you add a hook (or standard ball headed jig) to the lure it will keel over at 45 degrees with the hook point on the bottom. "

So true.
The plastic (plastisol) used to make soft plastic lures comes in different grades: sinking, floating and medium as well as softness grades. I've been pouring plastic lures for over 15 years and use only a few grades of buoyancy and softness.
Stand-up and mushroom heads do have the advantage over ball head jigs for strictly bottom presentations, but as Mark said, most keel over within seconds depending how long the bait is (i.e. over 10cm) regardless jig head design. Hopping the lure on bottom keeps it near vertical vs dragging the bait making jig weight a consideration.

For horizontal swims, the ball head IMO does fine. The ball head / Mr Twister curl-tail grub combo caught my first river bass many decades ago and thousands of fish since in a variety of waters. Jig head size (wt.) and hook size are at times more important than head style alone. 1/32 oz. vs 1/8 oz can make all the difference in the world as it relates to a horizontal presentation speed or rate of drop. Hooks that are too small lose fish especially large fish. My rule-of-thumb is that the hook exit 1/3 of the body; too long a hook kills lure action.
 
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